• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2017, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Mickey Gilley, which he submitted to this site on Saturday 22 April 2017.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Mickey Gilley who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Gary Cornelius

Sean Brady would also like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Gary Cornelius, who plays drums in The Urban Cowboy Band, and has been with Mickey Gilley for over twenty years, without whom this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote' would not have been possible.
Gene Watson & Mickey Gilley at American Music Theatre in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on Sunday 13 July 2014

Mickey Gilley
This quote was submitted on Saturday 22 April 2017.

'
I have seen Gene Watson many times and loved every minute of his performance.


He is truly one of the finest entertainers and greatest singers to ever grace the stage'.

Thank you, Mickey Gilley, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Mickey Gilley...

Mickey Gilley

Mickey Gilley was born Mickey Leroy Gilley on Monday 9 March 1936 in Natchez, Mississippi.  Although he started out singing straight-up country music material in the 1970s, Mickey Gilley moved towards a more pop-friendly sound in the 1980s, bringing him further success on not just the Billboard country music singles chart, but the Billboard pop music singles chart as well.

Mickey Gilley is a cousin of Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl McVoy, Jim Gilley and Jimmy Swaggart.  According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Mickey Gilley is a licensed pilot, holding an instrument rating with commercial pilot privileges for multi-engine airplanes, as well as private pilot privileges for single engine aircraft.

Mickey Gilley

Raised in Ferriday, Louisiana along with his two famous cousins, Jerry Lee Lewis and Jimmy Swaggart, it was there where Mickey Gilley's love and appreciation of music grew.  He absorbed the haunting sounds of Louisiana rhythm and blues by sneaking up to the windows of the clubs at night.

Mickey Gilley learned to play piano at an early age, but did not achieve the success of his cousin Jerry Lee Lewis until later.

Moving to Houston, Texas in the early 1950s to work construction, Mickey Gilley did not start playing until 1957, when he recorded his first record, 'Ooh We Baby', a song which was later used in a commercial for Yoplait yogurt.

In 1959, Mickey Gilley had his first charted record, 'Is It Wrong For Loving You?', on which Kenny Rogers played the bass.  Mickey Gilley continued playing in cities throughout the south, but eventually settled into Pasadena, Texas where he began performing at The Nesadel Club.

There he developed into one of the city’s most popular acts, while playing there for more than ten years.  While at The Nesadel Club, Mickey Gilley had his second charted record, 'Lonely Wine' (written by Ray Wells).

Mickey Gilley: 'Lonely Wine' (Astro Records, 1964)

In 1964, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Lonely Wine' (Astro Records, 1964), on his own record label (Astro Records), which was produced by Doyle Jones, and included the following tracks:

'Now That I Have You' (written by Mickey Gilley)
'Lonely Wine' (written by Ray Wells)
'I'm to Blame' (written by Joe Davis)
'Valley of Tears' (written by Antonio Domino and Dave Bartholomew)
'I Ain't Goin' Home' (written by Mickey Gilley and George Khoury)
'That's How It's Got to Be', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Mort Dixon
'Grapevine' (written by Jimmy Dale)
'Lonely, Lonely Nights' (written by Cam King and Rick Vincent)

'Your First Time', which was written by Huey Purvis Meaux (Sunday 10 March 1929 - Saturday 23 April 2011)
'Drinkin' Wine Spo Dee O'Dee Drinkin' Wine' (written by Granville McGhee and Mayo Williams)
'It All Depends' (written by Billy Mize)
''End of The Line' (written by Al Downing and Vernon Sandusky)
'Is It Wrong (For Loving You)' (written by Warner McPherson)
'C.C. Rider' (written by Chuck Willis and Ma Rainey)
'Everything Turned to Love' (written by Mickey Gilley and William Allen)
'Breeze' (written by Sal Garcia)
'Caught in The Middle', which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995)
'Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie Carter)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Lonely Wine' (Astro Records, 1964) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Carl Wheeler (guitar)
Marshall Harrod (bass)
Gerald Highburger (drums)
Doyle Jones and Jay Boyett (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'Lonely Wine' (Astro Records, 1964) was recorded, between 1958 and 1964, in Houston, Texas.

Mickey Gilley: 'Down The Line' (Paula Records, 1967)

In 1967, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Down The Line' (Paula Records, 1967), which was produced by Doyle Jones, and included the following tracks:

'Lonely Wine' (written by Roy Wells)
'Down The Line', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988)
'Forgive' (written by 
R.S. Hebert)
'My Babe' (written by 
Willie Dixon)
'I'm to Blame', which was written by Huey Purvis Meaux (Sunday 10 March 1929 - Saturday 23 April 2011)
'Turn Around', which was written by 
Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998)
'Night After Night (Love After Love)' (written by 
Doyle Jones and Mickey Gilley)
'Susie Q' (written by 
Dale Hawkins and Stanley Lewis)
'I'll Make It All Up to You', which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995)
'Is It Wrong (For Loving You)' (written by 
Warner McPherson)
'Breathless' , which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002)
'Lotta Lovin' (written by Bernice Bedwell)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Down The Line' (Paula Records, 1967) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Carl Wheeler (guitar)
Marshall Harrod (bass)
Gerald Highburger (drums)
Doyle Jones and Jay Boyett (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'Down The Line' (Paula Records, 1967) was recorded in 1960 at Jones Studio in Houston, Texas.

In 1968, Mickey Giley saw the release of 'Now I Can Live Again', a non-album single, which reached No.68 on the Billboard country music singles chart.
Gilley's
In 1971, along with business partner, Sherwood Cryer, Mickey Gilley opened the world famous Gilley’s, a night club in Pasadena, Texas.  The club grew and was entered into the Guinness Record Book as the 'World’s Largest Honky-Tonk'.

Mickey Gilley

By the mid-1970s, Mickey Gilley's songs were hitting the Billboard country music singles chart with regularity.

In 1973, in order to promote his musical endeavours in the Houston, Texas area Mickey Gilley recorded 'She Called Me Baby', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002), specifically for a local jukebox operator who wanted a copy of the song.

It was also at this time that Mickey Gilley recorded 'Abilene', which was written by John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 - Wednesday 21 September 2016) and Bob Gibson (Monday 16 November 1931 - Saturday 28 September 1996), and was a Billboard No.1 hit single for George Hamilton IV (Monday 19 July 1937 - Wednesday 17 September 2014) in 1963, along with 'When Two Worlds Collide', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992) and Bill Anderson, and was first recorded by Jim Reeves (Monday 20 August 1923 - Friday 31 July 1964) in 1962.

Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley: At His Best' (Paula Records, 1974)

In 1974, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Mickey Gilley: At His Best' (Paula Records, 1974), which included the following tracks:

'I'm to Blame', which was written by Huey Purvis Meaux (Sunday 10 March 1929 - Saturday 23 April 2011)
'Night After Night (Love After Love)' (written by Doyle Jones and Mickey Gilley)
'Susie Q' (written by Dale Hawkins and Stanley Lewis)
'I'll Make It All Up to You', which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995)
'Breathless' , which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002)
'Is It Wrong (For Loving You)' (written by Warner McPherson)
'Lonely Wine' (written by Roy Wells)
'Down The Line', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988)
'Forgive' (written by R.S. Hebert)
'My Babe' (written by Willie Dixon)
'Turn Around (I'll Be Following You)', which was written by Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998)
'Lotta Lovin' (written by Bernice Bedwell)

Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey Gilley: At His Best' (Paula Records, 1974) reached No.49 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

It was while Mickey Gilley was at Gilley’s that he started experiencing his first success when he saw the release of 'Room Full of Roses' (written by Tim Spencer).

Mickey Gilley: 'Room Full of Roses' (Playboy Records, 1974)

In April 1974, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Room Full of Roses' (Playboy Records, 1974), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles, on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Room Full of Roses' (written by Tim Spencer) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1974) / this track also reached No.50 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1974)
'I Overlooked An Orchid', which was written by Carl Story (Monday 29 May 1916 - Friday 31 March 1995), Shirl Lyn and Carl Smith (Tuesday 15 March 1927 - Saturday 16 January 2010) (No.1 for one week in November 1974)

Mickey Gilley's 'Room Full of Roses' (Playboy Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Faded Love', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and John Wills
'Plastic Saddle' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'Someday (You'll Want Me to Want You)' (written by Jimmy Hodges)
'Don't Be Angry' (written by Wade Jackson)
'San Antonio Rose', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975)
'Please Love Me Forever' (written by Ollie Blanchard and Johnny Malone)
'Swinging Doors', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'She Called Me Baby', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Room Full of Roses' (Playboy Records, 1974) included the following tracks:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Bobby Dyson (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)

Mickey Gilley's 'Room Full of Roses' (Playboy Records, 1974), which was recorded, in January 1974, at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville, reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1974.

Mickey Gilley: 'City Lights' (Playboy Records, 1975)

In January 1975, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'City Lights' (Playboy Records, 1975), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.1 for one week in February 1975)

Mickey Gilley's 'City Lights' (Playboy Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Big Ole Texas Tears' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'I Love You So Much (It Hurts)', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'Backslide' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'Fraulein', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)
'More & More', which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991)
'Even The Bad Times Are Good', which was written by Carl Belew (Tuesday 21 April 1931 - Wednesday 31 October 1990) and Clyde Pitts (1939 - Saturday 26 March 2011)
'You Are My Sunshine', which was written by Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000) and Charles Mitchell
'Who'll Turn Out The Lights (In Your World Tonight)', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015) and Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004)
'Goodnight Irene', which was written by Huddie William Ledbetter (Lead Belly) (20 January 1889 - Tuesday 6 December 1949) and John Avery Lomax (23 September 1867 - Monday 26 January 1948)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'City Lights' (Playboy Records, 1975) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Bobby Dyson (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
The Lea Jane Singers (vocals)

Mickey Gilley's 'City Lights' (Playboy Records, 1975), which was recorded, in September 1974, at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville, reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey's Movin' On' (Playboy Records, 1975)

In May 1975, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Mickey's Movin' On' (Playboy Records, 1975), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (No.1 for one week in June 1975)

Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey's Movin' On' (Playboy Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Movin' On', which was written by Hank Snow (Saturday 9 May 1914 - Monday 20 December 1999)
'You'll Never Know', which was written by Mack Gordon (Tuesday 21 June 1904 - Sunday 1 March 1959) and Harry Warren (24 December 1893 - Tuesday 22 September 1981)
'How I Love Then Old Songs', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002)
'I Love You Because', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969)
'Pen & Paper', which was written by Eddie Kilroy Dianne Kilroy
'Honky Tonk Wine', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004)
'Betty & Dupree' (written by Chuck Willis)
'In a Shanty in Old Shanty Town' (written by Joe Young, Ira Schuster and Jack Little)
'Hole He Said He'd Dig For Me' (written by Marion Turner and Z.Z. Zillion)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey's Movin' On' (Playboy Records, 1975) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977) and Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar, banjo)
Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Bobby Dyson (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
The Lea Jane Singers (vocals)

Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey's Movin' On' (Playboy Records, 1975), which was recorded in January 1975, at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville, reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Mickey Gilley: 'Overnight Sensation' (Playboy Records, 1975)

In November 1975, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Overnight Sensation' (Playboy Records, 1975), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Bouquet of Roses', which was written by Bob Hilliard (Monday 28 January 1918 - Monday 1 February 1971) and Steve Nelson (No.11, 1975)
'Overnight Sensation' (written by Bob McDill) (No.7, 1975) / this track was a duet with Barbi Benton

Mickey Gilley's 'Overnight Sensation' (Playboy Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'I'll Sail My Ship Alone' (written by Lois Mann, Henry Bernard and Murray Burns)
'Where Do You Go to Lose a Heartache' (written by Eddie Kilroy)
'Tender Years' (written by Darrell Edwards)
'There Ain't No Queen (in My King Size Bed)' (written by Bobby Borchers)
'Sweet Mama Goodtimes', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004)
'Hungry For The Sunshine' (written by Linne Black)

'If You Were Mine to Lose' (written by Mickey Jaco)
'Drinking Champagne' (written by Bill Mack)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Overnight Sensation' (Playboy Records, 1975) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Bobby Dyson (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
The Lea Jane Singers (vocals)

Mickey Gilley's 'Overnight Sensation' (Playboy Records, 1975), which was recorded, in September 1975, at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville, reached No.4 on the Buillboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975.

Mickey Gilley: 'Wild Side of Life' (Hilltop Records, 1976)

In 1976, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Wild Side of Life' (Hilltop Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

'Wild Side of Life' (written by William Warren and Arlie Carter)
'Caught in The Middle', which was written by Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995)
'Shake It For Mickey Gilley' (written by 
Mickey Gilley)
'Moments to Remember' (written by 
Robert Allen and Al Stillman)
'Now That I Have You' (written by 
Mickey Gilley)
'Breeze (Blow My Baby Back to Me)', which was written by 
Ted Daffan (Saturday 21 September 1912 - Sunday 6 October 1996) and Bernard Landes
'Sad Faced Little Fellow' (written by 
Mickey Gilley)
'I Still Care' (written by Mickey Gilley)
'Fraulein', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)

Mickey Gilley: 'Gilley's Greatest Hits 1' (Playboy Records, 1976)

In March 1976, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Gilley's Greatest Hits 1' (Playboy Records, 1976), which included the following tracks:

'Room Full of Roses' (written by Tim Spencer) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1974) / this track also reached No.50 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1974
'More & More', which was written by Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005) and Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991) / this track was an album track from 1975
'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson(No.1 for one week in February 1975)
'I'll Sail My Ship Alone' (written by Lois Mann, Henry Bernard and Murray Burns) / this track was an album track from 1975
'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (No.1 for one week in June 1975)
'I Overlooked An Orchid', which was written by Carl Story (Monday 29 May 1916 - Friday 31 March 1995), Shirl Lyn and Carl Smith (Tuesday 15 March 1927 - Saturday 16 January 2010) (No.1 for one week in November 1974)
'Fraulein', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007) / this track was an album track from 1975
'Faded Love', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and John Wills / this track was an album track from 1974
'How I Love Then Old Songs', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002) / this track was an album track from 1975
'Bouquet of Roses', which was written by Bob Hilliard (Monday 28 January 1918 - Monday 1 February 1971) and Steve Nelson (No.11, 1975)

Mickey Gilley's 'Gilley's Greatest Hits 1' (Playboy Records, 1976) reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976.

