• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2008, were most gracious with their time and words.  It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Sammy Kershaw, which he submitted to this site on Saturday 5 January 2008.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Sammy Kershaw who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Sammy Kershaw
This quote was submitted on Saturday 5 January 2008.

'Gene Watson is one of the greatest vocalists in the history of country music, and a very nice man.

There are not many left in this business like Gene Watson.

God bless!'

Thank you, Sammy Kershaw, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Sammy Kershaw...



Sammy Kershaw was born on Monday 24 February 1958 in Abbeville, Louisiana and was raised in Kaplan, Louisiana; Sammy is the third cousin of Cajun fiddler Doug Kershaw.  Sammy Kershaw was the eldest of four children and tragically lost his father when he was eleven years old.

It was also at the age of eleven that Sammy Kershaw got his first guitar, a gift from his grandfather.  Thereafter he worked a variety of jobs by day while playing roadhouses at night in order to support his family.

Sammy Kershaw began performing in Acadiana with Louisiana legend J.B. Pere.

Sammy Kershaw subsequently opened shows for Ray Price (Tuesday 12 January 1926 - Monday 16 December 2013), Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) while barely into his teens.

When the pressures of growing up fast took their toll in the form of a serious drug and alcohol problem, Sammy Kershaw quit his bad habits in 1988 and took a break from music to work as a remodelling supervisor at Wal-Mart.

One of Sammy Kershaw's demonstration tapes made its way to Mercury Records, who released his debut album, 'Don't Go Near The Water' (Mercury Records, 1991) on Tuesday 8 October 1991; the album was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and produced four Billboard country music hit singles.



On Tuesday 8 October 1991, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of his debut album, 'Don't Go Near The Water' (Mercury Records, 1991), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Cadillac Style' (written by Mark C. Petersen) (No.3, late 1991 / early 1992)
'Don't Go Near The Water' (written by Chapin Hartford and Jim Foster) (No.12, 1992)
'Yard Sale' (written by Larry Bastian and Dewayne Blackwell) (No.17, 1992)
'Anywhere but Here' (written by Buddy Cannon, Bob DiPiero and John Scott Sherrill) (No.10, 1992)

Sammy Kershaw's debut album, 'Don't Go Near The Water' (Mercury Records, 1991), also included the following tracks:

'Real Old-Fashioned Broken Heart' (written by Bob McDill)
'I Buy Her Roses' (written by Roger Brown and Glenn Ray)
'Kickin' In' (written by Roger Murrah and Keith Stegall)
'What am I Worth', which was written by Darrell Edwards and George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Every Third Monday' (written by Larry Cordle, Larry Shell and Billy Henderson)
'Harbor for a Lonely Heart' (written by Kostas and Jenny Yates)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's debut album, 'Don't Go Near The Water' (Mercury Records, 1991), included the following:

Kenny Bell (acoustic guitar)
David Briggs and Costo Davis (keyboards)
Glen Duncan (fiddle)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, dobro)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 - Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Danny Parks (acoustic guitar, fiddle)
Larry Paxton (bass guitar, keyboards)
Billy Sanford (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)

Sammy Kershaw was initially reluctant to release 'Cadillac Style' because he felt that it was not suitable for his style.

However, one of Sammy Kershaw's producers, Buddy Cannon, convinced him to give the song a chance.

Sammy Kershaw's often honky-tonk material and singing voice led to critical comparisons to George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013).

George Jones:'Grand Ole Opry's New Star' (Starday Records, 1956)

One of George Jones' early singles, 'What am I Worth' (written by George Jones and Darrell Edwards), which was included on George Jones' debut album, 'Grand Ole Opry's New Star' (Starday Records, 1956) and reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1956, was included on Sammy Kershaw's debut album, 'Don't Go Near The Water' (Mercury Records, 1991).

Sammy Kershaw's debut album, 'Don't Go Near The Water' (Mercury Records, 1991), reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992.



