• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.

Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted during 2014, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Melissa Luman Phillips, which she submitted to this site on Sunday 23 February 2014.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Melissa Luman Phillips who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Melissa Luman Phillips
This quote was submitted on Sunday 23 February 2014.

'When Gene Watson's voice comes on the radio, I listen and sing every word.

His songs are just great classic country songs.

And Gene should be a member of The Grand Ole Opry'.

Thank you, Melissa Luman Phillips, for your support of Gene Watson.



About Melissa Luman Phillips...



Melissa Luman Phillips was born Melissa Claire Luman in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee on Friday 17 June 1966.

Melissa Luman Phillips participates in shows with the other 'Second Generation Kids'.



Melissa Claire Luman Phillips is the only daughter of Bob Luman (Thursday 15 April 1937 - Wednesday 27 December 1978) and Barbara Nancy Tisman (Sunday 4 August 1940 - Thursday 2 August 2007).

Bob Luman - An Appreciation

Bob Luman was born Robert Glynn (Bob) Luman in Nacogdoches, Texas on Thursday 15 April 1937, the son of Joseph Clifton Luman (1915 - 1988) and Lavine Blankenship Luman (1917 - 1990).

Bob Luman was introduced to music by his father, who played fiddle, guitar and harmonica in local amateur bands.

Bob received his first guitar at the age of thirteen. While he was in high school in Kilgore, where the family had moved, Bob formed his own band. Bob Luman was also a baseball star at Kilgore High School.

In 1955, Bob Luman saw the South's newest singing sensation, Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977), an encounter that helped him determine his career interest. After failing a trial in professional baseball with The Pittsburgh Pirates, Bob dedicated himself full-time to music.

In 1956, Bob Luman won a talent contest held by the Future Farmers of America. This earned him a spot as a regular on The Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport. At the show, Bob Luman formed The Shadows, a band which consisted of James Burton on guitar, James Kirkland on bass and Butch White on drums.

In 1957, Bob Luman signed with Imperial Records and recorded 'All Night Long' and 'Amarillo Blues'. It was also in 1957 that Bob Luman was televised on 'Town Hall Party' in Los Angeles and appeared in the movie 'Carnival Rock', backing the film's featured artist, David Houston (Monday 9 December 1935 - Tuesday 30 November 1993).

In 1958, after being released by Imperial Recoords, Bob Luman signed with Capitol Records and recorded 'Try Me' and 'I Know My Baby Cares'. After a dispute with Capitol Records over changing his name, which he refused to do, Bob Luman was dropped by the label.

In 1959, Bob Luman signed with Warner Bros. Records and recorded 'Class of '59' and 'Loretta'.

In 1960, shortly before being drafted by the United States Army, Bob Luman saw the release of the single 'Let's Think About Living'; the track hit the Top 10 while he was in the service. Although he never had another song on the pop music singles chart, 'Let's Think About Living' began a long string of country music hits.

In November 1960, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Let's Think About Livin' (Warner Bros. Records, 1960), which was produced by Wesley Rose (Monday 11 February 1918 - Thursday 26 April 1990) and included one track which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

'Let's Think About Livin', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) (No.9, 1960) / this track also reached No.7 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1960, No.3 on the Kent Music Report Chart in Australia, also in 1960, and reached the Top 10 in the UK pop music singles chart (also in 1960)

Bob Luman's 'Let's Think About Livin' (Warner Bros. Records, 1960) also included the following tracks:

'Meet Mr. Mud' (written by John D. Loudermilk)
'Bad Bad Day', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Every Time The World Goes Round' (written by Bob Montgomery and Earl Sinks)
'Jealous Heart' (written by Jenny Lou Carson)
'I Love You Because', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969)
'Oh, Lonesome Me', which was Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Throwin' Kisses' (written by John D. Loudermilk)
'Why Why Bye Bye', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003)
'Dreamy Doll', which was written by Ron Hardgrove and Sheb Wooley (Sunday 10 April 1921 - Tuesday 16 September 2003)
'I Love You So Much (It Hurts)', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)

Following his discharge from the army in 1962, Bob Luman moved to Nashville.

