• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Tommy Allsup, which he submitted to this site on Thursday 17 April 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Tommy Allsup who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Tommy Allsup
This quote was submitted on Thursday 17 April 2014.



'I was the session leader and arranger on Gene's 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' session.

In Nashville, back in those days, it was easy to record four songs in a three hour session.

We had recorded the first three songs and only had about fifteen minutes left on the session.

We only made two takes on this song.

We made one take, heard a playback, and we changed the fiddle part, which was played by Buddy Spicher.

We put in a line for Hershal Wigginton, the bass singer for Nashville Edition Singers.

So we made the take and the record was a hit.



On the second Gene Watson session for Capitol Records, we recorded 'Paper Rosie' (written by Dallas Harms).

This too made it to No.1.

On Gene's later sessions for Capitol Records, he had a new session leader, Harold Bradley, a dear friend of mine and a great guitar player.

Gene and I have been good friends for forty-plus years.



He was a guest vocalist on the last Texas Playboy LP honouring Bob Wills' 100th birthday.

Gene is still in my top country favourites of all time, and I would know, I've worked with all the greats!'

Thank you, Tommy Allsup, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Tommy Allsup...

Tommy Allsup was born in Owasso, Oklahoma on Sunday 24 November 1931 and started his musical career in Claremore, Oklahoma in 1949 with The Oklahoma Swingbillies'.

In 1950, Tommy Allsup went to work with fiddle player Art Davis in Miami, Oklahoma; from there he went to The Cowboy Inn in Wichita, Kansas with singer and fiddle player Jimmy Hall.

In 1952 and 1953, Tommy Allsup moved back to Tulsa, Oklahoma to join The Johnnie Lee Wills Band'; Johnnie Lee Wills (Monday 2 September 1912 - Thursday 25 October 1984).

From 1953 until 1958, Tommy Allsup had his own band, 'The Southernaires', in Lawton, Oklahoma with homebase being The Southern Club.

In 1958, Tommy Allsup's career would take a different direction. On a trip to Clovis, New Mexico to record at Norman Petty's famous studio, Tommy met Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959).

In April 1958, Tommy Allsup started playing lead guitar with Buddy Holly and The Crickets. Tommy continued playing with Buddy Holly until Tuesday 3 February 1959, 'The Day The Music Died', when the fatal plane crash claimed Buddy's life, along with those of J.P. 'The Big Bopper' Richardson (Friday 24 October 1930 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) and Ritchie Valens (Tuesday 13 May 1941 - Tuesday 3 February 1959).

Following Buddy Holly's death, Tommy Allsup moved to California and joined Liberty Records as A&R Director of all country music product, where he began producing Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) & The Texas Playboys.

Tommy Allsup's association with Bob Wills lasted through until Wills' 'For The Last Time' (United Artists Records, 1974), which was recorded on Sunday 2/Monday 3 December 1973 in Dallas, Texas a city in which Bob Wills recorded his first records in 1935.

Tommy Allsup used some of the original Texas Playboys on the last recording (Leon McAulliff, Eldon Shamblin, Smokey Dacus and Al Strickland). Bob Wills directed the sessions from his wheel chair.

While at Liberty Records, Tommy Allsup produced Tex Williams (Thursday 23 August 1917 - Friday 11 October 1985), Willie Nelson, Joe Carson, Warren Smith (Sunday 7 February 1932 - Wednesday 30 January 1980), Billy Mize and Cliff Crofford (1929 - Sunday 22 November 2009).

In July 1963, Tex Williams (Thursday 23 August 1917 - Friday 11 October 1985) saw the release of 'Tex Williams In Las Vegas' (Liberty Records, 1963), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and included the following tracks:

'My Window Faces The South' (written by Jerry Livingston, Mitchell Parish and Abner Silver)
'Tomorrow's Just Another Day To Cry' (written by Red Hayes and Rosalie Allen)
'Wild Card' (written by Buddy Ebsen and Bonnie Lake)
'Dusty Skies', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'Time Changes Everything', which was written by Tommy Duncan (Wednesday 11 January 1911 - Tuesday 25 July 1967)
'You Can't Break My Heart', which was written by Spade Cooley (Saturday 17 December 1910 - Sunday 23 November 1969) and Stan Rogers
'Downtown Poker Club' (written by Billy Williams and W.H. Vodery)
'With Men Who Knows Tobacco Best' (written by Red Hayes)
'Ten Years' (written by Johnny Bond)
'Cowboy's Prayer' (written by Curley Fletcher and James Walker)
'Nine Pound Hammer', which was written by Merle Travis (Thursday 29 November 1917 - Thursday 20 October 1983)
'I'd Trade All Of My Tomorrows', which was written by Jenny Lou Carson (Wednesday 13 January 1915 - Saturday 16 December 1978)
'Little Dollie', which was written by Roger Murrah and Tex Williams (Thursday 23 August 1917 - Friday 11 October 1985)