On Tuesday 9 March 1993, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Haunted Heart' (Mercury Records, 1993), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'She Don't Know She's Beautiful' (written by Paul Harrison and Bob McDill) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1993)
'Haunted Heart', which was written by Buddy Brock and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016) (No.9, 1993)
'Queen of My Double-Wide Trailer', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.7, 1993)
'I Can't Reach Her Anymore' (written by Mark Petersen and Bruce Theien) (No.3, 1994)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Haunted Heart' (Mercury Records, 1993), also included the following tracks:

'A Memory that Just Won't Quit' (written by Walt Aldridge and Susan Longacre)
'Still Lovin' You' (written by Rock Killough)
'Neon Leon' (written by Larry Bastian and Buddy Cannon)
'What Might Have Been' (written by Dean Dillon and Donny Kees)
'You've Got a Lock on My Love' (written by Larry Bastian and Buddy Cannon)
'Cry, Cry Darlin', which was written by J. D. 'Jay' Miller and Jimmy C. Newman (Monday 29 August 1927 - Saturday 21 June 2014)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's 'Haunted Heart' (Mercury Records, 1993) included the following:

Kenny Bell (acoustic guitar)
David Briggs (keyboards)
Mike Chapman (bass guitar)
Melonie Cannon (background vocals)
Costo Davis (keyboards)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, dobro)
Steve Gibson (electric guitar)
Rob Hajacos and Ossie Osment (fiddle)
Bill Hullett and John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Jerry Kroon and Steve Turner (drums)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica, percussion)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Danny Parks (acoustic guitar, mandolin)
Larry Paxton (bass guitar)
Mike Severs (electric guitar)
Shania Twain, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Haunted Heart' (Mercury Records, 1993) was certified 'Platinum' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in 1993, and reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993.

 

On Tuesday 21 June 1994, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Feelin' Good Train' (Mercury Records, 1994), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'National Working Woman's Holiday' (written by James Dean Hicks, Roger Murrah and Pat Terry) (No.2, 1994)
'Third Rate Romance' (written by Russell Smith) (No.2, 1994)
'Southbound' (written by Mac McAnally) (No.27, 1995)
'If You're Gonna Walk, I'm Gonna Crawl' (written by Larry Bastian and Buddy Cannon) (No.18, 1995)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Feelin' Good Train' (Mercury Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

'Feelin' Good Train' (written by Al Anderson and Mike Lawler)
'If You Ever Come This Way Again' (written by Dean Dillon and Donny Kees)
'Better Call a Preacher' (written by Sammy Kershaw, Steven D. Cohen and Rick Lagneaux)
'Paradise from Nine to One' (written by Rick Bowles, Pat Bunch and Josh Leo)
'Too Far Gone to Leave' (written by Rock Killough and Larry T. Wilson)
'The Heart That Time Forgot' (written by Tony Martin and Sterling Whipple)
'Never Bit a Bullet Like This' (written by Jim Foster and Mark C. Petersen) / this track, which was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), had previously been included on George Jones' 'High Tech Redneck' (MCA Records, 1993)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's 'Feelin' Good Train' (Mercury Records, 1994) included the following:

David Briggs (piano)
Gary Burr (background vocals on 'Third Rate Romance')
Mike Chapman (bass guitar on 'Never Bit a Bullet Like This')
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Mike Chapman (bass guitar)
Mike Lawler (keyboards)
Paul Leim (drums)
Mac McAnally (background vocals on 'Southbound')
Brent Mason (electric guitar on 'Never Bit a Bullet Like This')
Joey Miskulin (accordion)
Danny Parks (acoustic guitar)
Russell Smith (background vocals on 'Third Rate Romance')
Jo-El Sonnier (accordion)
Cindy Richardson Walker, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Lonnie Wilson (drums on 'Never Bit a Bullet Like This')
Reggie Young (electric guitar)
Strings: The Nashville String Machine, conducted by Carl Gorodetzky

Sammy Kershaw's 'Feelin' Good Train' (Mercury Records, 1994) reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994 and was certified 'Gold' by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).



On Tuesday 4 October 1994, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of his first seasonal album, 'Christmas Time's A-Coming' (Mercury Records, 1994), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson, and included a mix of traditional songs and newly recorded material.