Mickey Gilley: 'Gilley's Smokin' (Playboy Records, 1976)

In November 1976, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Gilley's Smokin' (Playboy Records, 1976), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Don't The Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time' (written by Baker Knight) (No.1 for one week in May 1976) / this track, which was named 'Song of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards in May 1977, was originally offered to Gene Watson, but he decided not to record it
'Bring It On Home to Me', which was written by Sam Cooke (Sam Cook (Thursday 22 January 1931 - Friday 11 December 1964) (No.1 for one week in August 1976) / this track was named 'Single Record of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards in May 1977
'Lawdy Miss Clawdy' (written by Lloyd Price) (No.3, 1976)

Mickey Gilley's 'Gilley's Smokin' (Playboy Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'There's a Song on The Jukebox', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986)
'L-O-V-E' (written by Milt Gabler and Bert Kaempfert)
'What Is It', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015), Billy Arr and James Marshall
'My Babe' (written by Ron Holden)
'How's My Ex Treating You' (written by Vic McAlpin)
'I Just Can't Get Her Out of My Mind' (written by Larry Gatlin)
'I'll Fly Away', which was written by Albert Edward Brumley (Sunday 29 October 1905 - Tuesday 15 November 1977)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Gilley's Smokin' (Playboy Records, 1976) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano, harmonica)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977), Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Russ Hicks and Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Bobby Dyson (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
The Lea Jane Singers (vocals)

Mickey Gilley's 'Gilley's Smokin' (Playboy Records, 1976), which was recorded, at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville (September 1975), and at Woodland Sound Studio in Nashville (May 1976 and August 1976).

Mickey Gilley's 'Gilley's Smokin' (Playboy Records, 1976), which reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976, was awarded 'Album of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards in May 1977.

Mickey Gilley: 'First Class' (Playboy Records, 1977)

In May 1977, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'First Class' (Playboy Records, 1977), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She's Pulling Me Back Again' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1977)
'Honky Tonk Memories' (written by Rory Bourke, Gene Dobbins and Johnny Wilson) (No.4, 1977)
'Chains of Love' (written by A. Nugetre and Harry VanWalls) (No.9, 1977)

Mickey Gilley's 'First Class' (Playboy Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Five Foot Two Eyes of Blue' (written by Joe Young, Sam Lewis and Ray Henderson)
'Wednesday Night Poker' (written by Wayne C. Thompson and Donald Miller)
'Hang Together' (written by Jerry Chesnut, David Wilkins and Tommy Myracle)
'My Old Flame is Burnin' Another Honky Tonk Down', which was written by Wayne Kemp (Sunday 1 June 1941 - Monday 9 March 2015), Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004) and Bobby Borchers
'No.1 Rock 'n' Roll Country & Western Boogie Blues Man' (written by Tom Maberry)
'It's Just a Matter of Making Up My Mind' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Fannie Mae' (written by Waymon Glasco)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'First Class' (Playboy Records, 1977) included the following:

The Lea Jane Singers (vocals)
Bobby Dyson and Bergen White (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'First Class' (Playboy Records, 1977), which was recorded, in December 1976, at Fireside Recording Studio in Nashville, reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977.

It was also in May 1977 when Mickey Gilley was awarded 'Top Male Vocalist' and 'Entertainer of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards.

Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley: At His Best, Volume 2' (Paula Records, 1978)

In 1978, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Mickey Gilley: At His Best, Volume 2' (Paula Records, 1978), which included the following tracks:

'She's Still Got a Hold on You', which was written by Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
'Running Out of Reasons' (written by John Gostick and Richard Westmoreland)
'World of Our Own' (written by David O'Brien)
'(Don't Do It Darlin') That Heart Belongs to Me', which was written by Webb Pierce (Monday 8 August 1921 - Sunday 24 February 1991)
'I'm Gonna Put My Love in The Want Ads' (written by Mickey Gilley and Jay Boyett)
'(It's Just a Matter of) Making Up My Mind' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Now I Can Live Again' (written by Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
'There's No One Like You' (written by 
Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'You Can Count Me Missing' (written by 
John Gostick and Richard Westmoreland)
'New Way to Live' (written by 
Gene Davis)
'Watching The Way' (written by 
John Gostick and Richard Westmoreland)

Mickey Gilley: 'Flyin' High' (Playboy Records, 1978)

In February 1978, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Flyin' High' (Playboy Records, 1978), which was produced by Eddie Kilroy, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Power of Positive Drinking', which was written by Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Rick Klang (No.8, 1978)
'Here Comes The Hurt Again' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.9, 1978)

Mickey Gilley's 'Flyin' High' (Playboy Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Heaven Ain't a Honky Tonk', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004)
'Pretend' (written by 
Lew Douglas, Cliff Parman and Frank LaVere)
'It Makes No Difference Now', which was written by 
Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003) and Jimmie Davis (11 September 1899 - Sunday 5 November 2000)
'Before It Begins' (written by 
Jerry Chesnut, David Wilkins and Tommy Myracle)
'One Has My Name (The Other Has My Heart)' (written by 
Eddie Dean, Dixie Dean and Hal Blair)
'I Hate It, But I Drink It Away' (written by 
Dennis Coats and Bruce Innes)
'Playing My Old Piano' (written by 
Tom Maberry)
'Once Before I Die, I Wanna See a Honky Tonk Angel Fly', which was written by 
Bobby Borchers and Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Flyin' High' (Playboy Records, 1978) included the following:

The Lea Jane Singers (vocals)
Bobby Dyson and Bergen White (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'Flyin' High' (Playboy Records, 1978), which was recorded, in 1977, at Fireside Recording Studio in Nashville, reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Mickey Gilley: 'Gilley's Greatest Hits, Volume 2' (Playboy Records, 1978)

In October 1978, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Gilley's Greatest Hits, Volume 2' (Playboy Records, 1978), which included the following tracks:

'Bring It On Home to Me', which was written by Sam Cooke (Sam Cook (Thursday 22 January 1931 - Friday 11 December 1964) (No.1 for one week in August 1976) / this track was named 'Single Record of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards in May 1977
'Honky Tonk Wine', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004) / this track was an album track from 1975
'Overnight Sensation' (written by Bob McDill) (No.7, 1975) / this track was a duet with Barbi Benton
'Sweet Mama Goodtimes', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004) / this track was an album track from 1975
'I Love You So Much (It Hurts)', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003) / this track was an album track from 1975
'No.1 Rock 'n' Roll Country & Western Boogie Blues Man' (written by Tom Maberry) / this track was an album track from 1977
'You'll Never Know', which was written by Mack Gordon (Tuesday 21 June 1904 - Sunday 1 March 1959) and Harry Warren (24 December 1893 - Tuesday 22 September 1981)  / this track was an album track from 1975
'Don't The Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time' (written by Baker Knight) (No.1 for one week in May 1976) / this track, which was named 'Song of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards in May 1977, was originally offered to Gene Watson, but he decided not to record it
'Backslide' (written by Vic McAlpin) / this track was an album track from 1975
'Lawdy Miss Clawdy' (written by Lloyd Price) (No.3, 1976)