Bob Luman and Barbara Nancy Tisman were married in Yuma, Colorado on Wednesday 12 August 1964; their daughter, Melissa Claire Luman, was born on Friday 17 June 1966.

Bob Luman became a member of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville in August 1965 and toured regularly. Bob became a popular attraction in Las Vegas by mixing country music and rockabilly in his live shows. The family who had been living in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee, moved to Hendersonville, TN in 1968 and became neighbours with Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) and Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) on the banks of Old Hickory Lake.

It was also in 1965 that Bob Luman saw the release of 'Livin' Lovin' Sounds' (Hickory Records, 1965), which included one track which was a hit single on the country music singles chart:

'File' (written by John Loudermilk) (No.24, 1964)

Bob Luman's 'Livin' Lovin' Sounds' (Hickory Records, 1965) also included the following tracks:

'I Love You Because', which was written by Leon Payne (Friday 15 June 1917 - Thursday 11 September 1969)
'Oh, Lonesome Me', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Hey Joe', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'Bad Bad Day', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Louisiana Man', which was written by Doug Kershaw
'You Win Again', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953)
'Great Snowman' (written by John D. Loudermilk)
'Go On Home Boy' (written by John D. Loudermilk)
'Jealous Heart' (written by Jenny Lou Carson)
'I Love You So Much (It Hurts)', which was written by Floyd Tillman (Tuesday 8 December 1914 - Friday 22 August 2003)
'Let's Think About Livin', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)

In early 1968, Bob Luman signed with Epic Records and saw the release, in June 1968, of 'Ain't Got Time To Be Unhappy' (Epic Records, 1968), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ain't Got Time To Be Unhappy', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.19, 1968)

Bob Luman's 'Ain't Got Time To Be Unhappy' (Epic Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'Release Me (And Let Me Love Again)' (written by Eddie Miller, W.S. Stevenson and Robert Yount)
'I Can't Remember To Forget' (written by Billy Graham)
'Someday You'll Call My Name' (written by Jean Branch and Eddie Hill)
'Have Alittle Faith', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Memphis, Tennessee' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Let's Think About Livin', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'Say It's Not You' (written by Dallas Frazier)
'Happiness Is My Belief' (written by Jean Chapel)
'Almost Persuaded', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Sally Was A Good Ole Girl', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)

In June 1969, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Come On Home And Sing The Blues To Daddy' (Epic Records, 1969), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and included three tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Like Trains', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.50, 1968)
'Woman Without Love' (written by Jerry Chesnut) / this track did not chart when released in 1968
'Come On Home And Sing The Blues To Daddy' (written by Ray Corbin) (No.24, 1969)

Bob Luman's 'Come On Home And Sing The Blues To Daddy' (Epic Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'World Of Unhappiness' (written by Rita Welty)
'Big Big World' (written by Fred Burch, Gerald Nelson and Red West)
'Tomorrow's Gonna Be Better Than Today' (written by Bill Anderson)
'I Ain't Built That Way', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'I'm In This Town For Good' (written by Paul Evans)
'Ten Years Of Life' (written by John Scoggins and Gary Parker)
'Guitar Man', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Sunday 31 August 2008)

Personnel involved in the recording of Bob Luman's 'Come On Home And Sing The Blues To Daddy' (Epic Records, 1969) included the following:

Billy Sanford, Pete Wade, Jimmy Capps, Harold Bradley, Ray Edenton and Jimmy Colvard (guitar)
Lloyd Green and Pete Drake (steel guitar)
Bob Moore and Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Kenneth Buttrey (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, electric bass, organ, vibes)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (vocals)

In April 1970, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Gettin' Back To Norma' (Epic Records, 1970), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Everyday I Have To Cry Some' (written by Arthur Alexander) (No.23, 1969)
'The Gun', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (No.60, 1969)
'Gettin' Back To Norma' (written by Ray Griff) (No.56, 1970)