The title track, a bluegrass holiday standard written by Benjamin 'Tex' Logan, charted in 1995 and 1998 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart, reaching No.50 in 1995 and No.53 in 1998.

Sammy Kershaw's first seasonal album, 'Christmas Time's A-Coming' (Mercury Records, 1994), included the following tracks:

'We Three Kings (Part 1)' (written by John Henry Hopkins)
'Christmas Time's A-Comin' (written by Tex Logan)
'White Christmas' (written by Irving Berlin)
'Please Come Home for Christmas' (written by Charles Brown and Gene Redd)
'Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer' (written by Johnny Marks)
'Frosty the Snowman' (written by Walter Rollins and Steve Nelson)
'Daddy Stuff' (written by Rock Killough)
'Winter Wonderland' (written by Felix Bernard and Dick Smith)
'All I Want for Christmas is You' (written by Troy Powers and Andy Stone)
'Christmas Won't Be Christmas (without you here)' (written by Steven D. Cohen and Rick Lagneaux)
'Up on the House Top' (written by Benjamin Hanby) / this track was a duet with Sammy Kershaw's daughter Erin
'We Three Kings (Part 2)' (written by John Henry Hopkins)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's first seasonal album, 'Christmas Time's A-Coming' (Mercury Records, 1994), included the following:

Mike Chapman (bass guitar)
Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 - Thursday 7 June 2007) (keyboards)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Michael Haynes, Douglas Moffett, William Puett, Don Sheffield and Dennis Solee (horns)
Sammy Kershaw (lead vocals)
Paul Leim (drums)
Sam Levine (clarinet)
Farrell Morris (percussion)
Nashville String Machine (strings)
Danny Parks (acoustic guitar)
Wayne Toups (accordion)
Pete Wade (gut string guitar)
Reggie Young (electric guitar)
Kim Fleming, Jana King, Lisa Silver, Louis Nunley (of The Jordanaires) (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012) and Bergen D. White (backing vocals on 'White Christmas', 'Please Come Home for Christmas', 'Daddy Stuff' and 'All I Want for Christmas is You')
Cindy Walker, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (backing vocals on 'Christmas Time's A-Comin', 'Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer', 'Frosty the Snowman', 'Winter Wonderland', 'Christmas Won't Be Christmas (without you here)' and 'Up on The House Top'



On Tuesday 12 September 1995, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'The Hits, Chapter 1' (Mercury Records, 1995), his first 'Greatest Hits' album, which included the following tracks:

'Cadillac Style' (written by Mark C. Petersen) (No.3, late 1991 / early 1992)
'Don't Go Near The Water' (written by Chapin Hartford and Jim Foster) (No.12, 1992)
'Yard Sale' (written by Larry Bastian and Dewayne Blackwell) (No.17, 1992)
'Anywhere but Here' (written by Buddy Cannon, Bob DiPiero and John Scott Sherrill) (No.10, 1992)
'She Don't Know She's Beautiful' (written by Paul Harrison and Bob McDill) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1993)
'Haunted Heart', which was written by Buddy Brock and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016) (No.9, 1993)
'Queen of My Double-Wide Trailer', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.7, 1993)
'I Can't Reach Her Anymore' (written by Mark Petersen and Bruce Theien) (No.3, 1994)
'National Working Woman's Holiday' (written by James Dean Hicks, Roger Murrah and Pat Terry) (No.2, 1994)
'Third Rate Romance' (written by Russell Smith) (No.2, 1994)
'Your Tattoo' (written by Kostas and Jack Tempchin) (No.47, 1995) / this track was the first single of Sammy Kershaw's career which did not reach the Billboard Hot Country Top 40 singles chart
'Still Lovin' You' (written by Rock Killough) / this track, which was originally included on Sammy Kershaw's 'Haunted Heart' (Mercury Records, 1993), was never released as a single