Mickey Gilley's 'Gilley's Greatest Hits, Volume 2' (Playboy Records, 1978) reached No.30 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

Mickey Gilley: 'The Songs We Made Love To' (Epic Records, 1979)

In March 1979, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'The Songs We Made Love To' (Epic Records, 1979), which was produced by Bill Rice, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Song We Made Love To' (written by Kenneth Wahle) (No.13, 1978)
'Just Long Enough to Say Goodbye' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.10, 1979)

Mickey Gilley's 'The Songs We Made Love To' (Epic Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Bye Bye Baby' (written by Mort Dixon and Ray Henderson)
'Junior P. Jones' (written by 
Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Lonely Wine' (written by 
Ray Wells)
'I Don't Think Like No Hero Tonight' (written by Jim McBride)
'Tonight I'll Help You Say Goodbye Again' (written by 
Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Tyin' One On (To Make One Off My Mind)' (written by 
Danny Jackson)
'Even The Good Can Go Bad' (written by 
Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
''when I Lose You Anna' 
(written by Roger Murrah)

Mickey Gilley's 'The Songs We Made Love To' (Epic Records, 1979), which was recorded, in October 1978, at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville, reached No.49 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979.

Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979) Mickey Gilley: 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979)

In October 1979, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979), which was produced by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'My Silver Lining' (written by Roger Murrah) (No.8, 1979)
'A Little Gettin' Used To' (written by Jerry Taylor) (No.17, 1979)

Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'I'd Be Over You' (written by Scotty Emerick and John S. Sherrill)
'Can't Nobody Love You' (written by James Mitchell)
'I'm Gettin' Holes in My Boots' (written by Roger Murrah and Scott Anders)
'Thousand Times' (written by Wayne C. Thompson and Ronnie Reno)
'If You Love Me' (written by Curtis Young)
'Keep on Telling Me Lies' (written by Roger Murrah and Tim Lewis)
'Picture of Your Love' (written by Ronnie Robinson)
'Mothers & Daddys' (written by Roger Murrah and Jim McBride)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979) included the following:

Sheldon Kurland Strings (strings)
The Lea Jane Singers and Tina Murrah (vocals)
Bill Justis (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'Mickey Gilley' (Epic Records, 1979) was recorded, in 1979, at LSI Sound Studio in Nashville, and Gilley's Recording Studio in Pasadena, Texas.
Gilley's
As the 1980s neared, Mickey Gilley was growing bigger with every day.  Country music’s biggest stars used Gilley’s as a launching pad.  A television show was developed which only added to the phenomenon.  But it was when Esquire Magazine caught wind of the excitement and featured an article called 'The Ballad of The Urban Cowboy', which caused Gilley’s to develop into an Urban Cowboy craze.

With Gilley’s rising in popularity, so too did Mickey Gilley’s.

'Urban Cowboy' is an American romantic drama film (released by Paramount Pictures in 1980) about the love-hate relationship between Buford Uan 'Bud' Davis (John Travolta) and Sissy (Debra Winger), which captured the late 1970s / early 1980s popularity of country music / The film was John Travolta's third major acting role after 'Saturday Night Fever' and 'Grease' / Much of the action centred around activities at Gilley's Club, a honky tonk in Pasadena, Texas

Mickey Gilley’s success, along with the attention of the Esquire Magazine article led Paramount Pictures to film a movie in 1979; 'Urban Cowboy' ((Paramount Pictures, 1980), starred John Travolta and Debra Winger and predominately featured Gilley’s.  Upon the movie’s release, 'Urban Cowboy' became a phenomenon.  The soundtrack featured many popular artists, including a huge hit by Mickey Gilley, 'Stand By Me', which went Platinum and it made Mickey Gilley a household name.

Also on the album was 'Orange Blossom Special', which was performed by Mickey Gilley’s Urban Cowboy Band, and earned a Grammy Award.

Mickey Gilley was also awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and played for two presidents during his career.

Mickey Gilley: 'That's All That Matters to Me' (Epic Records, 1980)

In May 1980, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'That's All That Matters to Me' (Epic Records, 1980), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'True Love Ways', which was written by Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Norman Petty (Wednesday 25 May 1927 - Wednesday 15 August 1984) (No.1 for one week in July 1980) / this track also reached No.66 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'That's All That Matters to Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in December 1980)
'A Headache Tomorrow (or a Heartache Tonight)' (written by Chick Rains) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1981)

Mickey Gilley's 'That's All That Matters to Me' (Epic Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Blues Don't Care Who's Got 'Em' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Dickey Lee)
'More I Turn The Bottle Up' (written by Stanley Garland)
'Jukebox Argument' (written by Gary Nicholson)
'Million Dollar Memories' (written by David Allan Coe and Carol Anderson)
'Blame Lies With Me' (written by Sterling Whipple)
'Lyin' Again' (written by Larry Butler and Chips Moman)
'So Easy to Begin' (written by Jules Shear)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'That's All That Matters to Me' (Epic Records, 1980) included the following:

Barry Burton, Paul Worley, Mark Casstevens and Rafe VanHoy (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Osborn and Mike Leech (bass)
Eddie Bayers, Kenneth Buttrey and Larrie London (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Ron Levine (fiddle)
Dennis Burnside and Tony Migliore (piano)
The Sheldon Kurland Strings (strings)
Diane Tidwell, Donna Levine, Orsa Lia, Phil Forrest, Sheri Kramer, Terry Dearmore and Tom Brannon (vocals)
Bergen White, Dennis Burnside and Mike Leech (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'That's All That Matters to Me' (Epic Records, 1980), which was recorded, in 1979, at Audio Media Studio in Nashville, and Richey House Studio in Nashville, reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980, and No.177 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music albums chart in 1980.