Bob Luman's 'Gettin' Back To Norma' (Epic Records, 1970) also included the following tracks:

'Livin' In A House Full Of Love', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Cleanin' Up The Streets Of Memphis' (written by Joseph Luman)
'Makin' a Mountain out of a Molehill', which was written by Ray Griff ()
'Maybelline' (written by Chuck Berry, Alan Freed and Russ Fratto)
'Brown Eyed Handsome Man' (written by Chuck Berry)
'I'm A Lonesome Fugitive', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011) and Casey Anderson
'I Don''t Care If The Sun Don't Shine' (written by Mack David)
'Knee Deep In The Blues' (written by Melvin Endsley)

Personnel involved in the recording of Bob Luman's 'Gettin' Back To Norma' (Epic Records, 1970) included the following:

Jerry Kennedy (guitar, dobro, sitar)
Billy Sanford, Harold Bradley, Ray Edenton and Chip Young (guitar)
Lloyd Green and Pete Drake (steel guitar)
Bob Moore and Henry Strzelecki (bass)
Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Johnny Gimble (fiddle)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes, trumpet)
George Tidwell (trumpet)

In May 1971, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (Epic Records, 1971), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Honky Tonk Man', which was written by Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960), Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Howard Hausey (No.22, 1970)
'What About The Hurt' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.44, 1970)
'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.60, 1971)

Bob Luman's 'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (Epic Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'Give Us One More Chance' (written by Erwin Curtis)
'You're Making It Too Hard For Me To Go' (written by Neal Merritt and Shorty Hall)
'Sorry Excuse For A Man' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Your Kind Of Man' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Freeborn Man' (written by Keith Allison and Mark Lindsay)
'Time To Remember' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Mobile Satisfaction', which was written by Mack Vickery (Wednesday 8 June 1938 - Tuesday 21 December 2004) and Charles Cobbie
'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006)

In November 1971, Bob Luman saw the release of 'A Chain Don't Take To Me' (Epic Records, 1971), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I Got A Woman', which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004) (No.40, 1971)
'Chain Don't Take To Me', which was written by Dallas Frazier and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) (No.30, 1971)

Bob Luman's 'A Chain Don't Take To Me' (Epic Records, 1971) also included the following tracks:

'Geisha Girl', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)
'Filipino Baby' (written by Billy Cox and Clarke VanNess)
'One Hundred Songs On The Jukebox', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Hugh X. Lewis
'Don't Let Love Pass You By' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Ain't Got Time To Be Unhappy', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Fraulein', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007)
'Mexican Joe' (written by Mitchell Torok)
'Good Things Stem From Rock And Roll', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'There's A Big Wheel', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)

Personnel involved in the recording of Bob Luman's 'A Chain Don't Take To Me' (Epic Records, 1971) included the following:

Billy Sanford and Pete Wade (guitar)
Ray Edenton and Chip Young (rhythm guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (rhythm guitar, banjo)
Hal Rugg, Pete Drake and Russ Hicks (steel guitar)
Wayne Vest, Roy Huskey Junior (Monday 17 December 1956 - Saturday 6 September 1997) and Bobby Dyson (bass)
D.J. Fontana and Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Jerry Smith (piano)
Buddy Spicher and Grover Lavender (fiddle)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, trumpet, vibes)
The Jordanaires and The Nashville Edition (vocals)

In March 1972, Bob Luman saw the release of 'When You Say Love' (Epic Records, 1972), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'When You Say Love' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.6, 1972)

Bob Luman's 'When You Say Love' (Epic Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'Woman Without Love' (written by Jerry Chesnut)
'Honky Tonk Man', which was written by Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960), Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006) and Howard Hausey
'Have A Little Faith', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'What About The Hurt' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Come On Home And Sing The Blues To Daddy' (written by Ray Corbin)
'Is It Any Wonder That I Love You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Cleanin' Up The Streets Of Memphis' (written by Joseph Luman)
'One Hundred Songs On The Jukebox', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Hugh X. Lewis
'Let's Think About Livin', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987)
'Almost Persuaded', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)