On Tuesday 7 May 1996, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Politics, Religion & Her' (Mercury Records, 1996), which was produced by Buddy Cannon, Keith Stegall and Norro Wilson, and which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Meant to Be' (written by Rick Bowles and Chris Waters) (No.5, 1996)
'Vidalia' (written by Tim Nichols and Mark D. Sanders) (No.10, 1996)
'Politics, Religion & Her' (written by Byron Hill and Tony Martin) (No.28, 1997)
'Fit to be Tied Down' (written by Wynn Varble and Charles Victor) (No.29, 1997)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Politics, Religion & Her' (Mercury Records, 1996) also included the following:

'Chevy Van', which was written by Sammy Johns (Thursday 7 February 1946 - Friday 4 January 2013)
'Same Place' (written by Buddy Cannon, Marla Cannon-Goodman and Dean Dillon)
'Little Bitty Crack in Her Heart' (written by Shawn Camp and Jim Rushing)
'These Flowers' (written by Rick Giles)
'I Saw You Today' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Memphis, Tennessee' (written by Chuck Berry)
'For Years', which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011) and Stacey Earle
'Here She Comes' (written by Sammy Kershaw)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's 'Politics, Religion & Her' (Mercury Records, 1996) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Glen Duncan and Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (Dobro, steel guitar)
Sonny Garrish and Hal Rugg (steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
John Hobbs and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Paul Leim (drums)
Brent Mason and Reggie Young (electric guitar)
Nashville String Machine (strings)
Steve Nathan (organ, piano)
Danny Parks and John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Larry Paxton and Glenn Worf (bass)
John Wesley Ryles and Dennis Wilson (background vocals)



On Tuesday 4 November 1997, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Labor of Love' (Mercury Records, 1997), which was produced by Keith Stegall, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks and Chart:

'Love of My Life' (written by Keith Stegall and Ed Hill) (No.2, 1997)
'Matches' (written by Skip Ewing and Roger Springer) (No.22, 1998)
'Honky Tonk America' (written by Bob McDill) (No.31, 1998)
'One Day Left to Live' (written by Dean Dillon, Randy Boudreaux and John Northrup) (No.35, 1999)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Labor of Love' (Mercury Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

'Shootin' The Bull (in an old cowtown)' (written by Monty Criswell and Michael White)
'Cotton County Queen', which was written by Wally Wilson, Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004) and Phil Barnhart
'Labor of Love' (written by Larry Boone and Billy Lawson)
'Thank God You're Gone' (written by Sammy Kershaw and Mike Fornes)
'Little Did I Know' (written by Bill McCorvey, Greg Crowe and Dave Gibson)
'Arms Length Away' (written by Monty Criswell, Lee Miller and Michael White)
'Roamin' Love' (written by Sammy Kershaw)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's 'Labor of Love' (Mercury Records, 1997) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Stuart Duncan and Joe Spivey (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (keyboards)
John D. Willis (acoustic guitar)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
John Wesley Ryles (background vocals)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Labor of Love' (Mercury Records, 1997) was the third album of his career to achieve Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) 'Platinum' certification, and was also Sammy Kershaw's highest-charting album on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart, where it peaked at No.5 in 1997.

 

On Tuesday 13 May 1999, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of his final album for Mercury Records, 'Maybe Not Tonight' (Mercury Records, 1999), which was produced by Keith Stegall and was Sammy Kershaw's first album not to achieve Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) certification; the album also failed to produce any Billboard Top Ten country music hit singles.

Sammy Kershaw's 'Maybe Not Tonight' (Mercury Records, 1999) included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Maybe Not Tonight' (written by Keith Stegall and Dan Hill) (No.17, 1999) / this track was a duet with Lorrie Morgan and was concurrently promoted by Mercury Records and BNA Records, Lorrie Morgan's then record label; the track was also included on Lorrie Morgan's 'My Heart' (BNA Records, 1999)
'When You Love Someone' (written by Keith Stegall and Dan Hill) (No.37, 1999)
'Me & Maxine' (written by Gordon Bradberry and Michael Lunn) (No.35, 2000)
'Louisiana Hot Sauce' (written by Sammy Kershaw and Keith Stegall) / this track, which was released as a single in 2000, failed to chart

Sammy Kershaw's 'Maybe Not Tonight' (Mercury Records, 1999) also included the following tracks:

'Without Strings' (written by Steven Dale Jones)
'More Than I Can Say' (written by Jerry Allison and Sonny Curtis) / this track was a cover of Leo Sayer's 'More Than I Can Say', which was a No.2 pop music hit single in the United Kingdom in 1980
'Love Me, Loving You' (written by Sammy Kershaw, Gregg Wright, Mike Fornes and Gary McGuire)
'I've Never Gone This Far Before' (written by Carson Chamberlain, Gary Harrison and Keith Stegall)
'Ouch' (written by Tom Shapiro and Al Anderson)
'How Can I Say No' (written by Sammy Kershaw)
'Look What I Did To Us' (written by Carson Chamberlain, Gary Harrison and Keith Stegall)
'How Much Does the World Weigh' (written by Lee Thomas Miller and Michael White)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's 'Maybe Not Tonight' (Mercury Records, 1999) included the following:

Eddie Bayers (drums)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
John Kelton (keyboards)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Gary Prim (keyboards)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)
Keith Stegall ('wangy guitar')
John D. Willis (acoustic guitar)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
John Wesley Ryles (background vocals)

Following the release of Sammy Kershaw's 'Maybe Not Tonight' (Mercury Records, 1999), Mercury Records issued an album of cover songs and a second 'Greatest Hits' compilation prior to Sammy Kershaw exiting the record label.



On Tuesday 20 June 2000, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Covers The Hits' (Mercury Records, 2000), an album of cover songs; the album comprised ten cover songs which Sammy Kershaw had recorded during the course of his career and also included a rendition of Dr. Hook's 'Little Bit More', a previously unreleased cover which Sammy Kershaw had recorded during the sessions for 'Labor of Love' (Mercury Records, 1997).

Sammy Kershaw's 'Covers The Hits' (Mercury Records, 2000) included the following tracks:



'Third Rate Romance' (written by Russell Smith) / this track was originally recorded by Amazing Rhythm Aces / this track was included on Sammy Kershaw's 'Feelin' Good Train' (Mercury Records, 1994), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson



'More Than I Can Say' (written by Jerry Allison and Sonny Curtis) / this track was originally recorded by Leo Sayer in 1980 / this track was included on Sammy Kershaw's 'Maybe Not Tonight' (Mercury Records, 1999)



'If I Fell', which was written by John Lennon (Wednesday 9 October 1940 - Monday 8 December 1980) and Paul McCartney / this track was originally recorded by The Beatles in 1964 / the track was Sammy Kershaw's contribution to 'Come Together: America Salutes The Beatles' (Liberty Records, 1995)



'Chevy Van', which was written by Sammy Johns (Thursday 7 February 1946 - Friday 4 January 2013) / this track was originally recorded by Sammy Johns in 1975 / this track was included on Sammy Kershaw's 'Politics, Religion & Her' (Mercury Records, 1996)



'Fire & Rain' (written by James Taylor) / this track was originally recorded by James Taylor in 1970 / this track was Sammy Kershaw's contribution to 'Red Hot + Country' (Mercury Records, 1994)



'Memphis, Tennessee' (written by Chuck Berry) / this track was originally recorded by Chuck Berry in 1959 / this track was included on Sammy Kershaw's 'Politics, Religion & Her' (Mercury Records, 1996)



'Angie' (written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards) / this track was originally recorded by The Rolling Stones in 1973 / this track was Sammy Kershaw's contribution to 'Stone Country: Country Artists Perform' The Songs of The Rolling Stones' (Beyond Records, 2001)



'I Got A Name', which was written by Jim Croce (Sunday 10 January 1943 - Thursday 20 September 1973) / this track was originally recorded by Jim Croce (Sunday 10 January 1943 - Thursday 20 September 1973) in 1973 / this track was Sammy Kershaw's contribution to 'Jim Croce: A Nashville Tribute' (River North Records, 1997)



'I Know a Little' (written by Steve Gaines) / this track was originally recorded by Lynyrd Skynyrd in 1977 / this track was Sammy Kershaw's contribution to 'Skynyrd Frynds' (MCA Records, 1994)