In April 1966, Tex Williams (Thursday 23 August 1917 - Friday 11 October 1985) saw the release of 'Voice Of Authority' (Imperial Records, 1966), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and included the following tracks:

'Five Feet Deep In Teardrops' (written by Barry Mann and Larry Kolber)
'Late Movie', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'Empty Letter', which was written by Cliff Crofford (1929 - Sunday 22 November 2009)
'Pickin' White Gold', which was written by Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 - Saturday 17 July 2010)
'Where The Sad People Are' (written by Danny Dill)
'Between Today And Tomorrow' (written by Jeannie Seely)
'Suspicion' (written by Les Paul and Foster Carling)
'Closer Closer Closer' (written by Jerry Capehart)
'Long John', which was written by Eddie Miller and Skeets McDonald (Friday 1 October 1915 - Sunday 31 March 1968)
'Smokey Hollow', which was written by Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 - Saturday 17 July 2010)
'Hammer And Nails' (written by Aaron Schroeder and David Hill)
'You're Everywhere', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)

While at Liberty Records, Tommy Allsup also worked with great artists including Walter Brennan, Bobby Vee, Johnny Burnette, Julie London and Vickie Carr, who sang harmony with Bob Wills on the LP 'Bob Wills Sings And Plays' (Liberty Records, 1963).

After leaving California, Tommy Allsup moved to Nashville and headed up Metromedia Records in 1968.

In 1972, Tommy Allsup met Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel and produced their first album for United Artist Records, 'Comin' Right At Ya' (United Artists Records, 1973), which was recorded, in January 1973 at Woodland Sound Studio in Nashville and included the following tracks:

'Take Me Back To Tulsa', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and Tommy Duncan (Wednesday 11 January 1911 - Tuesday 25 July 1967)
'Daddy's Advice' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Before You Stopped Loving Me' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Drivin' Nails In My Coffin' (written by Jerry Irby)
'I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) and Fred Rose (24 August 1898 - Wednesday 1 December 1954)
'Space Buggy' (written by Leroy Preston, James Haber and Reuben Gosfield)
'Cherokee Boogie', which was written by Moon Mullican (Monday 29 March 1909 - Sunday 1 January 1967) and William Redbird
'Hillbilly Nut' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Your Downhome Is Uptown' (written by Leroy Preston, Ray Benson and Kevin Farrell)
'I'm The Fool (Who Told You To Go)' (written by Leroy Preston)
'I've Been Everywhere' (written by Geoff Mack)
'Sun Shines Down On Me', which was written by Larry Lee (1939 - Saturday 26 May 2001)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel's 'Comin' Right At Ya' (United Artists Records, 1973) included the following:

Ray Benson (vocal, guitar)
Leroy Preston (vocal, guitar, drums)
Chris O'Connell (vocals, guitar, banjo)
Lucky Oceans (steel guitar)
Gene Dobkin and Tony Garnier (bass)
Scott Hennige (drums)
Floyd Domino (piano)
Johnny Gimble (fiddle, mandolin)
Buddy Spicher, Daniel Levin and Andy Stein (fiddle)
Ed Vizard (saxophone)

In July 1975, Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel saw the release of 'Texas Gold' (Capitol Records, 1975), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and reached No.7 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart; the album included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Letter That Johnny Walker Read' (written by Leroy Preston, Ray Benson and Chris Frayne) (No.10, 1975)
'Nothing Takes The Place Of You' (written by Toussaint McCall and Patrick Robinson) (No.35, 1975)
'Bump Bounce Boogie' (written by Leroy Preston, Ray Benson and James Haber) (No.31, 1975)

Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel's 'Texas Gold' (Capitol Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Fat Boy Rag', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and L.R. Bernard
'Runnin' After Fools' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Let Me Go Home Whiskey' (written by Shifty Henry)
'Roll 'em Floyd' (written by Johnson Turner)
'Tonight The Bartender Is On The Wrong Side Of The Bar' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Where No One Stands Alone' (written by Mosie Lister)
'Trouble In Mind' (written by Richard M. Jones)

