• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Steve Buckingham, which he submitted to this site on Wednesday 22 October 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Steve Buckingham who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Steve Buckingham
This quote was submitted on Wednesday 22 October 2014.

'Gene Watson has one of the great voices to ever sing country music.



I think anyone who has heard 'Love in the Hot Afternoon' or 'Farewell Party' would agree.



I produced several albums on Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) and she said more than once that Gene was one of her favourite singers.

That's pretty high praise!'

Thank you, Steve Buckingham, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Steve Buckingham...

Steve Buckingham is an American record producer, and four-time Grammy Aaward winner with twenty-seven No.1 singles to his credit. Steve has been awarded eleven Platinum and nineteen Gold albums. Steve Buckingham has produced Top 10 singles on eleven different charts: pop, country, rhythm and blues, jazz, adult contemporary, Americana, bluegrass, Christian, Hispanic, triple A and dance.

Among the varied artists Steve Buckingham has worked with are Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998), The Chieftains, Sinéad O'Connor, Bettye LaVette, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Yusuf Islam (Cat Stevens), Mindy Smith, Melissa Manchester, Ricky Skaggs, Dionne Warwick, Shania Twain, Maria McKee, Brenda Lee, Ricky Van Shelton, Joan Osborne, Loretta Lynn, jazz artists Kirk Whalum, Diane Schuur and Martin Taylor, and many others.

Guest artists on Steve Buckingham's projects have included Alison Krauss, Don Henley, John Hiatt, Norah Jones, Shelby Lynne, Nickel Creek, Patty Griffin, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Nanci Griffith, Bela Fleck, Tower of Power, Allison Moorer, John Popper, Rosanne Cash, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), Altan, Greg Allman, David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Kim Carnes, Willie Nelson, Vince Gill, The Winans, Patty Loveless, Larry Carlton, Isaac Hayes, Del McCoury, Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), Martina McBride, Buddy & Julie Miller, Emmylou Harris and countless others.

Steve Buckingham has also produced music for six motion pictures, as well as two CBS television specials.

The first record which Steve Buckingham produced (for The Lowery Group) was Alicia Bridges' 'I Love The Nightlife (Disco 'Round)' (written by Alicia Bridges and Susan Hutcheson) which, when released as a 12" single (as remixed by producer Jim Burgess), on Polydor Records, reached No.5 on the Billboard, Cash Box & Record World Charts in 1978 and quickly became a Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) certified 'Gold' record for sales of over one million copies.

Alicia Bridges released a second single shortly after; the rock-inflected 'Body Heat', which had the same strong backbeat as her big hit, but also featured more prominent rhythm guitar. 'Body Heat' became a minor hit, but it was the success of the first single which drove the album, which climbed the charts quickly and remained there for a total of thirty-five weeks.

Alicia Bridges was nominated for a Grammy Award and she performed the hit single as an opening act.

Personnel involved in the recording of Alicia Bridges' self-titled debut album, 'Alicia Bridges' (Polydor Records, 1978), included the following:

Alicia Bridges (lead and backing vocals)
Bernardine Mitchell, Keith 'Doc' Samuels and Vinni O'Neal (backing vocals)
Steve Buckingham and Ken Bell (guitars)
John Fristoe (guitars and backing vocals)
Randy McCormick (organ, piano, synthesizers, clavinet and melodica)
Alan Feingold and Steve McRay (organ)
Tom Robb (bass)
Roy Yeager (drums)
Mickey Buckins (percussion)

In 1984, Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001) saw the release of 'Righteous Anger' (MCA Records, 1984); one of the included tracks was 'What The Big Girls Do', which was written by Jan Buckingham, Steve Buckingham and Van Stephenson, and reached No.45 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1984.

In 1986, Sweethearts of The Rodeo (Janis Oliver & Kristine Arnold) saw the release of their self-titled debut album 'Sweethearts of The Rodeo' (Columbia Records, 1986), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and Hank DeVito, and included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Hey Doll Baby' (written by Titus Turner) (No.21, 1986)
'Since I Found You' (written by Bill Lloyd and Radney Foster) (No.7, 1986)
'Midnight Girl / Sunset Town' (written by Don Schlitz) (No.4, 1986)
'Chains of Gold' (written by Paul Kennerley) (No.4, 1987)
'Gotta Get Away' (written by Janis Oliver) (No.10, 1987)

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's self-titled debut album, 'Sweethearts of The Rodeo' (Columbia Records, 1986), also included the following tracks:

'Chosen Few' (written by John Hall and Don Schlitz)
'Everywhere I Turn' (written by Janis Oliver and Michael G. Joyce)
'I Can't Resist' (written by Hank DeVito and Rodney Crowell)

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's self-titled debut album 'Sweethearts of The Rodeo' (Columbia Records, 1986) reached No.8 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1986.

Tammy Wynette: 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987)

In 1987, Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and featured a special guest, or guests, on each track; the album included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Love' (written by Beckie Foster and Tommy Rocco) (No.12, 1987) / Background Harmony: Ricky Skaggs
'Talkin’ To Myself Again' (written by Jamie O'Hara) (No.16, 1987) / Background Harmony: The O’Kanes (Kieran Kane & Jamie O'Hara)
'Beneath A Painted Sky' (written by Joe Chambers and Bucky Jones) (No.25, 1988) / Background Harmony: Emmylou Harris

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'Tempted' (written by Al Turney) / Background Harmony: Gene Watson
'Some Things Will Never Change', which was written by Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Troy Seals) / Duet with Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009)
'I Wasn’t Meant To Live My Life Alone' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz) / Background Harmony: Vince Gill
'Higher Ground' (written by Steve Buckingham) / Background Harmonies: Larry Gatlin, Steve Gatlin & Rudy Gatlin
'A Slow Burning Fire' (written by Jan Buckingham and Valerie Smith) / Background Harmonies: Dennis Wilson, Harry Stinson, John Wesley Ryles and Ricky Van Shelton
'There’s No Heart So Strong' (written by Don Schlitz and Paul Overstreet) / Background Harmony: Paul Overstreet
'All Through Throwing Good Love After Bad' (written by Guy Clark and Richard Leigh) / Background Harmony: Rodney Crowell and Jeanne Smith

Additional personnel involved in the recording of Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) included the following:

Mark O'Connor (fiddle, mandolin & guitar)
Jerry Douglas (dobro)
Mark Casstevens, Steve Gibson, Steve Buckingham and Zane Ashton (guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar & dobro)
Tom Robb (bass)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Randy McCormick (piano)
Jay Spell (accordian)

Tammy Wynette's 'Higher Ground' (Epic Records, 1987) reached No.43 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

On Tuesday 26 May 1987, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of his debut album, 'Wild-Eyed Dream' (Columbia Records, 1987), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Wild-Eyed Dream' (written by Alan Rhody) (No.24, 1986)
'Crime Of Passion' (written by Walt Aldridge and Mac McAnally) (No.7, 1987)
'Somebody Lied' (written by Joe Chambers and Larry Jenkins) (No.1 for one week in December 1987)
'Life Turned Her That Way', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.1 for one week in March 1988)
'Don't We All Have The Right', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992) (No.1 for one week in July/August 1988)

