• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2010, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Steve Wariner, which he submitted to this site on Monday 25 January 2010.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Steve Wariner who made a special contribution to this unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Steve Wariner
This quote was submitted on Monday 25 January 2010.

'I would be honoured to give a quote about one of my very favourites, Gene Watson.

At the risk of sounding clichéd, Gene Watson is like fine wine; just getting better and better!

He is the consummate professional...Gene is the real deal.


I love Gene Watson.  He is a real deal country singer.  You always know he's gonna deliver!

Besides that, he's one of the nicest guys in the world'.


Thank you, Steve Wariner, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Steve Wariner...



Steve Wariner, fresh from winning his fourth Grammy Award, is the hotshot Nashville guitarist and million-selling country star who is paying homage to the most recorded solo instrumentalist in history.



'Steve Wariner, c.g.p., My Tribute to Chet Atkins' (SelecTone Records, 2009) is a loving reflection of the many playing styles that the late Country Music Hall of Fame member performed during his journey from Appalachian obscurity to international superstardom.  On this outstanding collection, Steve Wariner even plays some of the guitars that Chet gave him over the years.

'Chet was an amazing man',
remarks Steve.  'Nobody who plays the guitar has ever forgotten him.  He played with so much heart.  In doing this project, I found myself replaying some of his performances over and over, listening closely and wondering, 'How in the world did he do that?'.

Until you put the microscope on it, you kind of take his playing for granted.  He'll do this backwards roll on the strings or something.  It might go right by your ear, but then you try to imitate it.  It sounds simple, but it’s not simple.  Try to do what he does technically.  Then try to do it with his touch, tone and feeling, and you’re reminded that you can’t out-Chet Chet.  He was something else'.



The legendary Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), recorded more than one hundred instrumental albums.  He could and did play mountain music, swing, rockabilly, pop, folk and jazz.

'Steve Wariner, c.g.p., My Tribute to Chet Atkins' touches all of these bases as the fleet-fingered Steve Wariner moves from track to track.

Sometimes Steve performs the same music that Chet Atkins did - 'Back Home Again in Indiana', 'Producer's Medley' and the tricky 'Blue Angel', for instance.  But more often, Steve Wariner has written and recorded original tunes that emulate the distinctive Atkins styles.  'Leaving Luttrell' reflects Chet's East Tennessee childhood.  'Leona' is a gorgeous pop tune dedicated to the guitarist’s widow.



'Tuned In' pays homage to Chet Atkins’ late-career, contemporary jazz style on albums such as 'Stay Tuned' (Columbia Records, 1984).  'Silent Strings' is a ballad Steve Wariner wrote about the loss the music world felt with Chet’s passing.  The only full vocal performance on the disc is Steve Wariner's upbeat rendering of 'Chet's Guitar'.

Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008)

'Reeding Out Loud' tips its hat to Jerry Reed (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008), one of Chet Atkins’ greatest discoveries.

Not long before Jerry Reed passed away, Steve Wariner took a copy of 'Reeding Out Loud' to the elder guitarist's home.  Jerry put the headphones on, leaned back and shut his eyes.  As the tune ended, he smiled with his eyes still closed and wisecracked, 'This is why I hate you so'.

Few in Nashville, or anywhere else, are as envied on so many levels as Steve Wariner.  He has been acclaimed for his guitar prowess, his heartfelt singing, his expert producing and his hit song-writing.

Steve Wariner's lengthy recording career began with the kindness and vision of Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001).

'I'd just turned 18 and was playing bass in Dottie West's band', Steve recalls.  'I took my first airplane ride, and it was to go to London to do a tour called The Cavalcade of Stars.  Dottie West (Tuesday 11 October 1932 - Wednesday 4 September 1991) was on RCA Records and so were all of the others - Bobby Bare, Jim Ed Brown (Sunday 1 April 1934 - Thursday 11 June 2015) and Danny Davis & The Nashville Brass.  I was excited to death, because Chet was on part of that tour.

My dad had all his albums, and I’d grown up putting the needle down on the tunes over and over again, trying to figure out how Chet did what he did.  Just like I’m still doing today.

We were in the back of the dressing room at Wembley Stadium in London, and that was my opportunity.  I remember it was freezing.

There was no heat, and we all had colds.  I walked in and introduced myself.  He was so nice.  I remember being struck by the fact that he treated me like I was somebody.  He was so kind.