Various Artists: 'Urban Cowboy' (Elektra Records, 1980)

On Friday 6 June 1980, the soundtrack for 'Urban Cowboy' (Elektra Records, 1980), which included the following tracks:

'Hello Texas' (written by Brian Collins and Robby Campbell) / performed by Jimmy Buffett
'All Night Long' (written by Joe Walsh) / performed by Joe Walsh
'Times Like These', which was written by Dan Fogelberg (Monday 13 August 1951 - Sunday 16 December 2007) / performed by Dan Fogelberg
'Nine Tonight' (written by Bob Seger) / performed by Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band
'Stand By Me' (written by Ben E. King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller) / performed by Mickey Gilley (No.1 for one week in August 1980)
'Cherokee Fiddle' (written by Michael Martin Murphey) / performed by Johnny Lee (No.10, 1982)
'Could I Have This Dance' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Bobby Lee House (Friday 11 February 1949 - Thursday 25 November 2004) / performed by Anne Murray (No.1 for one week in November 1980)
'Lyin' Eyes', which was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey (Saturday 6 November 1948 - Tuesday 19 January 2016) / performed by Eagles (No.8, 1975)
'Lookin' For Love' (written by Bob Morrison, Wanda Mallette and Patti Ryan) / performed by Johnny Lee (No.1 for three weeks in September 1980)
'Don't It Make Ya Wanna Dance' (written by Rusty Wier) / performed by Bonnie Raitt
'The Devil Went Down to Georgia' (written by Charlie Daniels, Tom Crain, Taz DiGregorio, Fred Edwards, Charlie Hayward and Jim Marshall) / performed by The Charlie Daniels Band (No.1 for one week in August / September 1979)
'Here Comes The Hurt Again' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) / performed by Mickey Gilley (No.9, 1978)
'Orange Blossom Special / Hoedown' (written by Ervin T. Rouse) / performed by Gilley's 'Urban Cowboy' Band
'Love The World Away', which was written by Bob Morrison and Johnny Wilson / performed by Kenny Rogers
'Falling in Love For The Night' (written by Charlie Daniels) / performed by The Charlie Daniels Band
'Darlin' (written by Oscar Stuart Blandamer) / performed by Bonnie Raitt
'Look What You've Done to Me' (written by Boz Scaggs and David Foster) / performed by Boz Scaggs
'Hearts Against The Wind' (written by JD Souther) / performed by JD Souther and Linda Ronstadt
'Rockin' My Life Away', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004) / performed by Mickey Gilley
'The Moon Just Turned Blue' (written by JD Souther) / performed by JD Souther
'Jukebox Argument' (written by Gary Nicholson) / performed by Mickey Gilley / this track was an album track from 1980
'Here You Come Again' (written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil) / performed by Gilley's 'Urban Cowboy' Band
'Cotton-Eyed Joe' (traditional) / performed by Bayou City Beats
'Texas' (written by Charlie Daniels) / performed by The Charlie Daniels Band
'Honky Tonk Wine', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004) / performed by Mack Vickery
'Rode Hard & Put Up Wet' (written by Marshall Chapman) / performed by Johnny Lee
'Mamma's Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce) / performed by Mickey Gilley and Johnny Lee
'The Eyes of Texas' (Urban Cowboy Breakdown) (written by J.L. Sinclair) / performed by The Charlie Daniels Band
'Orange Blossom Special' / performed by Gilley's 'Urban Cowboy' Band / this track earned Gilley's 'Urban Cowboy' Band a trophy for 'Best Country Instrumental Performance

Mickey Gilley: 'Encore' (Epic Records, 1980)

In October 1980, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Encore' (Epic Records, 1980), which was produced by Eddie Killroy, and included the following tracks:

'Stand By Me' (written by Ben E. King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller) (No.1 for one week in August 1980) / this track also reached No.22 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'Here Comes The Hurt Again' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.9, 1978)
'Just Long Enough to Say Goodbye' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.10, 1979)
'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (No.1 for one week in June 1975)
'The Song We Made Love To' (written by Kenneth Wahle) (No.13, 1978)
'Don't The Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time' (written by Baker Knight) (No.1 for one week in May 1976)
'Overnight Sensation' (written by Bob McDill) (No.7, 1975) / this track was a duet with Barbi Benton
'I Overlooked An Orchid', which was written by Carl Story (Monday 29 May 1916 - Friday 31 March 1995), Shirl Lyn and Carl Smith (Tuesday 15 March 1927 - Saturday 16 January 2010) (No.1 for one week in November 1974)
'Bouquet of Roses', which was written by Bob Hilliard (Monday 28 January 1918 - Monday 1 February 1971) and Steve Nelson (No.11, 1975)

Mickey Gilley's 'Encore' (Epic Records, 1980) reached No.14 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Mickey Gilley: 'You Don't Know Me' (Epic Records, 1981)

In July 1981, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'You Don't Know Me' (Epic Records, 1981), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You Don't Know Me', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) and Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008) (No.1 for one week in September 1981) / this track also reached No.55 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1981
'Lonely Nights' (written by Keith Stegall and Stewart Harris) (No.1 for one week in February 1982) / Keith Stegall worked at this time with April / Blackwood Music, duping and dellivering tapes copies for the company during the day, writing mostly in the evenings. Roger Murrah was his mentor at the company, and Keith Stegall wrote 'Lonely Nights' on Roger Murrah's piano.
'Tears of The Lonely' (written by Wayland Holyfield) (No.3, 1981)

Mickey Gilley's 'You Don't Know Me' (Epic Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'Ladies Night' (written by Gary Nicholson)
'My Affection' (written by
Delbert McClinton)
'Drinking Old Memories Down' (written by
Stanley Garland)
'She Left You (A Long Time Ago)' (written by
Jeff Tweel)
'We've Watched Another Evening Waste Away' (written by 
Steve Michaels)
'Learning to Live Without You' (written by 
Steve Michaels)
'Clinging to a Memory'
(written by Chick Rains)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'You Don't Know Me' (Epic Records, 1981) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Paul Worley and Rafe VanHoy (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Osborne and Mike Leech (bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Dennis Burnside (piano, keyboards)
Tony Magliore (piano)
Diane Tidwell, Phil Forrest, Sheri Huffman and Tom Brannon (vocals)
Bergen White and Dennis Burnside (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'You Don't Know Me' (Epic Records, 1981), which was recorded, in 1981, at Audio Media Recorders in Nashville, reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981, and No.170 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music albums chart in 1981.

Mickey Gilley: 'Christmas at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1981)

In November 1981, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Christmas at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1981), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included the following tracks:

'Don't The Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time' (written by Baker Knight) (No.1 for one week in May 1976)
'Blue Christmas' (written by Bill Hayes and Jay Johnson)
'Jingle Bell Rock' (written by Joe Beal and Jim Boothe)
'Home to Texas For Christmas' (written by Gary Nicholson, Sandy Pinkard and Edward Atchley)
'Honky Tonk Christmas', which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016), Zack Turner and Buddy Brocks
'Old Christmas Card' (written by Vaughn Horton)
'White Christmas' (written by Irving Berlin)
'Silver Bells' (written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans)
'I'll Be Home For Christmas', which was written by Kim Gannon, Walter Kent and Buck Ram (Thursday 21 November 1907 - Tuesday 1 January 1991)
'I'm Spending Christmas With You' (written by Penny Roberts and Sharon Conway)

Mickey Gilley's 'Christmas at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1981) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

Mickey Gilley: 'Put Your Dreams Away' (Epic Records, 1982)

In July 1982, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Put Your Dreams Away' (Epic Records, 1982), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Put Your Dreams Away' (written by Richard Leigh and Wayland Holyfield) (No.1 for one week in October 1982)
'Talk to Me' (written by Joe Seneca) (No.1 for one week in January / February 1983) / this track also reached No.106 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music singles chart in 1983