In August 1975, Gene Watson saw the release of 'Love In The Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975), which was produced by Russ Reeder and Bob Webster and reached No.5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1975 and included four tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Bad Water' (written by Jackie DeShannon and Holiday and Myers) (No.87, 1975)
'Love In The Hot Afternoon', which was written by Kent Westberry and Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003) (No.3, 1975)
'Where Love Begins' (written by Ray Griff) (No.5, 1975)
'You Could Know As Much About A Stranger' (written by Nadine Bryant) (No.10, 1975)

Gene Watson's debut album for Capitol Records, 'Love In The Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975) also included the following tracks:

'Through The Eyes Of Love', which was written by 'Cowboy' Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)
'Long Enough To Care' (written by Bobby Sykes)
'Harvest Time' (written by Bill Emerson, Lewis Moore and Carrol Dunham)
'This Just Ain't No Good Day For Leaving' (written by Dallas Frazier and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'For The First Time' (written by Jessi Colter)
'This Is My Year For Mexico', which was written by Vincent Wesley Matthews (1940 - Saturday 22 November 2003)

Personnel involved in the recording of Gene Watson's 'Love In The Hot Afternoon' (Capitol Records, 1975) included the following:

Tommy Allsup, Leon Rhodes and Charlie McCoy (rhythm guitar)
Jimmy Colbart, Pete Wade and Dale Sellers (lead guitar)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar, dobro)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica)
Charlie McCoy and Kenny Malone (marimba)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Joe Allen, Henry Strzelecki and Leon Rhodes (bass)
Kenny Malone, Jimmy Isabel and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Jerry Tuttle (horn)
The Nashville Edition (voices)

In May 1976, Gene Watson saw the release of 'Because You Believed In Me' (Capitol Records, 1976), which was produced by Russ Reeder and Bob Webster and reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1976 and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Because You Believed In Me', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999), Shorty Hall (Walter Harrison Hall) (Tuesday 5 April 1927 - Thursday 21 March 2002) and Gene Vowell (No.20, 1976)
'Her Body Couldn't Keep You Off My Mind' (written by Ray Griff) (No.52, 1976)

Gene Watson's 'Because You Believed In Me' (Capitol Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'If I'm A Fool For Leaving' (written by Skip Graves and Little Jimmy Dickens)
'Bitter They Are, Harder They Fall' (written by Larry Gatlin)
'When My World Left Town' (written by Tom Ghent and R. Paul)
'Sorry Willie', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'How Good A Bad Woman Feels' (written by Ray Griff)
'I Fell Apart', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'Hey Louella' (written by Ray Griff)
'And Then You Came Along' (written by Ray Griff)

Personnel involved in the recording of Gene Watson's 'Because You Believed In Me' (Capitol Records, 1976) included the following:

Tommy Allsup (rhythm guitar and bass guitar)
Leon Rhodes (rhythm guitar and lead guitar)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Joe Allen (bass)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Jimmy Colvard (1943 - 1977) and Pete Wade (lead guitar)
Jimmy Isbell, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Kenny Malone (drums)

In July 1976, Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel saw the release of 'Wheelin' & Dealin' (Capitol Records, 1976), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart; the album included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Route 66' (written by Bobby Troup) (No.48, 1976)
'Miles And Miles Of Texas' (written by Diane Johnson and Tommy Campfield) (No.38, 1976)

Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel's 'Wheelin' & Dealin' (Capitol Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Trouble With Loving Today' (written by Kevin Farrell)
'Shout Wa Hey' (written by Leroy Preston and James Haber)
'Blues For Dixie', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and O.W. Mayo
'Cajun Stripper' (written by Doug Kershaw and Rusty Kershaw)
'If I Can't Love You' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Lost Mind' (written by Percy Mayfield)
'They Raided The Joint' (written by David Eldridge and Oran Page)
'We've Gone As Far As We Can Do' (written by Linda Hargrove)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel's 'Wheelin' & Dealin' (Capitol Records, 1976) included the following:

Ray Benson, Leroy Preston and Chris O'Connell (vocal, guitar)
Eldon Shamblin, Bucky Meadows and Linda Hargrove (guitar)
Lucky Oceans (steel guitar)
Tony Garnier (bass)
Scott Hennige (drums)
Johnny Gimble and Bill Mabry (fiddle)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Floyd Domino (piano)
Jo-el Sonnier (accordion)
Danny Levin (flute, mandolin)
Link David (flute, saxophone)
Arnett Cobb and Dennis Solee (saxophone)