A few years later, I was working in Bob Luman's band.  He was making a comeback, and he was thrilled that Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) was going to be producing an album on him.

Bob Luman (Thursday 15 April 1937 - Wednesday 27 December 1978) was picking up on my song-writing, so he wanted me to play bass on the record and to sing some of my songs'.



In 1977, Bob Luman (Thursday 15 April 1937 - Wednesday 27 December 1978) saw the release of the Johnny Cash-produced 'Alive & Well' (Epic Records, 1977), which included four Steve Wariner compositions; 'Got to Have Room to Change My Mind', 'Blond Haired Woman', 'Labour of Love' and 'He's Got a Way with Women'.

'I came to the session and played my songs in front of Johnny Cash (Friday 26 February 1932 - Friday 12 September 2003) and everybody.

Bob Luman wound up recording four of my songs.  On that recording session was guitarist Paul Yandell, who was Chet's right-hand guy for many years.  He took me aside and said, 'I’m going to take a tape to Chet, because I think he'd really like your picking and singing'.


Well, Chet called me at my Mom and Dad's house.  I picked up the phone.

He said,
'This is Chet Atkins'.  I said, 'Shut up, Kenny'.  I thought it was my brother messing with me.  Chet laughed and said, 'No, it really is me.  Paul told me to call you'.  He wanted to hear more, so I came down to Nashville from Kentucky immediately.

He took me into RCA Studio B to make a test recording.  He said, 'Play some guitar.  I'll record that'.  And I played one of Chet's songs, with him sitting right there.  What an idiot I was.  I'm so embarrassed even now I can't remember what the song was.

He started talking about someone else to produce my records.  I said, 'Nope.  I want you to produce me, Chet'.  I learned later, years down the line, that he was stepping away from RCA at the time and really wasn't wanting to take on anybody.

The very first thing I recorded with Chet producing was my song 'I’m Already Taken' (co-written with Terence Ryan).  It flopped (No.63, 1978).

But twenty years later, when I re-recorded it for Capitol Records, it was a big hit.  So that tells you that Chet really had an ear.  He really knew what he was doing'.


 

Steve Wariner recorded 'I'm Already Taken' (co-written with Terence Ryan) and included the track on 'Steve Wariner' (RCA Records, 1982); he re-recorded the track and included it on 'Two Teardrops' (Capitol Records, 1999).



Bob Luman (Thursday 15 April 1937 - Wednesday 27 December 1978) recorded Steve Wariner's 'He'll Be The One (Who's Hurtin')' and included the track on 'Bob Luman' (Polydor Records, 1978).



In September 1982, Steve Wariner saw the release of his self-titled debut album, 'Steve Wariner' (RCA Victor Records, 1982), which included six tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Memory' (written by Charles Quillen and John Schweers) (No.7, 1980)
'By Now', which was written by Dean Dillon, Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Charles Quillen (No.6, 1981)
'All Roads Lead to You' (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan) (No.1 for one week in December 1981)
'Kansas City Lights' (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan) (No.15, 1982)
'Don't It Break Your Heart', which was written by Mack David (5 July 1912 - Thursday 30 December 1993) and Archie Jordan (No.30, 1982)
'Don't Plan on Sleepin' Tonight' (No.27, 1983)

Steve Wariner's self-titled debut album, 'Steve Wariner' (RCA Victor Records, 1982), reached No.35 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.



With his early RCA singles faltering on the charts - 'So Sad (to watch good love go bad)' (No.76, 1978), 'Marie' (No.94, 1978), 'Forget Me Not' (No.49, 1979) and 'The Easy Part's Over' (No.41, 1980) - and Bob Luman having died on Wednesday 27 December 1978, Steve Wariner was out of work for the first and only time in his life.  His mentor, Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001), came to the rescue.

'I travelled with Chet for a year and a half, starting in 1979.  He hired me to play bass in his band.  We went to Hawaii, Europe, England.  In the middle of the show, he'd feature me on guitar doing some songs.  It was so generous of him and very cool.

Then two things happened.  He called me in one day and said, 'You’re never going to have a hit with me producing you, because I'm stepping away from the label'.

I was devastated, of course.  But Chet was right.  I got with Tom Collins.

The first single with Tom was 'Don't Your Memory Ever Sleep at Night'.  It immediately became my first Top 10 hit, bang, right out of the chute'.



Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded Steve Wariner's 'I'm Already Taken' (co-written with Terry Ryan) and included the track on 'Mr. T' (MCA Records, 1981).