Mickey Gilley's 'Put Your Dreams Away' (Epic Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'Don't You Be Fooling With a Fool' (written by Lewis Anderson)
'I Really Don't Want to Know', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Howard Barnes
'If I Can't Hold Her on The Outside' (written by Stephen Griggs)
'Texas Heartache No.1' (written by Paul Hotchkiss and Mike Terry)
'She Beats All I've Ever Seen' (written by Don Singleton)
'Beginning of The End' (written by Rafe VanHoy)
'Honky Tonkin' (Guess I Done Some)' (written by Delbert McClinton)
'Rocky Road to Romance' (written by Rafe VanHoy, Deborah Allen and Rosetta Posey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Put Your Dreams Away' (Epic Records, 1982) included the following:

Paul Worley and Rafe VanHoy (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Osborn (bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Hoot Hester (Monday 13 August 1951 - Tuesday 30 August 2016) (fiddle)
Tony Migliore (piano)
Dennis Burnside (keyboards)
The Nashville String Machine (strings)
Dennis Burnsid, Tom Brannon, Phil Forrest, Sheri Huffman, Diane Tidwell and Lori Westerman Brooks (vocals)
Bergen White (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'Put Your Dreams Away' (Epic Records, 1982), which was recorded, in April 1982, at Audio Media Recorders in Nashville, and at Bullet Recording Studio in Nashville, reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Mickey Gilley: 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982)

In September 1982, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982), which was produced by Eddie Killroy and Jim Ed Norman, and included the following tracks:

'True Love Ways', which was written by Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Norman Petty (Wednesday 25 May 1927 - Wednesday 15 August 1984) (No.1 for one week in July 1980) / this track also reached No.66 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'Power of Positive Drinking', which was written by Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Rick Klang (No.8, 1978)
'A Headache Tomorrow (or a Heartache Tonight)' (written by Chick Rains) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1981)
'Chains of Love' (written by A. Nugetre and Harry VanWalls) (No.9, 1977)
'Tears of The Lonely' (written by Wayland Holyfield) (No.3, 1981)
'Stand By Me' (written by Ben E. King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller) (No.1 for one week in August 1980) / this track also reached No.22 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'My Affection' (written byDelbert McClinton) / this track was an album track from 1981
'That's All That Matters to Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in December 1980)
'Lonely Nights' (written by Keith Stegall and Stewart Harris) (No.1 for one week in February 1982)
'You Don't Know Me', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) and Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008) (No.1 for one week in September 1981) / this track also reached No.55 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1981

Mickey Gilley's 'Biggest Hits' (Epic Records, 1982) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

Mickey Gilley: 'Fool For Your Love' (Epic Records, 1983)

In April 1983, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Fool For Your Love' (Epic Records, 1983), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Fool For Your Love' (written by Don Singleton) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1983)
'Your Love Shines Through' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Gary Nicholson) (No.5, 1983)

Mickey Gilley's 'Fool For Your Love' (Epic Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Gonna Love You Right Out of The Blues' (written by Walt Aldridge and Tom Brasfield)
'Wish You Were Mine Again' (written by 
Don Lowery and Lewis Anderson)
'It's Just a Matter of Time', which was written by 
Clyde Otis (Thursday 11 September 1924 - Tuesday 8 January 2008), Brook Benton (Saturday 19 September 1931 - Saturday 9 April 1988) and Belford Hendricks (Tuesday 11 May 1909 - Saturday 24 September 1977)
'Little Heaven's Rubbing Off on Me' (written by Gene Dobbins and John Scott Sherrill)
'Shakin' a Heartache', which was written by Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Gary Nicholson
'I Don't Want to Hear it Anymore' (written by Glen Clark)
'Pretending' (written by Don Singleton)
'Ruby Louise' (written by Delbert McClinton)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Fool For Your Love' (Epic Records, 1983) included the following:

Paul Worley and Rafe VanHoy (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Osborn (bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Tony Migliore (piano)
Dennis Burnside (keyboards)
Don Sheffield (trumpet)
Bill Puett and Don Jackson (sax)
Dennis Good (trombone)
The Nashville String Machine (Carl Gorodetzky) (strings)
Tom Brannon, Phil Forset, Sheri Huffman, Lisa Silver, Paul Worley, Dennis Wilson and Don Gant (vocals)

Mickey Gilley's 'Fool For Your Love' (Epic Records, 1983), which was recorded, in 1983, at Woodland Sound Studio in Nashville, reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Mickey Gilley: 'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (Epic Records, 1983)

In November 1983, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (Epic Records, 1983), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (written by Smokey Robinson) (No.2, 1983)

Mickey Gilley's 'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (Epic Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'Then You Can Tell Goodbye', which was written by John D. Loudermilk (Saturday 31 March 1934 - Wednesday 21 September 2016)
'Easy Come, Hard to Go' (written by 
Pat Alger and Rick Beresford)
'You Look So Good in Love' (written by 
Rory Bourke, Kerry Chater and Glen Ballard)
'I Don't Want to Lose Your Love' (written by 
Joey Carbone)
'Good Lookin' Texas Women' (written by 
Jimmy Hydrick and Wendel Adkins)
'Giving Up On Getting Over You' (written by 
Gary Nicholson, Chick Rains and Robb Strandlund)
'Slow Down', which was written by 
Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), Mark Sherrill and Lacy J. Dalton
''She Got The Green & I Got The Blues' (written by 
Robert Byrne and David Shulman)
'You Never Cross My Mind', which was written by 
Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016), Rafe VanHoy and Deborah Allen

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (Epic Records, 1983) included the following:

Paul Worley, Byrd Burton and Rafe VanHoy (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Osborne and Mike Leech (bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Dennis Burnside (piano, keyboards)
Tony Magliore (piano)
Sheldon Kurland Strings (strings)
Diane Tidwell, Phil Forrest, Sheri Huffman, Tom Brannon, Lisa Silver, Dennis Wilson and Don Gant (vocals)
Bergen White and Tom Brannon (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (Epic Records, 1983), which was recorded, in August 1983, at Audio Media Recorders in Nashville, reached No.48 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

Mickey Gilley & Charly McClain: 'It Takes Believers' (Epic Records, 1984)

In April 1984, Mickey Gilley & Charly McClain saw the release of 'It Takes Believers' (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Norro Wilson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Paradise Tonight' (written by Mark Wright and Bill Kenner) (No.1 for one week in October 1983)
'Candy Man', which was written by Baverly Ross and Fred Neil)
(No.5, 1984)
'Right Stuff' (written by Bobby Fisher, Rick Giles and Bill Haynes) (No.14, 1984)

Mickey Gilley & Charly McClain's 'It Takes Believers' (Epic Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'Touch Me When We're Dancing' (written by Jerry Wallace, Terry Skinner and Ken Bell)
'Playboy' (written by 
Brian Holland, William Stevenson and Robert Bateman)
'We Got a Love Thing' (written by 
Norro Wilson and Steve Davis)
'Heads I Go, Hearts I Stay' (written by 
Wayland Holyfield)
'Hold On to The Feeling' (written by 
Lisa Silver, Marybeth Anderson and Bruce Dees)
'It Takes Believers to Be Lovers' (written by 
Mark Wright, Bill Kenner and Warren Peterson)
'Phone Call' (written by 
Even Stevens and Billy Joe Walker)