In October 1972, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Lonely Women Make Good Lovers' (Epic Records, 1972), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It Takes You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.21, 1972)
'Lonely Women Make Good Lovers' (written by Freddy Weller and Spooner Oldham) (No.4, 1972)

Bob Luman's 'Lonely Women Make Good Lovers' (Epic Records, 1972) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Gonna Write A Song', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Delta Dawn', which was written by Alex Harvey and Larry Collins
'Love Ought To Be A Happy Thing', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Bob Luman
'Woman I Just Want To Love You More' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'I'm A One Woman Man', which was written by Johnny Horton (Thursday 30 April 1925 - Saturday 5 November 1960) and Tillman Franks (Wednesday 29 September 1920 - Thursday 26 October 2006)
'Easy Lovin' (written by Freddie Hart)
'Sweet Baby Jane' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Sugar Man', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Bill Dees
'Someone To Give My Love To' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)

Personnel involved in the recording of Bob Luman's 'Lonely Women Make Good Lovers' (Epic Records, 1972) included the following:

Billy Sanford, Pete Wade, Tommy Allsup, Jimmy Capps, Bill Rice, Ray Edenton, Chip Young and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (banjo)
Pete Drake (steel guitar)
Bob Moore and Bobby Dyson (bass)
D.J. Fontana, Buddy Harman (Sunday 23 December 1928 - Thursday 21 August 2008) and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) (piano, organ)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, vibes)
The Jordanaires (vocals)

In April 1973, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Neither One Of Us' (Epic Records, 1973), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Neither One Of Us (Wants To Be The First To Say Goodbye)' (written by Jim Weatherly) (No.7, 1973)
'Good Love Is Like A Good Song' (written by Casey Kelly) (No.23, 1973)

Bob Luman's 'Neither One Of Us' (Epic Records, 1973) also included the following tracks:

'It Wasn't Easy' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Anything But Lonesome', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'Pass Me By (If You're Only Passing Through)' (written by Hillman Hall)
'Have You Ever Said I Love You To A Lady' (written by Buddy Cannon and Steve Smith)
'Because Of Losing You' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Tonight Your Baby's Coming Home', which was written by Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007)
'A Picture Of Me (Without You)', which was written by Norro Wilson and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010)
'Baby Made It Good' (written by Buddy Cannon and Steve Smith)
'Uncle Sam', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) / this track featured guest vocals from Glenn Sutton

In 1974, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Red Cadillac And A Black Mustache' (Epic Records, 1974), which was produced by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007), and included one track which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Let Me Make The Bright Lights Shine For You' (written by Troy Seals and Will Jennings) (No.25, 1974)

Bob Luman's 'Red Cadillac And A Black Mustache' (Epic Records, 1974) also included the following tracks:

'Red Cadillac And A Black Mustache' (written by Lillian May)
'Closest Thing To Heaven' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Six Days On The Road', which was written by Earl Green and Carl Montgomery (Wednesday 6 December 1933 - Friday 20 December 1974)
'Long Black Veil', which was written by Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006) and Danny Dill
'Mama Tried', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'Bye Bye Love', which was written by Boudleaux Bryant (Friday 13 February 1920 - Thursday 25 June 1987) and Felice Bryant (Friday 7 August 1925 - Tuesday 22 April 2003)
'You Left The Door Wide Open', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Johnny B. Goode' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Mystery Train' (written by Sam Phillips and Herman Parker)
'Someone To Finish What You Started', which was written by Glenn Sutton (Tuesday 28 September 1937 - Tuesday 17 April 2007) and Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)

In 1976, Bob Luman saw the release of 'A Satisfied Mind' (Epic Records, 1976), which was produced by Billy Sherrill and Norro Wilson, and which included five tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Proud Of You Baby' (written by Billy Sherrill and Norro Wilson) (No.22, 1975)
'Shame On Me', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007) and Bill Enis (No.48, 1975)
'A Satisfied Mind' (written by Red Hayes and Jack Rhodes) (No.41, 1976)
'The Man From Bowling Green', which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) (No.82, 1976)
'How Do You Start Over', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Bill Dees (No.89, 1976)