In November 1983, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'Midnight Fire' (RCA Victor Records, 1983), which included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Don't You Memory Ever Sleep at Night' (written by Steve Dean) (No.23, 1983) / Chet Alkins called Steve Wariner in and said, 'Your record is going into the Top 10 next week.  You're fired'.  Steve Wariner went, 'What? Why?'  He said, 'You need to go out and do your own thing and get your own band.  Get out of here'.  Steve Wariner said, 'Holy crap!  I've just been fired by Chet Atkins.  Chet loved to tell that story.  He used to tell it all the time'.
'Midnight Fire' (written by Dave Gibson and Lewis Anderson) (No.5, 1983)
'Lonely Women Make Good Lovers' (written by Freddy Weller and Spooner Oldham) (No.4, 1983)
'Why Goodbye' (written by Richard Leigh and Mark Wright) (No.12, 1984)
'Don't You Give Up on Love' (No.49, 1984)

Steve Wariner's 'Midnight Fire' (RCA Victor Records, 1983) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.

After seven years with RCA Victor Records, Steve Wariner moved to MCA Records and stardom.



In January 1985, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'One Good Night Deserves Another' (MCA Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What I Didn't Do' (written by Wood Newton and Michael Noble) (No.3, 1984)
'Heart Trouble', which was written by Dave Gibson and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) (No.8, 1985)
'Some Fools Never Learn' (written by John Scott Sherrill) (No.1 for one week in November 1985)

Steve Wariner's 'One Good Night Deserves Another' (MCA Records, 1985) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country albums Chart in 1985.



In December 1985, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'Life's Highway' (MCA Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You Can Dream of Me' (written by Steve Wariner and John Hall) (No.1 for one week in March 1986)
'Life's Highway' (written by Richard Leigh and Roger Murrah) (No.1 for one week in June 1986)
'Starting Over Again' (written by Don Goodman and John Wesley Ryles) (No.4, 1986)

Steve Wariner's 'Life's Highway' (MCA Records, 1985) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.



In 1986, Nicolette Larson (Thursday 17 July 1952 - Tuesday 16 December 1997) saw the release of 'Rose of My Heart' (MCA Records, 1986), which included 'That's How You Know When Love's Right' (written by Craig Bickhardt and Wendy Waldman); the track featured guest vocals from Steve Wariner and reached No.9 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1986.



In March 1987, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'It's a Crazy World' (MCA Records, 1987), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Small Town Girl' (written by John Jarvis and Don Cook) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1987)
'Weekend' (written by Bill LaBounty and Beckie Foster) (No.1 for one week in July / August 1987)
'Lynda' (written by Bill LaBounty and Pat MacLaughlin) (No.1 for one week in November / December 1987)

Steve Wariner's 'It's a Crazy World' (MCA Records, 1987) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.



In August 1987, Glen Campbell saw the release of 'Still Within The Sound of My Voice' (MCA Records, 1987); the album included 'The Hand That Rocks The Cradle' (written by Ted Harris), a duet with Steve Wariner, which reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987.



In September 1987, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records, 1987), which included the following tracks:

'What I Didn't Do' (written by Wood Newton and Michael Noble)
 (No.3, 1984)
'Heart Trouble', which was written by Dave Gibson and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) (No.8, 1985)
'Some Fools Never Learn' (written by John Scott Sherrill) (No.1 for one week in November 1985)
'You Can Dream of Me' (written by Steve Wariner and John Hall) (No.1 for one week in March 1986)
'Life's Highway' (written by Richard Leigh and Roger Murrah) (No.1 for one week in June 1986)
'That's How You Know When Love's Right' / this track was new and exclusive to this collection
'Starting Over Again' (written by Don Goodman and John Wesley Ryles) (No.4, 1986)
'Small Town Girl' (written by John Jarvis and Don Cook) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1987)
'Weekend' (written by Bill LaBounty and Beckie Foster) (No.1 for one week in July / August 1987)
'Lynda' (written by Bill LaBounty and Pat MacLaughlin) (No.1 for one week in November / December 1987)

Steve Wariner's 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records, 1987) reached No.25 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987.



In March 1988, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'I Should Be With You' (MCA Records, 1988), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Baby I'm Yours' (written by Steve Wariner and Guy Clark) (No.2, 1988)
'I Should Be with You' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.2, 1988)
'Hold On (a little longer)' (written by Steve wariner and Randy Hart) (No.6, 1988)

Steve Wariner's 'I Should Be With You' (MCA Records, 1988) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.