Mickey Gilley & Charly McClain's 'It Takes Believers' (Epic Records, 1984), which was recorded, in November 1983, in Nashville, reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Mickey Gilley: 'Too Good to Stop Now' (Epic Records, 1984)

In July 1984, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Too Good to Stop Now' (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Too Good to Stop Now' (written by Bob McDill and Rory Bourke) (No.4, 1984)
'I'm The One Mama Warned You About' (written by 
Mickey James and Gail Zeiler) (No.10, 1984)

Mickey Gilley's 'Too Good to Stop Now' (Epic Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'Make It Like The First Time' (written by 
Johnny Cunningham)
'Shoulder to Cry On' (written by Donald Miller and Ron Birmann)
'When She Runs Out of Fools' (written by 
Steve Pippin and Steve Jobe)
'Right Side of The Wrong Bed' (written by 
Fred Knipe, Stephen Chandler and Duncan Stitt)
'Everything I Own' (written by 
David Gates)
'Reminders', which was written by 
Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001)
'You Can Lie to Me Tonight' (written by 
Kerry Chater and Tom Campbell)
'Quittin' Time' (written by 
Michael Garvin, Ron Hellard and Bucky Jones)

Mickey Gilley's 'Too Good to Stop Now' (Epic Records, 1984), which was recorded, in April 1984, at Audio Media Recorders in Nashville, reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

Ray Charles: 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984)

In August 1984, Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004) saw the release of 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984), a duets album project, which featured Mickey Gilley on 'It Ain't Gonna Worry My Mind', which was written by Richard Leigh.

Mickey Gilley: 'Ten Years of Hits' (Epic Records, 1984)

In October 1984, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Ten Years of Hits' (Epic Records, 1984), which was produced by Eddie Killroy and Jim Ed Norman, and included the following tracks:

'Room Full of Roses' (written by Tim Spencer) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1974) / this track also reached No.50 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1974
'I Overlooked An Orchid', which was written by Carl Story (Monday 29 May 1916 - Friday 31 March 1995), Shirl Lyn and Carl Smith (Tuesday 15 March 1927 - Saturday 16 January 2010) (No.1 for one week in November 1974)
'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (No.1 for one week in June 1975)
'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson(No.1 for one week in February 1975)
'Tears of The Lonely' (written by Wayland Holyfield) (No.3, 1981)
'Stand By Me' (written by Ben E. King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller) (No.1 for one week in August 1980) / this track also reached No.22 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'True Love Ways', which was written by Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Norman Petty (Wednesday 25 May 1927 - Wednesday 15 August 1984) (No.1 for one week in July 1980) / this track also reached No.66 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'That's All That Matters to Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in December 1980)
'A Headache Tomorrow (or a Heartache Tonight)' (written by Chick Rains) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1981)
'You Don't Know Me', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) and Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008) (No.1 for one week in September 1981) / this track also reached No.55 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1981
'Bring It On Home to Me', which was written by Sam Cooke (Sam Cook (Thursday 22 January 1931 - Friday 11 December 1964) (No.1 for one week in August 1976)
'Lawdy Miss Clawdy' (written by Lloyd Price) (No.3, 1976)
'She's Pulling Me Back Again' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1977)
'Chains of Love' (written by A. Nugetre and Harry VanWalls) (No.9, 1977)
'Power of Positive Drinking', which was written by Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Rick Klang (No.8, 1978)
'Lonely Nights' (written by Keith Stegall and Stewart Harris) (No.1 for one week in February 1982)
'Put Your Dreams Away' (written by Richard Leigh and Wayland Holyfield) (No.1 for one week in October 1982)
'Talk to Me' (written by Joe Seneca) (No.1 for one week in January / February 1983)
'You've Really Got a Hold on Me' (written by Smokey Robinson) (No.2, 1983)

Mickey Gilley's 'Ten Years of Hits' (Epic Records, 1984) reached No.56 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

T. Graham Brown: 'I Tell It Like It Used to Be' (Capitol Records, 1985)

In 1985, Mickey Gilley recorded 'I Tell It Like It Used to Be' (written by Ron Hellard, Michael Garvin and Bucky Jones), but his version remained unreleased until 2017.

'I Tell It Like It Used to Be' (written by Ron Hellard, Michael Garvin and Bucky Jones) was also recorded by T. Graham Brown, who included the track on 'I Tell It Like It Used to Be' (Capitol Records, 1985); T. Graham Brown's version reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in the fall of 1985.

Mickey Gilley: 'Live at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1985)

In March 1985, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Live at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1985), which was produced by John Boylan, and included the following tracks:

'Don't The Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time' (written by Baker Knight) (No.1 for one week in May 1976)
'Blaze of Glory' (written by Danny Morrison, Johnny Slate and Larry Keith)
'I Was Born a Dreamer' (written by Michael Lloyd and Mark Fleischer)
'Hold On to The Feeling' (written by Lisa Silver, Marybeth Anderson and Bruce Dees)

'When She Runs Out of Fools' (written by Steve Pippin and Steve Jobe)
'Great Balls of Fire', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Earl Solomon Burroughs (Jack Hammer) (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Friday 8 April 2016)
'Full Grown Fool' (written by Allen Reynolds and Kay Taylor)
'My Affection' (written by Delbert McClinton)
'Your Love Shies Through / Tears of The Lonely / Lonely Nights / Put Your Dreams Away' (medley)
'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) (No.1 for one week in June 1975)
'Diggy Liggy Lo' (written by Jimmy D. Miller)

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Live at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1985) included Anne Marie Ciancilo on harmony vocals.

Mickey Gilley's 'Live at Gilley's' (Epic Records, 1985), which was recorded 'live', in December 1984, at Gilley's in Dallas, Texas, reached No.53 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

Mickey Gilley: 'I Feel Good About Lovin' You' (Epic Records, 1985)

In October 1985, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'I Feel Good About Lovin' You' (Epic Records, 1985), which was produced by Norro Wilson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You've Got Something on Your Mind' (written by Roger Murrah, Norro Wilson and Dave Gibson) (No.10, 1985)
'Your Memory Ain't What It Used to Be' (written by Mary Fielder, Kim Morrison and Dickey Betts) (No.5, 1985)

Mickey Gilley's 'I Feel Good About Lovin' You' (Epic Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

'Have a Little Faith' (written by Steve Davis and Dennis Morgan)
'You Need a Lady in Your Life' (written by 
Tom Grant and Eddie Burton)
'(I'm Gonna) Justify Your Love For Me' (written by 
Wayland Holyfield)
'One Monkey Don't Stop No Show' (written by 
David Wilkins and Tim Marshall)
'Full Grown Fool'
(written by Allen Reynolds and Kay Taylor)
'I Feel Good About Lovin' You' (written by 
David Wilkins and Jody Johnson)
'It's Love' (written by 
David Wilkins)
'Lonely Nights, Lonely Heartache' 
(written by Mark Oliverius)