Ricky Van Shelton's debut album, 'Wild-Eyed Dream' (Columbia Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'Ultimately Fine' (written by Samuel Lianas and Kurt Neumann)
'I Don't Care', which was written by Buck Owens (Monday 12 August 1929 - Saturday 25 March 2006)
'Baby, I'm Ready' (written by Floyd Wilson)
'Crazy Over You' (written by Radney Foster and Bill Lloyd)
'Workin' Man Blues', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ricky Van Shelton's debut album, 'Wild-Eyed Dream' (Columbia Records, 1987), included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Tommy Wells (drums)
Richard Bennett and Steve Buckingham (guitar)
Dennis Burnside, Randy McCormick and Tony Migliore (piano)
Larry Byrom and Don Potter (acoustic guitar)
Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar)
Hoot Hester (fiddle)
David Hungate, Tom Robb and Michael Rhodes (bass guitar)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
John Wesley Ryles, Bergen White and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Harry Stinson (percussion)

Ricky Van Shelton's debut album, 'Wild-Eyed Dream' (Columbia Records, 1987) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988 and was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on Monday 24 July 1989.

On Thursday 30 July 1987, Mary Chapin Carpenter saw the release of her debut album, 'Hometown Girl' (Columbia Records, 1987). The album did not produce any Billboard country music chart singles. All tracks on the album were produced by John Jennings, with the exception of the track 'Come On Home' (written by Pat Bunch, Mary Ann Kennedy and Pam Rose), which was produced by Steve Buckingham.

In 1988, Sweethearts of The Rodeo (Janis Oliver & Kristine Arnold) saw the release of their second album, 'One Time, One Night' (Columbia Records, 1988), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Satisfy You' (written by Janis Oliver and Don Schlitz) (No.5, 1988)
'Blue to The Bone' (written by Michael Garvin and Bucky Jones) (No.5, 1988)
'I Feel Fine', which was written by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980) Paul McCartney (No.9, 1988)
'If I Never See Midnight Again' (written by Don Schlitz and Craig Bickhardt) (No.39, 1989)

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's second album, 'One Time, One Night' (Columbia Records, 1988), also included the following tracks:

'We Won't Let That River Come Between Us' (written by Wally Wilson and Kevin Welch)
'So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad)' (written by Don Everly)
'Don't Look Down' (written by Wendy Waldman and Lindsey Buckingham)
'One Time, One Night' (written by David Hidalgo and Louie Pérez)
'You Never Talk Sweet' (written by Janis Oliver and Don Schlitz)
'Gone Again' (written by Janis Oliver and Gail Davies)
'Until I Stop Dancing' (written by Troy Seals, Steve Buckingham and Howard Shore)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sweethearts of The Rodeo's second album, 'One Time, One Night' (Columbia Records, 1988), included the following:

Sweethearts of The Rodeo
Kristine Arnold (vocals) & Janis Oliver (vocals, guitar)

Musicians
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Barry Beckett
Richard Bennett
Steve Buckingham
Dennis Burnside
Larry Byrom
Rodney Crowell and Vince Gill (background vocals)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (acoustic guitar)
David Hungate
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Randy McCormick
Augie Meyers
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Farrell Morris (percussion)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Tom Robb
Ricky Skaggs
Harry Stinson
Billy Joe Walker Junior (electric guitar)
Pete Wasner

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's second album, 'One Time, One Night' (Columbia Records, 1988), reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.

On Tuesday 20 September 1988, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Loving Proof' (Columbia Records, 1988), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'll Leave This World Loving You', which was written by Wayne Kemp () (No.1 for two weeks in November / December 1988)
'From a Jack to a King', which was written by Ned Miller () (No.1 for one week in March 1989)
'Hole in My Pocket', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003) (No.3, 1989)
'Living Proof', which was written by Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013) and Steve Clark (No.1 for one week in October 1989)

Ricky Van Shelton's second album, 'Loving Proof' (Columbia Records, 1988), also included the following tracks:

'Swimming Upstream' (written by Bucky Jones and Gary Nicholson)
'Let Me Live With Love (& Die With You)' (written by Skip Ewing and Red Lane)
'The Picture' (written by Ricky Van Shelton, Troy Seals and Steve Buckingham)
'Somebody's Back in Town', which was written by Doyle Wilburn (Monday 7 July 1930 - Saturday 16 October 1982), Teddy Wilburn (Monday 30 November 1931 - Monday 24 November 2003) and Don Helms (Monday 28 February 1927 - Monday 11 August 2008)
'Don't Send Me No Angels' (written by Wayne Kemp)
'He's Got You', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ricky Van Shelton's 'Loving Proof' (Columbia Records, 1988), included the following:

Steve Buckingham, Farrell Morris, John Wesley Ryles and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Dennis Burnside
Larry Byrom
Mark Casstevens (guitar)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson
Roy Huskey Jumior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Randy McCormick
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Loving Proof' (Columbia Records, 1988), reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988 and was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on Wednesday 20 December 1989.

Steve Buckingham, Dolly Parton & Ricky Skaggs at Treasure Isle Studios in Nashville during the first recording session for Ricky Skaggs' 'Kentucky Thunder' (Epic Records, 1989) in 1989

On Friday 26 May 1989, Ricky Skaggs saw the release of his 10th album, 'Kentucky Thunder' (Epic Records, 1989). Ricky decided to work with a co-producer and chose Steve Buckingham; 'Kentucky Thunder' (Epic Records, 1989) included five tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Lovin' Only Me' (written by Even Stevens and Hillary Kanter) (No.1 for one week in July 1989)
'Let It Be You' (written by Harry Stinson and Kevin Welch) (No.5, 1989)
'Heartbreak Hurricane' (written by Larry Cordle and Jim Rushing) (No.13, 1989)
'Hummingbird' (written by Tim DuBois and Greg Jennings) (No.20, 1990)
'He Was on to Somethin' (So He Made You)' (written by Sonny Curtis) (No.25, 1990)

Ricky Skaggs' 'Kentucky Thunder' (Epic Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'The Fields of Home' (written by Larry Cordle and Larry Shell)
'Lonesome For You' (written by Larry Cordle and Larry Shell)
'Kentucky Thunder' (written by written by Larry Cordle and Jim Rushing)
'When I Love' (written by Paul Overstreet and Don Schlitz)
'Casting My Shadow in The Road' (written by Jim Rushing and Randy Scruggs)
'Saviour, Save Me From Myself' (written by written by Larry Cordle and Jim Rushing)

Ricky Skaggs' 'Kentucky Thunder' (Epic Records, 1989) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

On Thursday 20 July 1989, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Ricky Van Shelton Sings Christmas' (Columbia Records, 1989), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included the following tracks:

'I'll Be Home For Christmas', which was written by Kim Gannon, Walter Kent (Wednesday 29 November 1911 - Wednesday 2 March 1994) and Buck Ram (Thursday 21 November 1907 - Tuesday 1 January 1991)
'White Christmas', which was written by Irving Berlin (11 May 1888 - Friday 22 September 1989)
'Santa Claus Is Coming To Town', which was written by John Frederick Coots (2 May 1897 - Monday 8 April 1985) and James 'Haven' Lamont Gillespie (6 February 1888 - Friday 14 March 1975)
'Silver Bells', which was written by Raymond Bernard Evans (Thursday 4 February 1915 - Thursday 15 February 2007) and Jay Livingston (Sunday 28 March 1915 - Wednesday 17 October 2001)
'Silent Night', which was written by Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 - 7 June 1863) and Joseph Mohr (11 December 1792 - 4 December 1848)
'C-H-R-I-S-T-M-A-S', which was written by Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008) and Jenny Lou Carson (Wednesday 13 January 1915 - Saturday 16 December 1978)
'Please Come Home For Christmas' (written by Charles Brown and Gene Redd)
'Pretty Paper' (written by Willie Nelson)
'Country Christmas' (written by Don Schlitz and Ricky Van Shelton)
'Christmas Long Ago' (written by Don Schlitz and Ricky Van Shelton)
'What Child Is This? (Greensleeves)', which was written by William Chatterton Dix (14 June 1837 - 9 September 1898)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ricky Van Shelton's 'Ricky Van Shelton Sings Christmas' (Columbia Records, 1989) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
George Binkley III, Conni Ellisor, Carl Gorodetzky, Ted Madsen, Dennis Molchan, Pamela Sixfin, Gary Vanosdale and Kristin Wilkinson (violin)
Mark Casstevens (guitar)
Roy Christensen (cello)
Al DeLory, Randy McCormick (piano)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (guitar, mandolin)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) and Craig Nelson (upright bass)
Louis Dean Nunley (The Jordanaires) (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), John Wesley Ryles, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
5th Avenue (additional background vocals)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle, mandolin)
Tom Robb (bass guitar)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Ricky Van Shelton Sings Christmas' (Columbia Records, 1989) reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

On Tuesday 16 January 1990, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Ricky Van Shelton III' (Columbia Records, 1990), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Statue of a Fool', which was written by Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 - Thursday 1 November 2012) (No.2, 1989)
'I've Cried My Last Tear For You' (written by Tony King and Chris Waters) (No.1 for one week in 1990)
'I Meant Every Word He Said', which was written by Joe Chambers, Bucky Jones and Curly Putman () (No.2, 1990)
'Life's Little Ups & Downs', which was written by Margaret Ann Rich () (No.4, 1990)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Ricky Van Shelton III' (Columbia Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

'You Would Do The Same For Me' (written by Rory Bourke and Mike Reid)
'I'm Starting Over' (written by Kix Brooks, John Wesley Ryles and Mark Sherrill)
'Love Is Burnin' (written by Donny Kees and Frank J. Myers)
'Not That I Care', which was written by Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'Oh, Pretty Woman', which was written by William Dees and Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988)
'I Still Love You' (written by Ricky Van Shelton)
'Sweet Memories', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002) / this track was a duet with Brenda Lee

Personnel involved in the recording of Ricky Van Shelton's 'Ricky Van Shelton III' (Columbia Records, 1990) included the following:

Eddie Bayers and Tommy Wells (drums)
Barry Beckett and Randy McCormick (piano)
Larry Byrom and Mark Casstevens (guitar)
Paul Franklin and Tommy Hannum (steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (guitar, mandolin)
David Hungate (bass guitar on the track 'Sweet Memories')
Roy Huskey Jumior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Farrell Morris (vibes)
Louis Dean Nunley (The Jordanaires) (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), John Wesley Ryles, Lisa Silver, Bergen White and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Tom Robb (bass guitar)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Ricky Van Shelton III' (Columbia Records, 1990) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990 and was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on Monday 8 April 1991.

In 1990, Sweethearts of The Rodeo (Janis Arnold & Kristine Arnold) saw the release of 'Buffalo Zone' (Columbia Records, 1990), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included five tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'This Heart' (written by Tony Haselden and Tim Menzies) (No.25, 1989)
'Cómo Se Dice (I Love You)' (written by Janis Arnold and Matraca Berg) / this track did not chart
'I Don't Want You To Know' (written by Janis Arnold and Don Schlitz) / this track did not chart
'What It Does To Me' (written by Janis Arnold) / this track did not chart
'You Look At Love That Way' (written by Skip Ewing and Don Sampson) / this track did not chart

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's 'Buffalo Zone' (Columbia Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

'Uphill All The Way' (written by Janis Arnold and Don Schlitz)
'He Doesn't Tell Me Anything' (written by Tommy Rocco, Charlie Black and Austin Roberts)
'Hard Road To Go' (written by Janis Arnold, Steve Buckingham and Don Schlitz)
'Blue Sky' (written by by Janis Arnold and Wendy Waldman)
'Don't Wake Me Up' (written by Don Schlitz and Paul Overstreet)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sweethearts of The Rodeo's 'Buffalo Zone' (Columbia Records, 1990), included the following:

Victor Battista (upright bass)
Eddie Bayers (drums)
Steve Buckingham, Mark Casstevens, Albert Lee and Tim Menzies (guitar)
Dennis Davis (artwork, design and illustration)
Paul Franklin (Dobro, pedal steel, steel guitar)
Steve Gibson (guitar, mandolin)
Janis Arnold (guitar, associate producer)
Roy Huskey Jumior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Bill Johnson (artwork and art direction)
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Farrell Morris (vibraphone)
Phil Naish (keyboards)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Tom Robb (bass)
Pete Wasner (keyboards)
Ricky Skaggs, Harry Stinson and Curtis Young (background vocals)

 

The cover of Sweethearts of The Rodeo's 'Buffalo Zone' (Columbia Records, 1990) was an obvious homage to The Byrds' 1968 album 'Sweetheart of The Rodeo' (Columbia Records, 1968), from which the duo derived their name.

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's 'Buffalo Zone' (Columbia Records, 1990), reached No.41 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990.

Steve Buckingham’s professional relationship with Dolly Parton dates back to 1990.

Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991) was her 30th solo studio album and was released on Saturday 6 April 1991; the album featured collaborations with Lorrie Morgan and Ricky Van Shelton, with additional supporting vocals provided by Vince Gill and Emmylou Harris.

Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991) was produced by Steve Buckingham and Gary Smith, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Rockin' Years' (written by Floyd Parton) (No.1 for one week in 1991) / this track was a duet with Ricky Van Shelton
'Silver & Gold', which was written by Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998), Gregg Perkins and Stan Perkins (No.15, 1991)
'Eagle When She Flies' (written by Dolly Parton) (No.33, 1991)
'Country Road' (written by Dolly Parton and Gary Scruggs) (No.46, 1992)

Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'If You Need Me' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Best Woman Wins' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track was a duet with Lorrie Morgan
'What A Heartache' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Runaway Feelin' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Dreams Do Come True' (written by Bill Owens)
'Family', which was written by Dolly Parton and Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998)
'Wildest Dreams' (written by Dolly Parton and Mac Davis)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991) included the following:

Sam Bacco (percussion)
Lea Jane Berinati, Richard Dennison, Joy Gardner, Vicki Hampton, The Kid Connection, Louis Dean Nunley (The Jordanaires) (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Jennifer O'Brien, John Wesley Ryles, Lisa Silver, Howard Smith, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (backing vocals)
Joe Bogan (engineer)
Steve Buckingham (producer)
Ray Bunch (string arrangements)
'Romantic' Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Robert Charles, Chrissy Follmar, Larry Jeffries, Brad Jones, John David Parker (assistant engineer)
Paddy Corcoran (uilleann pipes)
Michael Davis (organ)
Glen Duncan and Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (Dobro, steel pan)
Steve Gibson (guitar, mandolin)
Vince Gill, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Patty Loveless and Harry Stinson (vocal harmony)
Carlos Grier (digital editing)
Carl Jackson (acoustic guitar, vocal harmony)
Bill Johnson (art direction)
John Kunz (assistant engineer, mixing assistant)
Jimmy Mattingly (fiddle, mandolin)
Jodi Lynn Miller (design assistant)
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Gary Paczosa (engineer, mixing)
Dolly Parton (vocals, executive producer)
Denny Purcell (mastering)
Randee Saint Nicholas (photography)
Gary W. Smith (piano, keyboards, producer)
Steve Turner (drums)
Paul Uhrig (bass)
Alisa Jones Wall (dulcimer)
Bruce Watkins (acoustic guitar)
Kent Wells (electric guitar)

Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991 and was Dolly Parton's first solo album to do so in a decade; the album also reached No.24 on the Billboard pop music albums chart.

Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991) sold 74,000 copies in its first week of release and ended up being certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

On Tuesday 21 May 1991, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Backroads' (Columbia Records, 1991), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Rockin' Years' (written by Floyd Parton) (No.1 for one week in 1991) / this track was a duet with Dolly Parton and was also included on Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991)
'I Am a Simple Man' (written by Walt Aldridge) (No.1 for one week in 1991)
'Keep It Between The Lines' (written by Russell Smith and Kathy Louvin) (No.1 for one week in 1991)
'After The Lights Go Out' (written by Warner McPherson) (No.13, 1991)
'Backroads' (written by Charlie Major) (No.2, 1992)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Backroads' (Columbia Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'Oh, Heart of Mine' (written by Allen Shamblin and Bernie Nelson)
'Some Things Are Better Left Alone' (written by Roger Murrah and Larry Shell)
'Call Me Up' (written by Josh Leo and Harry Stinson)
'If You're Ever In My Arms' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Who'll Turn Out The Lights', which was written by Wayne Kemp and Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Backroads' (Columbia Records, 1991) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991 and was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on Friday 6 December 1991.

On Tuesday 28 April 1992, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Don't Overlook Salvation' (Columbia Records, 1992), an album of gospel music, which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and from which no singles were released. Despite its lack of singles, the album was certified 'Gold' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

On the inside of the cover is a painting by Ricky Van Shelton of Jesus Christ rescuing a lamb.

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Don't Overlook Salvation' (Columbia Records, 1992) included the following tracks:

'Don't Overlook Salvation' (written by John Bava)
'To My Mansion In The Sky' (written by Jimmie Davis)
'Family Bible' (written by Walt Breeland, Paul Buskirk and Claude Gray)
'Holy (I Bowed On My Knees And Cried Holy)' (written by Jimmie Davis)
'Suppertime' (written by Ira Stanphill)
'I Shall Not Be Moved' (arranged by Ricky Van Shelton)
'Mansion Over The Hilltop' (written by Stanphill)
'The Old Rugged Cross' (traditional)
'I Would Take Nothing For My Journey Now' (written by Jimmie Davis and Charles Goodman)
'I Saw A Man' (written by Arthur 'Guitar Boogie' Smith)
'Just As I Am/He Smiled As He Ran Out To Play' (arranged by Ricky Van Shelton)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ricky Van Shelton's 'Don't Overlook Salvation' (Columbia Records, 1992) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (percussion)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar, banjo)
Steve Gibson (guitar, mandolin)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (upright bass)
Randy McCormick (piano, organ)
Farrell Morris (percussion)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle, mandolin)
Tom Robb (bass guitar)
The Cumberland Boys (background vocals)
Vicki Hampton and Donna McElroy (additional background vocals on 'The Old Rugged Cross')
Kristin Wilkinson (strings arrangements)
Grace Mihi Bahng (cello)
David Davidson and Christian Teal (violin)
Kristin Wilkinson (viola)

On Tuesday 11 August 1992, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Greatest Hits Plus' (Columbia Records, 1992), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included the hit singles from Ricky Van Shelton's first four studio albums, along with three new tracks:

'Just As I Am' (written by Larry Boone and Paul Nelson) / this track was previously unreleased / when released as a single, it reached No.23 in 1993
'Wild Man' (written by Rick Giles and Susan Longacre) / this track was previously unreleased / when released as a single, it reached No.5 in 1993
'Somebody Lied' (written by Joe Chambers and Larry Jenkins) (No.1 for one week in December 1987)
'I've Cried My Last Tear For You' (written by Tony King and Chris Waters) (No.1, 1990)
'I'll Leave This World Loving You' (written by Wayne Kemp) (No.1 for two weeks in November/December 1988)
'Statue Of A Fool', which was written by Jan Crutchfield (Saturday 26 February 1938 - Thursday 1 November 2012) (No.2, 1989)
'I Am a Simple Man' (written by Walt Aldridge) (No.1, 1991)
'Life Turned Her That Way', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002) (No.1 for one week in March 1988)
'Keep It Between The Lines' (written by Russell Smith and Kathy Louvin) (No.1, 1991)
'Rockin' Years' (written by Floyd Parton) (No.1, 1991) / this track was a duet with Dolly Parton and was also included on Dolly Parton's 'Eagle When She Flies' (Columbia Records, 1991)
'From a Jack to a King', which was written by Ned Miller () (No.1 for one week in March 1989)
'Living Proof', which was written by Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013) and Steve Clark (No.1 for one week in October 1989)
'Don't We All Have The Right', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992) (No.1 for one week in July / August 1988)
'Wear My Ring Around Your Neck' (written by Bert Carroll and Moody Russell) / this track was also included on the 'Honeymoon in Vegas' movie soundtrack / when released as a single, it reached No.26 in 1992

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Greatest Hits Plus' (Columbia Records, 1992) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992.