In September 1976, Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) saw the release of 'Back In The Swing Of Things' (Dot Records, 1976), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and reached No.48 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart; the album included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Honky Tonk Girl', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Chuck Hardin) (No.91, 1976)

Hank Thompson's 'Back In The Swing Of Things' (Dot Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Big Band Days' (written by Joe Allen)
'Forgive Me' (written by Jack Yellen and Milton Ager)
'Annie Over', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007), Billy Gray and Don Clay
'I'll Sign My Heart Away', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007)
'Three Little Swigs', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Ann Tygart
'Hangover Tavern', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007), Johnny Lowe and Mary Lowe
'Yesterday's Girl', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Billy Gray
'Another Shot Of Toddy', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Bill Penix
'Bring Back The Waltzes' (written by Red Steagall)
'Play For Me One Polka', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007)

In February 1977, Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel saw the release of 'The Wheel' (Capitol Records, 1977), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and included the following tracks:

'Wheel' (written by Leroy Preston) (instrumental)
'I Wonder' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Am I High' (written by Ray Benson, Chris O'Connell and Peter Sherridan)
'Dollar Short And A Day Late' (written by Leroy Preston, Ray Benson and Kevin Farrell)
'My Baby Thinks She's A Train' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Ragtime Annie' (traditional) (instrumental)
'When Love Goes Wrong' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Somebody Stole His Body' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Let's Face Up' (written by Leroy Preston and Kevin Farrell)
'I Can't Handle It Now' (written by Leroy Preston)
'Red Stick' (written by Link Davis)

In April 1977, Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) saw the release of 'The Thompson Touch' (Dot Records, 1977), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Just An Old Flame', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Bob Robinson (No.92, 1977)

Hank Thompson's 'The Thompson Touch' (Dot Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Don't Get Around Much Anymore' (written by Sidney Russell and Duke Ellington)
'She's Just A Whole Lot Like You', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007)
'Simple Simon Simple Heart', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007), Billy Gray and Bud Auge)
'It Gets More Like Monday Everyday', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Don McMillan
'Bummin' Around' (written by Pete Graves)
'Just One Step Away', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Billy Gray
'When You've Seen One Broken Heart', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and Hal Bynum
'Absent Minded Me', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007), Wes Stuart and Clifton Massey
'Comin' In For Rye', which was written by Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) and E.C. Wood

In October 1977, Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) saw the release of 'Doin' My Things' (Dot Records, 1977), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and included the following tracks:

'Cheaters Never Win'
'Window In My Heart'
'If I Had One Ounce Of Sense'
'Time Wounds All Heels'
'It's Five O'clock Somewhere'
'We Don't Love There Anymore'
'If Worst Comes To Worst'
'She Loves The One She's With'
'Ages And Ages Ago'
'Johnny On The Spot'

In July 1978, Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel saw the release of 'Collision Course' (Capitol Records, 1978), which was produced by Tommy Allsup and reached No.47 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart; the album included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Texas Me And You' (written by Leroy Preston, Ray Benson and Chris Frayne) (No.75, 1978)

Ray Benson & Asleep At The Wheel's 'Collision Course' (Capitol Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Pipe Dreams' (written by J.R. Chatwell)
'Song Of The Wanderer' (written by Neil Moret)
'Pine Grove Blues' (written by Nathan Abshire)
'One O'Clock Jump' (written by Count Basie)
'Louisiana 1927' (written by Randy Newman)
'Ruler Of My Heart' (written by Naomi Neville)
'Don't Forget The Trains' (written by Kevin Farrell)
'Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens' (written by Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer)
'Ghost Dancer' (written by Leroy Preston)

Tommy Allsup has also produced albums with The Original Texas Playboys, the great Western Swing vocalist Leon Rausch, Jody Nix, Curley Chalker, Mack Sanders and Johnny Bush.

On Thursday 15 March 2001, Tommy Allsup saw the release of 'True Love Ways' (Southland Records, 2001), which was dedicated to Maria Elena Holly and included the following tracks:

'True Love Ways'
'Sweet Dreams'
'I Love You Because'
'Am I Losing You'
'Four Walls'
'Hello Walls'
'Rose Coloured Glasses'
'It Don't Hurt Anymore'
'Four In The Morning'
'Detroit City'

On Tuesday 27 October 2005, Tommy Allsup was inducted into Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.