In 1989, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'I Got Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where Did I Go Wrong' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.1 for one week in June 1989) / this track featured supporting vocals from Mac McAnally
'I Got Dreams' (written by Steve Wariner and Bill LaBounty) (No.1 for one week in October 1989)
'When I Could Come Home to You' (written by Steve Wariner and Roger Murrah) (No.5, 1989)

Steve Wariner's 'I Got Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989) also included 'Nothin' in the World (gonna keep me from you)', which was written by Steve Wariner and Mike Reid.

Steve Wariner's 'I Got Dreams' (MCA Records, 1989) reached No.32 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.



On Wednesday 28 February 1990, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'Laredo' (MCA Records, 1990), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'The Domino Theory' (written by Bill LaBounty and Beckie Foster) (No.7, 1990)
'Precious Thing' (written by Steve Wariner and Mac McAnally) (No.8, 1990)
'There for Awhile' (written by Curtis Wright and Anna Lisa Graham) (No.17, 1990)

Steve Wariner's 'Laredo' (MCA Records, 1990) also included the following tracks:

'L-O-V-E, Love' (written by Steve Wariner and Lisa Silver)
'She's in Love' (written by Mike Reid and Rory Bourke)
'While I'm Holding You Tonight' (written by Steve Wariner and Roger Murrah)
'When Times were Hard' (written by Steve Wariner and Don Schlitz)

Steve Wariner's 'Laredo' (MCA Records, 1990) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990.



In 1990, Steve Wariner was a special vocal guest on two tracks on Glen Campbell's 'Walkin' in The Sun' (Capitol Records, 1990); 'You Will Not Lose', which was written by Allen Toussaint (Friday 14 January 1938 - Tuesday 10 November 2015), and 'Woodcarver' (written by Rusty Wolfe), the latter track also featured guest vocals from Lacy J. Dalton.

Following the release of Steve Wariner's final single for MCA Records, 'There for Awhile' (written by Curtis Wright and Anna Lisa Graham), which reached No.17 in 1990), he was dropped from MCA's roster.



On Tuesday 16 April 1991, Mark O'Connor saw the release of 'The New Nashville Cats' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991), which was recorded in conjunction with a variety of other musical artists.  Mark O'Connor selected a group of over fifty Nashville musicians, many of who had worked with him as session musicians.  The album was intended to 'showcase the instrumental side of the Nashville recording scene' (as stated in Mark O'Connor's liner notes).

Mark O'Connor's 'The New Nashville Cats' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) was awarded two Grammy Awards: 'Best Country Instrumental Performance' for Mark O'Connor, and 'Best Country Collaboration with Vocals' for Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Steve Wariner's performance of 'Restless', which was written by Carl Perkins (Saturday 9 April 1932 - Monday 19 January 1998);this track also reached No.25 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1991.

Mark O'Connor's 'The New Nashville Cats' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) also included 'Now It Belongs to You' (written by Steve Wariner).

Mark O'Connor's 'The New Nashville Cats' (Warner Bros. Records, 1991) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991.



In 1991, Steve Wariner signed to Arista Nashville Records and saw the release, on Tuesday 22 October 1991, of 'I am Ready' (Arista Nashville Records, 1991), which included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Leave Him Out of This' (written by Walt Aldridge and Susan Longacre)
(No.6, 1991)
'The Tips of My Fingers' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.3, 1992)
'A Woman Loves' (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles) (No.9, 1992)
'Crash Course in The Blues' (written by Don Cook, John Barlow Jarvis and Steve Wariner) (No.32, 1992)
'Like a River to the Sea' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.30, 1993)

Steve Wariner's 'I am Ready' (Arista Nashville Records, 1991) also included the following tracks:

'On My Heart Again' (written by Bob DiPiero, Dennis Robbins and John Scott Sherrill)
'When Will I Let Go' (written by Steve Wariner and Jim Weatherly)
'Everything's Gonna Be Alright' (written by Bill LaBounty and Steve Wariner)
'My, How The Time Don't Fly', which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) and Steve Wariner
'Gone Out of My Mind' (written by Gene Dobbins, Michael Huffman and Bob Morrison)