Mickey Gilley's 'I Feel Good About Lovin' You' (Epic Records, 1985), which was recorded, in June 1985, at Merit Recording Studio in Nashville, and Gilley's Studio in Pasadena, Texas, reached No.40 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

Mickey Gilley: 'One & Only' (Epic Records, 1986)

In July 1986, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'One & Only' (Epic Records, 1986), which was produced by Norro Wilson, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Doo Wah Days' (written by Doug Gilmore, Ed Hunnicut and Gary Vincent) (No.6, 1986)

Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'One & Only' (Epic Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

'Play Ruby Play' (written by Troy Seals and Tony Brown)
'How Long'
'Stagger Lee' (written by Lloyd Price and Harold Logan)
'Let Me Rescue You' (written by Jim Hurt and Robert Simon)
'After She's Gone'
'Wall of Tears' (written by Richard Leigh and Peter McCann)
'In His Hands'
'Too Many Memories'
'To My One & Only' (written by David Wilkins)

Mickey Gilley's 'One & Only' (Epic Records, 1986), which was recorded, in April 1986, at Music City Music Hall in Nashville, and Merit Studio in Nashville, reached No.40 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

Mickey Gilley: 'Back to Basics' (Epic Records, 1987)

In February 1987, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Back to Basics' (Epic Records, 1987), which was produced by John Boylan, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Full Grown Fool' (written by Allen Reynolds and Kay Taylor) (No.16, 1987)

Mickey Gilley's 'Back to Basics' (Epic Records, 1987) also which was produced by John Boylan, and included the following tracks:

'Doo Wah Days' (written by Doug Gilmore, Ed Hunnicut and Gary Vincent)
'My Affection' (written by Delbert McClinton)
'Swinging Doors', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Play Ruby Play' (written by Troy Seals and Tony Brown)
'Window Up Above', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'I'll Sail My Ship Alone' (written by Lois Mann, Henry Bernard and Murray Burns)
'Faded Love', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and John Wills
'Great Balls of Fire', which was written by Otis Blackwell (Monday 16 February 1931 - Monday 6 May 2002) and Earl Solomon Burroughs (Jack Hammer) (Wednesday 16 September 1925 - Friday 8 April 2016)
'Diggy Liggy Lo' (written by Jimmy D. Miller)

Mickey Gilley: 'Chasing Rainbows' (Airbone Records, 1988)

In October 1988, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Chasing Rainbows' (Airbone Records, 1988), which was produced by Larry Butler, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm Your Puppet' (written by Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham) (No.49, 1988)
'She Reminded Me of You' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Peter McCann) (No.23, 1988)
'You've Still Got a Place in My Heart' (written by Ron Moore and Robert Parker) (No.62, 1989)
'There I've Said It Again' (written by Redd Evans and Dave Mann) (No.53, 1989)

Mickey Gilley's 'Chasing Rainbows' (Airbone Records, 1988) also which was produced by Larry Butler, and included the following tracks:

'Chasin' Rainbows' (written by James Johnsopn and Charles Vassy)
'Me & The Blues' (written by Pat McManus and Michael Heeney)
'Baby, I Feel For You' (written by Larry Butler, Dean Dillon and Bud McGuire)
'Easy Climb' (written by Roger Murrah)
'It's Killing Me to Watch Love Die' (written by Don Goodman and John Wesley Ryles)
'Couldn't Love Have Picked a Better Place to Die', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Bucky Jones

Mickey Gilley's 'Chasing Rainbows' (Airbone Records, 1988) was recorded, in April 1988 at Music Mill in Nashville.

Mickey Gilley: 'Make It Like The First Time' (Branson Entertainment, 1993)

In July 1993, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Make It Like The First Time' (Branson Entertainment, 1993), which was produced by Ed Keeley and Tony Migliore, and included the following tracks:

'Stand By Me' (written by Ben E. King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller) (No.1 for one week in August 1980) / this track also reached No.22 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'Fool For Your Love' (written by Don Singleton) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1983)
'That's All That Matters to Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) (No.1 for one week in December 1980)
'Room Full of Roses' (written by Tim Spencer) (No.1 for one week in June / July 1974) / this track also reached No.50 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1974)
'Put Your Dreams Away' (written by Richard Leigh and Wayland Holyfield) (No.1 for one week in October 1982)
'True Love Ways', which was written by Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Norman Petty (Wednesday 25 May 1927 - Wednesday 15 August 1984) (No.1 for one week in July 1980) / this track also reached No.66 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1980
'She's Pulling Me Back Again' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1977)
'You Need a Lady in Your Life' (written by Tom Grant and Eddie Burton) / this track was an album track from 1985
'Make It Like The First Time' (written by Johnny Cunningham) / this track was an album track from 1984
'Last Dance with You', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999), Dennis Knutson and Eddie Burton
'Object of My Affection' (written by Pinky Tomlin, Coy Poe and Jimmie Grier)
'Don't The Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time' (written by Baker Knight) (No.1 for one week in May 1976) / this track, which was named 'Song of the Year' at the Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards in May 1977, was originally offered to Gene Watson, but he decided not to record it

Personnel involved in the recording of Mickey Gilley's 'Make It Like The First Time' (Branson Entertainment, 1993) included the following:

Mickey Gilley (vocals, piano)
Mike Severs and Pete Bordonali (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Gary Lunn and Ralph Childs (bass)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Tony Migliore (keyboards)
Denis Solee (sax)
Carl Gorodetzky, Conni Ellisor, Lee Larrison, Pamela Sixfin and Theodore Madsen (strings)
Debra Black, Doug Clements, Sue Ellen Dockery and Lori Brooks (vocals)
Tony Migliore (arrangements)

Mickey Gilley's 'Make It Like The First Time' (Branson Entertainment, 1993) was recorded, in May 1993 at Chelsea Studio in Nashville.

Mickey Gilley: 'Invitation Only' (Varèse Sarabande Records, 2003)

On Tuesday 20 May 2003, Mickey Gilley saw the release of 'Invitation Only' (Varèse Sarabande Records, 2003), which was recorded in 1991 and produced by Larry Butler, included the following tracks:

'If I Didn't Know Your Memory Loved Jamaica'
'All I've Got Against Him is You'
'Dancing to The Beat of a Broken Heart'
'Keep The Night Away'
'Invitation Only'
'All Night Long'
'Sadly Ever After'
'Sure Got This Old Redneck Feeling Blue'
'God's Country'
'Under a Blue Moon Tonight'

Today, Mickey Gilley walks out on the stage and continues to sing his hit singles and share his musical career.  The show is full of stories, music and tender moments.

Mickey Gilley's number one love is his music, but he continues to give back to the community he lives in.  He received the Pioneer Award, which was presented to him by Branson Area Chamber of Commerce, and he participates in local benefits and veteran shows, and promotes Branson all over the United States.
Gene Watson & Mickey Gilley at American Music Theatre in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on Sunday 13 July 2014

• Visit Mickey's Official Site at gilleys.com
• Visit Mickey Gilley's Personal Page on Facebook

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