In 1992, Sweethearts of The Rodeo (Janis Arnold & Kristine Arnold) saw the release of 'Sisters' (Columbia Records, 1992), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and Wendy Waldman, and included two tracks, which were minor hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Hard-Headed Man' (written by Andy Landis and Don Schlitz) (No.63, 1991)
'Devil & Your Deep Blue Eyes' (written by Russell Smith and Lee Roy Parnell) (No.74, 1991)

Sweethearts of The Rodeo's 'Sisters' (Columbia Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

'Why Should I Stay Blue' (written by Mike Reid and Rory Bourke)
'I Don't Stay Down For Long' (written by Janis Arnold and Wendy Waldman)
'Man Of My Dreams' (written by Janis Arnold)
'A Woman Can Tell (Every Time)' (written by Janis Arnold and Andy Landis)
'Have I Done Enough' (written by Janis Arnold, Wendy Waldman and Rick Vincent)
'(Our Love Is Like) Silver And Gold' (written by Janis Arnold and Wendy Waldman)
'Be Good To Me' (written by Janis Arnold, Wendy Waldman and Rick Vincent)
'Watch Me Run' (written by Janis Arnold and Andy Landis)
'Sisters (Best Of Friends)' (written by Janis Arnold, Wendy Waldman and Kristine Arnold)

On Tuesday 23 February 1993, Dolly Parton's 'Slow Dancing With The Moon' (Columbia Records, 1993), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and Dolly Parton, featured a number of famous guest artists, including Collin Raye, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Kathy Mattea, Tanya Tucker, Maura O'Connell, Billy Dean, Pam Tillis, Marty Stuart and Billy Ray Cyrus.

Dolly Parton's 'Slow Dancing With The Moon' (Columbia Records, 1993) was her 31st studio album, and included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Romeo' (written by Dolly Parton) (No.27, 1993) / this track featured guest vocals from Mary Chapin Carpenter, Pam Tillis, Billy Ray Cyrus, Kathy Mattea and Tanya Tucker
'More Where That Came From' (written by Dolly Parton) (No.58, 1993)
'Full Circle' (written by Dolly Parton and Mac Davis) / this track was released as a single in 1993, but it did not chart

Dolly Parton's 'Slow Dancing With The Moon' also included the following tracks:

'(You Got Me Over) A Heartache Tonight' (written by Dolly Parton and Larry Weiss) / this track was a duet with Billy Dean
'What Will Baby Be' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Put a Little Love in Your Heart' (written by Jackie DeShannon, Jimmy Holliday and Randy Myers)
'Why Can't We?' (written by Chuck Cannon, Austin Cunningham and Allen Shamblin)
'I'll Make Your Bed' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Whenever Forever Comes' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track was a duet with Collin Raye
'Cross My Heart', which was written by Rachel Dennison, Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) and Randy Parton
'Slow Dancing With The Moon' (written by Mac Davis)
'High & Mighty' (written by Dolly Parton)

Despite the lackluster chart performance of the singles ('Romeo', 'More Where That Came From' and 'Full Circle'), Dolly Parton's 'Slow Dancing With The Moon' (Columbia Records, 1993) itself was well-received critically, and reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, and No.16 on the Billboard pop music albums chart.

Dolly Parton's 'Slow Dancing With The Moon' (Columbia Records, 1993) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993 and was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

In 1993, Sweethearts of The Rodeo (Janis Arnold & Kristine Arnold) saw the release of 'Rodeo Waltz' (Sugar Hill Records, 1993), which was their first album for Sugar Hill Records and was produced by Steve Buckingham; the album included the following tracks, none of which were released as singles:

'Get Rhythm', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Long Time Gone', which was written by Frank Harford and Tex Ritter (Thursday 12 January 1905 - Wednesday 2 January 1974)
'Things Will Grow' (written by Don Schlitz)
'Hoping That You're Hoping' (written by Betty Harrison)
'Jenny Dreamed of Trains', which was written by Vince Gill and Guy Clark ()
'Brand New Tennessee Waltz', which was written by Jesse Winchester (Wednesday 17 May 1944 - Friday 11 April 2014)
'Bluegrass Boy' (written by Janis Arnold and Don Schlitz)
'Please Help Me I'm Falling', which was written by Don Robertson () and Hal Blair ()
'Deep River Blues' (traditional / arranged by Janis Arnold)
'There One Morning' (written by Janis Arnold)
'Steel Rail Blues' (written by Gordon Lightfoot)
'Broken Arrow' (written by Robbie Robertson)

On Tuesday 24 August 1993, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'A Bridge I Didn't Burn' (Columbia Records, 1993), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and Ricky Van Shelton, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'A Couple of Good Years Left' (written by Gary Burr) (No.44, 1993)
'Where Was I' (written by Harry Stinson) (No.20, 1994)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'A Bridge I Didn't Burn' (Columbia Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

'If They Turn Off Our Lights' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'A Bridge I Didn't Burn', which was written by Tracy Byrd, Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) and Billy Yates
'My First Reaction' (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
'I Know The Way By Broken Heart' (written by Ronnie Samoset and Craig Wiseman)
'Talking To God' (written by Lewis Anderson and Layng Martine Junior)
'Heartache As Big As Texas' (written by David Lewis and Royce Porter)
'If It Weren't For Me' (written by Roger Brown and David Stephenson)
'Linda Lu' (written by Ray Sharpe)
'Roses After The Rain' (written by Billy Burnette and Brian Tabor)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ricky Van Shelton's 'A Bridge I Didn't Burn' (Columbia Records, 1993) included the following:

Tommy Wells and Eddie Bayers (drums)
Tom Robb (bass)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (double bass)
Steve Gibson (guitar, mandolin)
Brent Mason (guitar)
Bill Lloyd and Gary Nicholson (electric guitar)
Don Potter and Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Barry Beckett and Randy McCormick (piano)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, Pedabro)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos and Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Jerry Douglas (dobro)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
John Wesley Ryles, Dennis Wilson, Gary Burr, Harry Stinson and Billy Yates (background vocals)

Ricky Van Shelton's 'A Bridge I Didn't Burn' (Columbia Records, 1993) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994.

On Tuesday 2 November 1993, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) saw the release of 'Honky Tonk Angels' (Columbia Records / TriStar, 1993), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, Dolly Parton and Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 - Wednesday 7 January 1998), and included the following tracks:

'It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels', which was written by Joseph Denton 'Jay' Miller (Friday 5 May 1922 - Saturday 23 March 1996) / this track featured a guest vocal appearance by the song's originator Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012)
'Put It Off Until Tomorrow' (written by Dolly Parton and Bill Owens)
'Silver Threads And Golden Needles', which was written by Jack Rhodes (1907 - 1968) and Dick Reynolds
'Please Help Me I'm Falling (in Love With You)', which was written by Don Robertson () and Hal Blair ()
'Sittin' On The Front Porch Swing' (written by Buddy Sheffield)
'Wings of a Dove', which was written by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001)
'I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know' (written by Cecil Null)
'Wouldn't It Be Great' (written by Loretta Lynn)
'That's The Way It Could Have Been', which was written by Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
'Let Her Fly' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Lovesick Blues', which was written by Cliff Friend (1 October 1893 - Thursday 27 June 1974) and Irving Mills (16 January 1894 - Sunday 21 April 1985) / this track featured a guest vocal from Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 - Tuesday 5 March 1963)
'I Dreamed of a Hillbilly Heaven', which was written by Eddie Dean and Hal Southern / this is Tex Ritter's 1962 classic, which features new spoken dialogue

Personnel involved in the recording of Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette's 'Honky Tonk Angels' (Columbia Records / TriStar, 1993), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, Dolly Parton and Owen Bradley (Thursday 21 October 1915 - Wednesday 7 January 1998) and included the following:

Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) (lead vocals, backing vocals, harmony vocals)
Patsy Cline (Thursday 8 September 1932 - Tuesday 5 March 1963) and Kitty Wells (Saturday 30 August 1919 - Monday 16 July 2012) (guest vocals)
Eddie Bayers and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Farrell Moris (percussion)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997), Bob Moore and Tom Robb (bass)
Floyd Cramer (Friday 27 October 1933 - Wednesday 31 December 1997) and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Hank Garland (Tuesday 11 November 1930 - Monday 27 December 2004), Steve Gibson, Grady Martin, Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014), Billy Sanford and Bruce Watkins (guitars)
Jimmy Day (Tuesday 9 January 1934 - Friday 22 January 1999) and Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (pedal steel)
Adam Steffey (mandolin)
Harold Bradley, Hank Garland (Tuesday 11 November 1930 - Monday 27 December 2004) and Steve Gibson (tic-tac)
Cindy Reynolds Wyatt (harp)
Richard Dennison and Louis Dean Nunley (The Jordanaires) (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012)

Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette's 'Honky Tonk Angels' (Columbia Records / TriStar, 1993) had been a long-rumoured album project between the country singers for over a decade and received much publicity and acclaim upon its release, although its only single release, 'Silver Threads And Golden Needles', which was written by Jack Rhodes (1907 - 1968) and Dick Reynolds), barely dented the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart.

The song's accompanying video, however, received heavy rotation from Country Music Television (CMT) and The Nashville Network (TNN).

Record sales, however, placed Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton & Tammy Wynette's 'Honky Tonk Angels' (Columbia Records / TriStar, 1993) at No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993, and at No.42 on the Billboard Top 200 pop music album chart in 1993; the album was certified 'Gold' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in 1993.

On Tuesday 27 September 1994, Dolly Parton saw the release of 'Heartsongs: Live From Home' (Columbia Records / Blue Eye Records, 1994), a 'live' album recorded at a concert at Dolly Parton's theme park 'Dollywood', which featured a mix of Dolly Parton originals and traditional folk songs.

Dolly Parton's 'Heartsongs: Live From Home' (Columbia Records / Blue Eye Records, 1994) included the following tracks:

'Heartsong' (written by Dolly Parton)
'I'm Thinking Tonight of My Blue Eyes, which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960)
'Mary of The Wild Moor' (written by Joseph W. Turner)
'In The Pines' (traditional)
'My Blue Tears' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Applejack' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Coat of Many Colors' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Smoky Mountain Memories' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Night Train to Memphis', which was written by Owen Bradley (), Marvin Huges and Beasley Smith
'What a Friend We Have in Jesus' (written by Charles Converse and Joseph Scriven)
'Hold Fast to The Right' (written by James D. Vaughan)
'Walter Henry Hagan' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Barbara Allen' (traditional) / this track featured guest vocals in Irish from Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh
'Brave Little Soldier' (written by Dolly Parton)
'To Daddy' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track was previously unreleased
'True Blue' (written by Dolly Parton and James Newton Howard)
'Longer Than Always' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Wayfaring Stranger' (traditional)
'My Tennessee Mountain Home' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Heartsong' (reprise) (written by Dolly Parton)
'Cas Walker Theme'
'Black Draught Theme'
'PMS Blues' (written by Dolly Parton)

Personnel involved in the recording of Dolly Parton's 'Heartsongs: Live From Home' (Columbia Records / Blue Eye Records, 1994) included the following:

Altan (vocals)
Mairead Nimahonaigh (vocals, fiddle)
Frankie Kennedy (flute)
Ciaran Curran (bouzouki)
Daithi Gproule, Randy Scruggs, Bruce Watkins and Steve Buckingham (guitar)
Ciaran Tourish and Jimmy Matthingly (fiddle)
Dermot Bryne (accordian)
Jerry O'Sullivan (uilleann pipes)
Timothy White (photography)
Alison Krauss (harmony vocals, fiddle)
Suzanne Cox (harmony vocals)
Rhonda Vincent and Darrin Vincent (harmony vocals)
Carl Jackson (harmony vocals, guitar)
Harry Stinson (drums)
Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) and Viktor Krauss (upright bass)
David Lindley (bronson acoustic steel, Hawaiian acoustic steel, dulcimer, autoharp, claw hammer banjo)
Adam Steffey and Ronny McCoury (mandolin)
Ron Block and Robbie Mercury (banjo)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Jerry Douglas (dobro)
Richard Dennison, Jennifer O'Brien-Enoch, Lisa Silver and Louis Dean Nunley (The Jordanaires) (background vocals)

Dolly Parton's 'Heartsongs: Live From Home' (Columbia Records / Blue Eye Records, 1994) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994.

On Tuesday 24 September 1996, Dolly Parton saw the release of 'Treasures' (Rising Tide Records / Blue Eye Records, 1996), which was produced by Steve Buckingham and included the following tracks:

'Peace Train' (written by Cat Stevens)
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)
'Just When I Needed You Most', which was written by Randy VanWarmer (Wednesday 30 March 1955 - Monday 12 January 2004) and Tony Wilson
'Something’s Burning' (written by Mac Davis)
'Before The Next Teardrop Falls', which was written by Ben Peters (Tuesday 20 June 1933 - Wednesday 25 May 2005) and Venna Keith
'After The Gold Rush' (written by Neil Young)
'Walking On Sunshine' (written by Kimberley Rew)
'Behind Closed Doors' (written by Kenny O'Dell)
'Don't Let Me Cross Over' (written by Penny Jay)
'Satin Sheets' (written by John Volinkaty)
'For The Good Times' (written Kris Kristofferson)

Steve Buckingham played Baryton guitar, 12-string electric guitar, 12-string guitar, acoustic guitar, baritone guitar and mandolin on Dolly Parton's 'Treasures' (Rising Tide Records / Blue Eye Records, 1996).

Dolly Parton's 'Treasures' (Rising Tide Records / Blue Eye Records, 1996) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1996.

On Tuesday 27 October 1998, Ricky Van Shelton saw the release of 'Making Plans' (Vanguard Records, 1998), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and was released exclusively through Wal Mart, so it was unable to chart and no singles were released.

Ricky Van Shelton's 'Making Plans' (Columbia Records, 1998), which was his only release under the Vanguard Records label, included the following tracks:

'Just Say Goodbye' (written by Joe Chambers and Byron Hill)
'When The Feeling Goes Away', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'She Needs Me' (written by Chuck Cannon and Jimmy Stewart)
'Borrowed Angel', which was written by Mel Street (Saturday 21 October 1933 - Saturday 21 October 1978)
'I Wish You Were More Like Your Memory' (written by Joe Chambers)
'Tic Toc' (written by Brett Beavers and Troy Johnson)
'It Wouldn't Kill Me' (written by Larry Boone, Paul Nelson and Tom Shapiro)
'Making Plans', which was written by Voni Morrison and Johnny Russell (Tuesday 23 January 1940 - Tuesday 3 July 2001)
'He's Not The Man I Used To Be' (written by Gary Duffey and Micki Foster)
'Our Love' (written by Deana Cox, Mike Geiger and Woody Mullis)
'The Best Thing Goin' (written by Mike Geiger, Michael Huffman and Woody Mullis)
'The Best Is Yet To Come', which was written by Colleen Peterson (Tuesday 14 November 1950 - Wednesday 9 October 1996), Cyril Lawson and Nancy Simmonds