Personnel involved in the recording of Steve Wariner's 'I am Ready' (Arista Nashville Records, 1991) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums, percussion)
Bruce C. Bouton, Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015), Sonny Garrish and Allyn Love (steel guitar)
Carol Chase, Bob DiPiero, Vince Gill, John Scott Sherrill, Harry Stinson, Billy Thomas, Wendy Waldman and Andrea Zonn (background vocals)
Bill Cuomo (organ)
Steve Gibson (12-string guitar, mandolin)
Scott Hendricks (acoustic guitar, piano)
David Hungate (bass guitar)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, Wurlitzer)
Albert Lee and Reggie Young (electric guitar)
Mac McAnally (acoustic guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion, harmonica)
Mark O'Connor (fiddle)
Steve Wariner (lead vocals, background vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar)

Steve Wariner's 'I am Ready' (Arista Nashville Records, 1991) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1991, No.180 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1991, and No.16 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1991.

Steve Wariner's 'I am Ready' (Arista Nashville Records, 1991) was certified 'Gold' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), Steve Wariner's first album to achieve that certification.



Kenny Rogers recorded Steve Wariner's 'I'm Missing You' and included the track on 'If Only My Heart Had a Voice' (Giant Records, 1993).



On Tuesday 27 July 1993, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'Drive' (Arista Nashville Records, 1993), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'If I Didn't Love You' (written by Jon Vezner and Jack White) (No.8, 1993)
'Drivin' & Cryin' (written by Rick Giles and Spike Blake) (No.24, 1993)
'It Won't Be Over You' (written by Trey Bruce and Thom McHugh) (No.18, 1994)
'Drive' (written by Steve Wariner and Bill LaBounty) (No.63, 1994)

Steve Wariner's 'Drive' (Arista Nashville Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

'One Believer' (written by Walt Aldridge and Susan Longacre)
'(You Could Always) Come Back' (written by Marc Beeson and Robert Byrne)
'The Same Mistake Again' (written by Steve Wariner and Carl Jackson)
'Missing You' (written by Rick Giles and Susan Longacre)
'Married to a Memory' (written by Dave Loggins)
'Sails' (written by Joanna Hall and John Hall)

Personnel involved in the recording of Steve Wariner's 'Drive' (Arista Nashville Records, 1993) included the following:

Grace Bahng (cello)
Eddie Bayers and Tom Roady (drums)
Bill Cuomo (synthesizer)
David Davidson and Connie Heard (violin)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Carl Jackson, Bill LaBounty, Dave Loggins, Harry Stinson and Billy Thomas (background vocals)
John Barlow Jarvis (keyboards, piano)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Mac McAnally (acoustic guitar, background vocals)
Michael Rhodes (bass guitar)
Catherine Styron (keyboards)
Steve Wariner (lead vocals, background vocals, electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Kristin Wilkinson (viola)

Steve Wariner's 'Drive' (Arista Nashville Records, 1993) reached No.51 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993, and No.19 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1993.



Clay Walker recorded Steve Wariner's 'Love Me Like You Love Me' (co-written with Bill LaBounty) and included the track on 'Hypnotize The Moon' (Giant Records, 1995).



In 1995, Liberty Records released 'Come Together: America Salutes The Beatles' (Liberty Records, 1995), a tribute album to The Beatles, which featured covers of various Beatles songs, performed by country music artists.

The album cover for 'Come Together: America Salutes The Beatles' (Liberty Records, 1995) featured artwork by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980).

Steve Wariner's cover of 'Get Back', which was written by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980) and Paul McCartney, reached No.72 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1995.

'Come Together: America Salutes The Beatles' (Liberty Records, 1995) reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995, No.90 on the Billboard Top 200 albums Chart in 1995, and No.5 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1995.



On Tuesday 12 March 1996, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'No More Mr. Nice Guy' (Arista Nashville Records, 1996), an instrumental album, which was Steve Wariner's final album for Arista Nashville Records.

No singles were released from the album, although 'The Brickyard Boogie' was nominated for 'Best Country Instrumental' at the Grammy Awards of 1997; this song featured former Pearl River member Derek George (who would later go on to found the band Williams Riley), former Boy Howdy member Jeffrey Steele, as well as Bryan White and Bryan Austin.



In 1996, Steve Wariner was invited into the prestigious cast of The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.



Lisa Brokop recorded Steve Wariner's 'At The End of The Day' (co-written with Billy Kirsch) and included the track on 'Lisa Brokop' (Capitol Records, 1996).



Alabama recorded Steve Wariner's 'Christmas in Your Arms' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'Christmas 2' (RCA Records, 1996).