On Tuesday 8 November 2005, Tommy Allsup saw the release of the various artists compilation album, which he produced, 'Bob Wills’ A Tribute to Bob’s 100th Birthday' (Common Ground Records, 2005).

'Big Beaver' (written by Bob Wills) / recorded by Bob Wills in Saginaw, Texas on 16 April 1940 / performed by Leon Rausch, Tommy Allsup and The Texas Playboys

'New Worried Mind' (written by Davis-Daffin) / recorded by Bob Wills in Dallas, Texas on 24 February 1941 / performed by Leon Rausch

'Heart to Heart Talk' (written by Lee Ross) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 21 April 1960 / performed by Tanya Tucker

'Stay All Night' (written by Bob Wills and Tommy Duncan) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 26 January 1945 / performed by Charlie Daniels

'Misery' (written by Bob Wills, Tommy Duncan and Moore) / recorded by Bob Wills in Chicago, IL on 15 October 1947 / performed by Merle Haggard

'New San Antonio Rose' (written by Bob Wills) / recorded by Bob Wills in Saginaw, Texas on 16 April 1940 / performed by Robin English and Joe Diffie

'Turkey Texas Blues' (written by Billy Grammer) / recorded by Billy Grammer in Azle, Texas on 1 May 2004 / performed by Billy Grammer

'Milk Cow Blues' (written by Kokomo Arnold) / recorded by Johnnie Lee Wills in Dallas, Texas on 28 April 1941 / performed by Cody Canada

'Ten Years' (written by Johnny Bond) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 16 July 1942 / performed by Dierks Bentley

'Lilly Dale' (written by Billy Jack Wills and Tiny Moore) / recorded by Bob Wills in Nashville on 13 November 1956 / performed by Gene Watson

'Warm Red Wine', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 5 May 1949 / performed by Archie Bell

'I Want To Be Wanted' (written by Atcher) / recorded by Bob Wills in Dallas, Texas on 26 March 1952 / performed by Glen Campbell

'Snap Your Fingers' (written by Martin and Zanetis) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 8 May 1963 / performed by Terry Bradshaw and Rachel Bradshaw

'Keeper Of My Heart' (written by Jerry Irby and Bob Wills) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 12 November 1947 / performed by BJ Thomas

'Take Me Back To Tulsa' (written by Tommy Duncan and James Robert Wills) / recorded by Bob Wills in Dallas, Texas on 25 February 1941 / performed by Porter Wagoner (Friday 12 August 1927 - Sunday 28 October 2007), Tanya Tucker and Terry Bradshaw

'Across The Alley From The Alamo' (written by Joe Greene) / recorded by Bob Wills in Nashville on 16 April 1968 / performed by Wilford Brimley

'Faded Love' (written by John L. Wills and Bob Wills) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 27 April 1950 / performed by Johnny Rodriquez and Lynn Anderson

'Right Or Wrong' (written by Arthur Sizemore and Paul Biese) / recorded by Bob Wills in Chicago, IL on 30 September 1936 / performed by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)

'Sugar Moon' (written by Cindy Walker and Bob Wills) / recorded by Bob Wills in Hollywood, California on 5 September 1946 / performed by Larry Gatlin

'That's What I Like About The South' (written by Andy Razal) / recorded by Leon McAuliffe in Dallas, Texas on 30 November 1938 / performed by Chance of Muzik Mafia

'Bob's Got A Swing Band In Heaven' (written by Red Steagall) / performed by Red Steagall

Tommy Allsup got away from the hectic Nashville music scene and moved back to Texas, where he married in 2002 and opened up his own recording studio, 'Common Ground Studios', in Azle, Texas. According to Paul McCartney, Tommy Allsup is one of the finest guitar players in the world.

At the time of the acquisition of this Gene Watson 'Peer's Quote', in April 2014, Tommy Allsup had played guitar or bass on over six thousand-five hundred recording sessions.

In December 2013, Tommy Allsup saw the release of 'Raining In My Heart', which included the following tracks:

'Raining In My Heart'
'You Belong To Me'
'Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain'
'I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry'
'Mansion On The Hill'
'Swinging To The Beat'
'Ten Years'
'Right Or Wrong'
'A Party For The Old Folks'
'Tater Pie'
'A Big Rock In The Road'

Connect with Tommy Allsup at tommyallsup.net

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Gene Watson Fan Site