Bob Luman's 'A Satisfied Mind' (Epic Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Chokin' Kind', which was written by Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)
'Snap Your Fingers' (written by Alex Zanetis and Grady Martin)
'It's Only Make Believe', which was written by Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) and Jack Nance
'Girl In My Life' (written by Steve Davis, Sammy Lyons and Mark Sherrill)
'Nothing Ever Hurt Her (Quite Like Me)' (written by Jerry Chesnut)

In January 1977, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Alive And Well' (Epic Records, 1977), which was produced by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003), and included two tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Labor Of Love' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.94, 1976)
'He's Got A Way With Women' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.63, 1977)

Bob Luman's 'Alive And Well' (Epic Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'I Still Miss Someone', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) and Ray Cash
'Big River', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Here We Are Making Love Again' (written by Ronald Saucer and Michael Schrimpf)
'Got To Have Room To Change My Mind' (written by Steve Wariner)
'Blond Haired Woman' (written by Steve Wariner)
'Get Rhythm', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)
'Sweet Dreams', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003)
'Hey Porter', which was written by Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003)

Personnel involved in the recording of Bob Luman's 'Alive And Well' (Epic Records, 1977) included the following:

Rip Wilson, Paul Yandell and Steve Wariner (guitar)
Weldon Myrick (steel guitar)
Joe Osborn (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) and Michale Schrimpf (drums)
David Byrd (piano)

In February 1978, Bob Luman saw the release of 'Bob Luman' (Polydor Records, 1978), which was produced by Jim Vienneau, and included three tracks which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'I'm A Honky Tonk Woman's Man' (written by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice) (No.33, 1977)
'Pay Phone' (written by Glenn Martin) (No.13, 1977)
'Proud Lady' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.47, 1978)

Bob Luman's 'Bob Luman' (Polydor Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'Jesus Was A Country Boy' (written by Billy Ed Wheeler and Grover Norwood)
'Lonely Women (Don't Need To Be Lonely)' (written by Steve Wariner)
'(All My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers', which was written by Liz Anderson (Monday 13 January 1930 - Monday 31 October 2011)
'Put 'Em All Together And I'd Have You' (written by Even Stevens)
'Let Me Love Him Out Of You' (written by Wayland Holyfield)
'He'll Be The One' (written by Steve Wariner)
'Wicked Lovin' Ways' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield)
'Somebody's Gonna Do It Tonight' (written by Ben Peters)

Bob Luman performed, for the last time, on the hallowed stage of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on Friday 15 December 1978.

Bob Luman died of pneumonia in Nashville on Wednesday 27 December 1978 and was buried in Hendersonville Memory Gardens in Hendersonville, Tennessee.

Following Bob Luman's death, Bear Family Records, based in Germany, released several of his records, including 'More of The Rocker' (Bear Family Records, 1979), 'Still Rockin' (Bear Family Records, 1984) and 'Carnival Rock' (Bear Family Records, 1984).

Bob Luman is a member of both The Rockabilly Hall of Fame and The Texas Country Music Hall of Fame.


Barbara Nancy Luman Tisman was born in Vancouver, Canada on Sunday 4 August 1940; after meeting Bob Luman, she moved to Hendersonville, Tennessee where she stayed for thirty-five years, until she returned to British Columbia in 1999, where she lived until her death on Thursday 2 August 2007.

A celebration of Barbara Nancy Luman's wonderful life was held on Wednesday 29 August 2007 at 11:00am from the Chapel of Hendersonville Memory Gardens & Funeral Home, located at 353 Johnny Cash Parkway in Hendersonville, Tennessee.

Find Melissa Luman Phillips on Facebook

CMP



Country Music People is Europe’s number one country music magazine.

Country Music People is the specialist expert on country music - past, present and future.

Hux Records



Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

Gene Watson Fan Site