Garth Brooks recorded Steve Wariner's 'Longneck Bottle' (co-written with Garth Brooks) and included the track on 'Sevens' (Capitol Nashville Records, 1997); the track, which was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for one week in December 1997 / January 1998, featured Steve Wariner on acoustic guitar and background vocals.



Clint Black recorded Steve Wariner's 'Nothing But The Taillights' (co-written with Clint Black) and included the track on 'Nothing But The Taillights' (RCA Records, 1997); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for one week in March 1998.



Clint Black recorded Steve Wariner's 'You Know It All' (co-written with Clint Black) and included the track on 'Nothing But The Taillights' (RCA Records, 1997).



Bryan White recorded Steve Wariner's 'One Small Miracle' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'The Right Place' (Asylum Records, 1997); the track reached No.16 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998.



On Tuesday 21 April 1998, Steve Wariner saw the release of 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (Capitol Records, 1998), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Holes in the Floor of Heaven' (written by Billy Kirsch and Steve Wariner) (No.2, 1998) / this track was named 'Single of the Year' and 'Song of the Year' by the Country Music Association (CMA), and 'Song of the Year' by the Academy of Country Music (ACM)
'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (written by Rick Carnes and Steve Wariner) (No.26, 1998) this track was a duet with Garth Brooks / 'Road Trippin' (written by Marcus Hummon and Steve Wariner), which was the B-side to the title track, also charted at No.55 as a result of unsolicited airplay
'Every Little Whisper' (written by Billy Kirsch and Steve Wariner) (No.36, 1998)



Steve Wariner's 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (Capitol Records, 1998) also included 'What If I Said' (written by Anita Cochran), which was the second single from Anita Cochran's debut album, 'Back to You' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for one week in February / March 1998.

Steve Wariner's 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (Capitol Records, 1998) also included the following tracks:

'A Six Pack Ago' (written by Jim Rushing and Steve Wariner)
'Love Me Like You Love Me' (written by Bill LaBounty and Steve Wariner)
'Smoke from an Old Flame' (written by Jim Weatherly and Steve Wariner)
'I Don't Know How to Fix It' (written by Bill Anderson and Steve Wariner)
'Big Ol' Empty House' (written by Mac McAnally and Steve Wariner)
'Closer I Get to You' (written by Keith Sewell and Steve Wariner)
'Big Tops' (written by Marcus Hummon and Steve Wariner)

Personnel involved in the recording of Steve Wariner's 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (Capitol Records, 1998) included the following:

Garth Brooks (vocals on 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down')
Anita Cochran (vocals on 'What If I Said')
Bill Cuomo (synthesizer)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015), Paul Franklin and Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Ron Gannaway, John Gardner and Paul Leim (drums)
Hoot Hester (fiddle, mandolin)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, keyboards)
Woody Lingle and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Brent Mason and Reggie Young (electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Harry Stinson, Trisha Yearwood and Andrea Zonn (background vocals)
Steve Wariner (lead vocals, background vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, Dobro)
Nashville String Machine (strings; conducted by Carl Gorodetzky and arranged by Bergen White)

Steve Wariner's 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (Capitol Records, 1998) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998, No.41 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1998, and No.15 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1998.

Steve Wariner's 'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (Capitol Records, 1998) was the second album of Steve Wariner's career to achieve Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) 'Gold' certification for United States sales of 500,000 copies.



In August 1998, Bill Anderson saw the release of 'Fine Wine' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998); one of the included tracks was 'The Tips of My Fingers' (written by Bill Anderson), which featured guest vocals from Eddy Arnold (Wednesday 15 May 1918 - Thursday 8 May 2008), Roy Clark, Jean Shepard and Steve Wariner.

Collin Raye recorded Steve Wariner's 'Make Sure You Got It All' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'The Walls Came Down' (Epic Records, 1998).



Keith Urban recorded Steve Wariner's 'Where The Blacktop Ends' (co-written with Allen Shamblin) and included the track on 'Keith Urban' (Capitol Records, 1999).



Lila McCann recorded Steve Wariner's 'You're Gone' (co-written with Bryan White) and included the track on 'Something in the Air' (Asylum Records, 1999).



Clint Black recorded Steve Wariner's 'Been There' (co-written with Clint Black) and included the track on 'D'lectrified' (RCA Records, 1999); the track was a duet with Steve Wariner and reached No.5 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 2000.