On Monday 4 October 1999, Dolly Parton saw the release of 'The Grass is Blue' (Sugar Hill Records, 1999), a bluegrass album, which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included the following tracks:

'Travelin' Prayer' (written by Billy Joel)
'Cash On The Barrelhead', which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965)
'A Few Old Memories', which was written by Hazel Dickens ()
'I'm Gonna Sleep With One Eye Open', which was written by Lester Flatt (Friday 19 June 1914 - Friday 11 May 1979)
'Steady As The Rain' (written by Dolly Parton)
'I Still Miss Someone', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) and Roy Cash Junior
'Endless Stream of Tears' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Silver Dagger' (traditional)
'Train, Train' (written by Shorty Medlocke)
'I Wonder Where You Are Tonight' (written by Johnny Bond)
'Will He Be Waiting For Me' (written by Dolly Parton)
'The Grass is Blue' (written by Dolly Parton)
'I am Ready' (written by Rachel Parton Dennison)

In addition to rejuvenating Dolly Parton's then-lagging career, 'The Grass is Blue' (Sugar Hill Records, 1999), along with the 'O Brother, Where Art Thou' soundtrack and the work of Alison Krauss, was credited with making bluegrass music a hugely popular musical genre during the early 2000s.

Although Dolly Parton's 'The Grass is Blue' (Sugar Hill Records, 1999) received little airplay on mainstream country radio in the United States, it sold well, peaking at No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999 and was among the most critically acclaimed albums of Dolly Parton's career.

Dolly Parton's 'The Grass is Blue' (Sugar Hill Records, 1999) was listed on many critics' year-end 'best of' lists and won a Grammy Award for 'Best Bluegrass Album' in 2001.

On Tuesday 16 January 2001, Dolly Parton saw the release of 'Little Sparrow' (Sugar Hill Records, 2001), which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and was the second in Dolly Parton's trilogy of folk / bluegrass albums, which were released between 1999 and 2002.

Dolly Parton's 'Little Sparrow' (Sugar Hill Records, 2001) included the following tracks:

'Little Sparrow' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Shine' (written by Ed Roland) / this track featured guest vocals from Nickel Creek
'I Don't Believe You've Met My Baby' (written by Autry Inman)
'My Blue Tears' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Seven Bridges Road', which was written by Steve Young ()
'Bluer Pastures' (written by Dolly Parton)
'A Tender Lie' (written by Randy Sharp)
'I Get a Kick Out of You', which was written by Cole Porter (9 June 1891 - Thursday 15 October 1964)
'Mountain Angel' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Marry Me' (written by Dolly Parton)
'Down From Dover' (written by Dolly Parton)
'The Beautiful Lie' (written by David 'Butch' McDade)
'In The Sweet By & By' (written by Sanford Bennett and Joseph Webster)
'Little Sparrow (reprise)' (written by Dolly Parton)

Among the backing musicians were members of the alternative bluegrass band Nickel Creek, Alison Krauss, and members of Irish Traditional band Altan, whose singer, Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh sung Irish Gaelic vocals on the album.

Dolly Parton's recording of 'Shine' (written by Ed Roland) won a Grammy Award for 'Best Female Country Vocal Performance.

The track 'Marry Me' (written by Dolly Parton) was later featured on the soundtrack of the Reese Witherspoon film 'Sweet Home Alabama'.

While 'The Grass is Blue' (Sugar Hill Records, 1999), the predecessor to 'Little Sparrow' (Sugar Hill Records, 2001), featured straightforward bluegrass, Dolly Parton's 'Little Sparrow' (Sugar Hill Records, 2001), which was released in early 2001, featured a blend of Appalachian folk, bluegrass and country gospel styles. Each of the musical styles was a notable part of the culture from Dolly Parton's East Tennessee upbringing.

Dolly Parton's 'Little Sparrow' (Sugar Hill Records, 2001) received positive reviews and reached No.12 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2001, Dolly Parton's highest charting solo album in nearly a decade. The album was dedicated to the memory of Dolly's father, Lee Parton.

In 2003, Steve Buckingham signed Mindy Smith to a recording contract with Vanguard Records. On Tuesday 27 January 2004, Mindy Smith saw the release of her debut album, 'One Moment More' (Vanguard Records, 2004), which included three tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Jolene' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Dolly Parton, was released as a single in 2003, but it did not chart
'Come to Jesus' (written by Mindy Smith) (No.32, 2004)
'One Moment More' (written by Mindy Smith) / this track was released as a single in 2004, but it did not chart

Mindy Smith's 'One Moment More' (Vanguard Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

'Falling' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Raggedy Ann' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Fighting For It All' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Train Song' (written by Mindy Smith)
'It's Amazing' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Angel Doves' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Down In Flames' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Hurricane' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Hard To Know' (written by Mindy Smith)

On Tuesday 14 October 2003, the Various Artists compilation album, 'Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton' (Sugar Hill Records, 2003), which included the following tracks:

'9 to 5' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Alison Krauss
'I Will Always Love You' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Melissa Etheridge
'The Grass is Blue' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Norah Jones
'Do I Ever Cross Your Mind' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Joan Osborne
'The Seeker' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Shelby Lynne
'Jolene' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Mindy Smith
'To Daddy' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Emmylou Harris
'Coat of Many Colours' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Shania Twain
'Little Sparrow' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Kasey Chambers
'Dagger Through The Heart' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Sinead O'Connor
'Light Of A Clear Blue Morning' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Allison Moorer
'Two Doors Down' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Me'Shell N'Degeocello
'Just Because I'm a Woman' (written by Dolly Parton) / this track featured Dolly Parton and was a re-recording of Dolly's single, which reached No.17 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1968

Personnel involved in the recording of the various artists compilation album, 'Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton' (Sugar Hill Records, 2003), included the following:

Me'Shell Ndegéocello (vocals, guitar, synthesizer, programming)
Jerry Douglas (guitar, resonator guitar)
Ron Block (guitar, National guitar)
Dan Tyminski (guitar, mandolin)
John Leventhal (guitar, organ, percussion)
Shelby Lynne (guitar, percussion, background vocals)
James Harrah, Steve Buckingham and Bryan Sutton (guitar)
Emmylou Harris, Kevin Breit and Rodney Crowell (acoustic guitar)
Adam Levy , Kenny Vaughn, Mark Punch and Joe McMahan (electric guitar)
Brian Ahern (12-string guitar, gut-string guitar)
Sonny Landreth (slide guitar)
R. McCormack (resonator guitar, banjo, mandolin)
Mike Compton and Lex Price (mandolin)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Alison Krauss (viola)
Mickey Raphael (harmonica)
Chris Mosher (piano, programming)
Norah Jones, Roy Bittan, David Morgan and Gary 'Bud' Smith (piano)
Glen D. Hardin (electric piano)
Barry Beckett (Wurlitzer organ)
David Cole (keyboards, drum programming)
Larry Antonino, Viktor Krauss and Barry Bales (upright bass)
Kerry Buchanan, Chris 'Daddy' Dave, Matt Laug, Owen Hale, Andrew Borger and Shannon Forrest (drums)
RIck DePofi and John Ware (percussion)
Cheryl White, Carmella Ramsey, Melinda Smith, Julia Waters, Allison Moorer, Maxi Anderson and Maxine Willard Waters (background vocals)