Clint Black recorded Steve Wariner's 'Where Your Love Won't Go' (co-written with Clint Black) and included the track on 'D'lectrified' (RCA Records, 1999).



Collaborating with his fellow stars has also led to two more Grammy Awards for Steve Wariner.

Steve Wariner's 1999 'Bob’s Breakdown' Western Swing instrumental with Ray Benson & Asleep at The Wheel, which was included on 'Ride with Bob' (DreamWorks Records, 1999), earned the music world's highest accolade.



Kathy Mattea recorded Steve Wariner's 'Trust Me' (co-written with Kathy Mattea) and included the track on 'The Innocent Years' (MCA Records, 2000).



The Statler Brothers recorded Steve Wariner's 'Darlin' I Do' (co-written with Gordon Kennedy) and included the track on 'Showtime' (Crossroads Records, 2001).



Bill Anderson recorded Steve Wariner's 'Love is a Fragile Thing' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'A Lot of Things Different' (Varese Records, 2001).



Diamond Rio recorded Steve Wariner's 'Make Sure You Got It All' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'Completely' (Arista Records, 2002).



Gene Watson recorded Steve Wariner's 'Make Sure You Got It All' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'Gene Watson...Sings' (Intersound Records, 2003).



Kenny Rogers recorded Steve Wariner's 'I'm Missing You' (co-written with Billy Kirsch) and included the track on 'Back to The Well' (Dreamcatcher Records, 2003).



Clint Black recorded Steve Wariner's 'A Lover's Clown' (co-written with Clint Black) and included the track on 'Spend My Time' (Equity Music Group, 2004).



Clint Black recorded Steve Wariner's 'Drinkin' Songs & Other Logic' and included the track on 'Drinkin' Songs & Other Logic' (Equity Records, 2005).



Garth Brooks recorded Steve Wariner's 'You Can't Help Who You Love' (co-written with Marcus Hummon) and included the track on 'The Lost Sessions' (Pearl Records, 2006).



Brad Paisley recorded Steve Wariner's 'More Than Just This Song' (co-written with Brad Paisley) and included the track on 'Play' (Arista Records, 2008); the track featured guest vocals from Steve Wariner.



Steve Wariner's 2009 Grammy Award win was for 'Cluster Pluck', an instrumental collaboration with Brad Paisley and stellar guitarists James Burton, Vince Gill, Albert Lee, John Jorgenson, Brent Mason and Redd Volkaert; the track was included on Brad Paisley's 'Play' (Arista Records, 2008).



In the new millennium, Steve Wariner and his wife Caryn formed their own record label, SelecTone Records.



 

 

'Steve Wariner, c.g.p., My Tribute to Chet Atkins' (SelecTone Records, 2009) was Steve Wariner's fourth collection for the company, following 'Steal Another Day' (SelecTone Records, 2003), 'Guitar Christmas' (SelecTone Records, 2003) and 'This Real Life' (SelecTone Records, 2005).

'I’ve been thinking about doing this for a long time', said Steve.  'Chet meant so much to me, so much to the world.

Aside from his body of work as a player, a great artist and musician, look at his work as a record producer and a label executive.  It's astounding.

There will never be anybody who will touch what he did on all levels'.

Chet Atkins gave himself the title 'c.g.p.' (for Certified Guitar Player).

Only four other men were so honoured by the legendary picker: Tommy Emmanuel, John Knowles, the late Jerry Reed ()…and the great Steve Wariner, whose 'My Tribute to Chet Atkins' (SelecTone records, 2009) is his personal statement of deepest gratitude.

Steve Wariner Biography, courtesy of Robert K. Oermann and Karen Byrd Public Relations
Photo of Steve Wariner, courtesy of Karen Byrd Public Relations, Franklin, Tennessee



The 52nd Grammy Awards ceremony was held at Los Angeles' Staples Centre on Sunday 31 January 2010 and was broadcast 'live', in the United States, on the East Coast, and on tape delay, on the West Coast.



Steve Wariner was announced as the winner of the 'Best Country Instrumental Performance' for 'Producer's Medley', a track from his highly acclaimed 'Steve Wariner, c.g.p., My Tribute to Chet Atkins' (SelecTone Records, 2009).



Sammy Sadler recorded Steve Wariner's 'I'll Always Have Denver' (co-written with Bill Anderson) and included the track on 'Heart Shaped Like Texas' (S Records, 2012); the track was a duet with Steve Wariner.