In July 2006, Linda Ronstadt & Ann Savoy saw the release of 'Adieu False Heart' (Vanguard Records, 2006), a Grammy Award nominated album, which was produced by Steve Buckingham, and included the following tracks:

'Opening'
'Adieu False Heart' (written by Arthur Smith)
'I Can't Get Over You' (written by Julie Miller)
'Marie Mouri' (written by David Greely)
'King of Bohemia' (written by Richard Thompson)
'Plus Tu Tournes' (written by Michel Hindenoch)
'Go Away From My Window' (written by John Jacob Niles)
'Burns' Supper' (written by Richard Thompson)
'The One I Love is Gone', which was written by Bill Monroe (Wednesday 13 September 1911 - Monday 9 September 1996)
'Interlude'
'Rattle My Cage' (written by Chas Justus)
'Parlez-Moi D'Amour' (written by J. Neuburger)
'Too Old to Die Young' (written by Scott Dooley, John Hadley and Kevin Welch)
'Interlude'
'Walk Away Renée' (written by Mike Brown, Bob Calilli and Tony Sansone)
'Closing'

Personnel involved in the recording of Linda Ronstadt & Ann Savoy's 'Adieu False Heart' (Vanguard Records, 2006) included the following:

Linda Ronstadt (lead vocals, harmony)
Ann Savoy (lead vocals, harmony, acoustic guitar)
Dirk Powell (fretless banjo)
Sam Broussard, Buddy Miller, Joel Savoy and Chas Justus (acoustic guitar)
Andrea Zonn (resophonic viola)
Stuart Duncan and Kevin Wimmer (fiddle)
David Schnaufer (bowed dulcimer)
Bryon House and Eric Frey (upright bass)
Tim Lauer (accordion)
Kristin Wilkinson (viola)
John Catchings (cello)
Christine Balfa (triangle)
Sam Bush (mandolin)
Gary Paczosa (engineer, mixing)

Linda Ronstadt and Ann Savoy sing together as The Zozo Sisters on 'Adieu False Heart' (Vanguard Records, 2006), which brings together a mixture of Louisiana Cajun sounds, early 20th century gems, along with folk/rock classics. The album incorporated Ann Savoy's rich alto and the pure soprano of Linda Ronstadt.

'Adieu False Heart' (Vanguard Records, 2006) received mixed critical reviews and even landed on several year-end Top Ten (favourite) lists, although it peaked at a disappointing No.146 on the Billboard AlbumS Chart.

'Adieu False Heart' (Vanguard Records, 2006) earned two Grammy Award nominations, including 'Best Traditional Folk Album' and 'Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical'.

In light of her 2011 retirement announcement, and the revelation of her affliction with Parkinson's disease in 2013, which has left her unable to sing, this album is likely to be Linda Ronstadt's final release of new music.

On Tuesday 10 October 2006, Mindy Smith saw the release of her second album, 'Long Island Shores' (Vanguard Records, 2006), which was produced by Mindy Smith, Lex Price, Steve Buckingham and which included two tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Out Loud' (written by Hillary Lindsey and Mindy Smith) / this track was released as a single in 2006, but it did not chart
'Please Stay' (written by Mindy Smith) / this track was released as a single in 2007, but it did not chart

Mindy Smith's second album, 'Long Island Shores' (Vanguard Records, 2006) also included the following tracks:

'Little Devil' (written by Angelo and Mindy Smith)
'Edge Of Love' (written by Beth Nielsen Chapman and Mindy Smith)
'Tennessee' (written by Mindy Smith)
'I'm Not The Only One Asking' (written by Mindy Smith and Fred Wilhelm)
'What If The World Stops Turning' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Mindy Smith) / this track featured guest vocals from Buddy Miller)
'You Just Forgot' (written by Dave Loggins, Dennis Robbins and John Scott Sherrill)
'You Know I Love You Baby' (written by Maia Sharp and Mindy Smith)
'Out Of Control' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Long Island' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Peace Of Mind' (written by Mindy Smith)

In 2007, Steve Buckingham's relationship with the legendary Levon Helm (Sunday 26 May 1940 - Thursday 19 April 2012), former drummer for The Band, and producer, Larry Campbell, brought the artist to Vanguard Records and resulted in the Grammy award-winning album, 'Dirt Farmer' (Vanguard Records, 2007); the album was released on Tuesday 30 October 2007 and was Levon Helm's first studio album since 1982.

Levon Helm's Grammy award-winning album, 'Dirt Farmer' (Vanguard Records, 2007), included the following tracks:

'False Hearted Lover Blues' (traditional)
'Poor Old Dirt Farmer' (written by Tracy Schwarz)
'The Mountain' (written by Steve Earle)
'Little Birds' (traditional)
'The Girl I Left Behind' (traditional)
'Calvary' (written by Byron Isaacs)
'Anna Lee' (written by Laurelyn Dossett)
'Got Me A Woman' (written by Paul Kennerley)
'A Train Robbery' (written by Paul Kennerley)
'Single Girl, Married Girl', which was written by Alvin Pleasant (A.P.) Delaney Carter (15 December 1891 - Monday 7 November 1960)
'The Blind Child' (traditional)
'Feelin' Good', which was written by J.B. Lenoir (Tuesday 5 March 1929 - Saturday 29 April 1967)
'Wide River To Cross' (written by Buddy Miller and Julie Miller)

Personnel involved in the recording of Levon Helm's Grammy award-winning album, 'Dirt Farmer' (Vanguard Records, 2007), included the following:

Larry Campbell (dulcimer, acoustic guitar, fiddle, mandolin, percussion, arranger, background vocals, producer, guitar)
Amy Helm (mandolin, percussion, piano, arranger, drums, vocals, background vocals, producer, harmony vocals, mandola)
Levon Helm (Sunday 26 May 1940 - Thursday 19 April 2012) (acoustic guitar, mandolin, arranger, drums, vocals, liner notes)
Byron Isaacs (bass, percussion, background vocals)
Buddy Miller and Julie Miller (harmony vocals)
Brian John Mitchell (piano, accordion, background vocals)
Glenn Patscha (pump organ)
George Receli (percussion)
Teresa Williams (background vocals, harmony vocals)

For ten years, Steve Buckingham was the Vice-President of A&R and staff producer for Columbia Records.

Steve Buckingham also served for eleven years as Senior Vice President of A&R and producer for Vanguard Records and Sugar Hill Records.

In addition, Steve Buckingham is a musical historian. He created the college course: 'How Rhythm & Blues and Rock 'n' Roll Tore Down The Walls of Segregation'. Steve has taught this course at The University of Richmond in Virginia and is currently teaching at Vanderbilt University's Blair School of Music.

Connect with Steve Buckingham at stevebuckinghammusic.com

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