Steve Wariner has achieved quite a remarkable run of hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart, as evidenced by this extraordinary list:

'Your Memory' (written by Charles Quillen and John Schweers)
 (No.7, 1980)
'By Now', which was written by Dean Dillon, Don Pfrimmer (Thursday 9 September 1937 - Monday 7 December 2015) and Charles Quillen (No.6, 1981)
'All Roads Lead to You' (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan) (No.1 for one week in December 1981)
'Kansas City Lights' (written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan) (No.15, 1982)
'Midnight Fire' (written by Dave Gibson and Lewis Anderson) (No.5, 1983)
'Lonely Women Make Good Lovers' (written by Freddy Weller and Spooner Oldham) (No.4, 1983)
'Why Goodbye' (written by Richard Leigh and Mark Wright) (No.12, 1984)
'What I Didn't Do' (written by Wood Newton and Michael Noble) (No.3, 1984)
'Heart Trouble', which was written by Dave Gibson and Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) (No.8, 1985)
'Some Fools Never Learn' (written by John Scott Sherrill) (No.1 for one week in November 1985)
'You Can Dream of Me' (written by Steve Wariner and John Hall) (No.1 for one week in March 1986)
'Life's Highway' (written by Richard Leigh and Roger Murrah) (No.1 for one week in June 1986)
'That's How You Know When Love's Right' (written by Craig Bickhardt and Wendy Waldman) (No.9, 1986) / this track was a duet with Nicolette Larson (Thursday 17 July 1952 - Tuesday 16 December 1997)
'Starting Over Again' (written by Don Goodman and John Wesley Ryles) (No.4, 1986)
'Small Town Girl' (written by John Jarvis and Don Cook) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1987)
'Weekend' (written by Bill LaBounty and Beckie Foster) (No.1 for one week in July / August 1987)
'The Hand That Rocks The Cradle' (written by Ted Harris) (No.5, 1987) / this track was a duet with Glen Campbell
'Lynda' (written by Bill LaBounty and Pat MacLaughlin) (No.1 for one week in November / December 1987)
'Baby I'm Yours' (written by Steve Wariner and Guy Clark) (No.2, 1988)
'I Should Be with You' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.2, 1988)
'Hold On (a little longer)' (written by Steve wariner and Randy Hart) (No.6, 1988)
'Where Did I Go Wrong' (written by Steve Wariner) (No.1 for one week in June 1989)
'I Got Dreams' (written by Steve Wariner and Bill LaBounty) (No.1 for one week in October 1989)
'When I Could Come Home to You' (written by Steve Wariner and Roger Murrah) (No.5, 1989)
'The Domino Theory' (written by Bill LaBounty and Beckie Foster) (No.7, 1990)
'Precious Thing' (written by Steve Wariner and Mac McAnally) (No.8, 1990)
'There for Awhile' (written by Curtis Wright and Anna Lisa Graham) (No.17, 1990)
'Leave Him Out of This' (written by Walt Aldridge and Susan Longacre) (No.6, 1991)
'The Tips of My Fingers' (written by Bill Anderson) (No.3, 1992)
'A Woman Loves' (written by Steve Bogard and Rick Giles) (No.9, 1992)
'If I Didn't Love You' (written by Jon Vezner and Jack White) (No.8, 1993)
'Drivin' & Cryin' (written by Rick Giles and Spike Blake) (No.24, 1993)
'It Won't Be Over You' (written by Trey Bruce and Thom McHugh) (No.18, 1994)
'Drive' (written by Steve Wariner and Bill LaBounty) (No.63, 1994)
'What If I Said' (written by Anita Cochran) (No.1 for one week in February / March 1998) / this track was a duet with Anita Cochran
'Holes in the Floor of Heaven' (written by Billy Kirsch and Steve Wariner) (No.2, 1998)
'Burnin' The Roadhouse Down' (written by Rick Carnes and Steve Wariner) (No.26, 1998) this track was a duet with Garth Brooks
'Two Teardrops' (written by Bill Anderson and Steve Wariner) (No.2, 1999)
'I'm Already Taken' (written by Steve Wariner and Terry Ryan) (No.3, 1999) / this track was a re-recording
'Been There' (written by Steve Wariner and Clint Black) (No.5, 2000) / this track was a duet with Clint Black
'Katie Wants a Fast One' (written by Steve Wariner and Rick Carnes) (No.22, 2000)

• Visit Steve Wariner's Official Site at stevewariner.com

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