'A Little Bit More' (written by Bobby Gosh) / this track was originally recorded by Dr. Hook in 1976 / Sammy Kershaw's version of this track was previously unreleased

Producers involved in the production of tracks on Sammy Kershaw's 'Covers The Hits' (Mercury Records, 2000) included the following:

Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson (tracks 1 and 4)
Keith Stegall (tracks 2, 6, 7 and 10)
Jerry Crutchfield and Martin Crutchfield (track 3)
Buddy Cannon, Norro Wilson and Sammy Kershaw (tracks 5 and 9)
Keith Stegall and Ira Antelis (track 8)



By 2001, Sammy Kershaw and Lorrie Morgan had married.



On Tuesday 17 April 2001, Lorrie Morgan & Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'I Finally Found Someone' (RCA Nashville Records, 2001), a vocal duet album, the title track of which was a cover of the Bryan Adams / Barbra Streisand duet.

Lorrie Morgan & Sammy Kershaw's 'I Finally Found Someone' (RCA Nashville Records, 2001) included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'He Drinks Tequila' (written by Shawn Camp and Michele McCord) (No.39, 2001)

Lorrie Morgan & Sammy Kershaw's 'I Finally Found Someone' (BNA Records, 2001) also included the following tracks:

'I Finally Found Someone' (written by Barbra Streisand, Bryan Adams, Marvin Hamlisch and Robert John 'Mutt' Lange)
'Big Time' (written by Jim Collins and Leslie Satcher)
'I Can't Think of Anything but You' (written by Skip Ewing, David Feritta and Alan Rich)
'Be My Reason' (written by Dale Dodson, Billy Lawson and John Northrup)
'29 Again' (written by Dave Berg, Deanna Bryant and Rivers Rutherford)
'What a Wonderful World' (written by Bob Thiele and George David Weiss)
'Sad City' (written by Bryan Keith Burns and Mark Oliverius)
'That's Where I'll Be' (written by Sammy Kershaw and Lorrie Morgan)
'Sugar' (written by Sammy Kershaw)
'I Must be Gettin' Older' (written by Lorrie Morgan)
'3 Seconds' (written by Jeffrey Steele, Anthony Smith and Chris Wallin)

Lorrie Morgan & Sammy Kershaw's 'I Finally Found Someone' (RCA Nashville Records, 2001) reached No.13 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2001.



On Tuesday 15 May 2001, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'The Hits, Chapter 2' (Mercury Records, 2001), his second 'Greatest Hits' album and the counterpart to 'The Hits, Chapter 1' (Mercury Records, 1995); the album featured eleven of Sammy Kershaw's greatest hits from his fourth through sixth albums.  No new material was recorded for this album.

Sammy Kershaw's 'The Hits, Chapter 2' (Mercury Records, 2001) included the following tracks:

'Love of My Life' (written by Keith Stegall and Ed Hill) (No.2, 1997)
'Vidalia' (written by Tim Nichols and Mark D. Sanders) (No.10, 1996)
'Politics, Religion & Her' (written by Byron Hill and Tony Martin) (No.28, 1997)
'Matches' (written by Skip Ewing and Roger Springer) (No.22, 1998)
'Louisiana Hot Sauce' (written by Sammy Kershaw and Keith Stegall/ this track, which was released as a single in 2000, failed to chart
'Maybe Not Tonight' (written by Keith Stegall and Dan Hill) (No.17, 1999) / this track was a duet with Lorrie Morgan and was promoted by both Mercury Records and BNA Records; the track was also included on Lorrie Morgan's 'My Heart' (BNA Records, 1999)
'Meant to Be' (written by Rick Bowles and Chris Waters) (No.5, 1996)
'Southbound' (written by Mac McAnally) (No.27, 1995)
'Me & Maxine' (written by Gordon Bradberry and Michael Lunn) (No.35, 2000)
'When You Love Someone' (written by Keith Stegall and Dan Hill) (No.37, 1999)
'Honky Tonk America' (written by Bob McDill) (No.31, 1998)

Following the release, on Tuesday 15 May 2001, of Sammy Kershaw's 'The Hits, Chapter 2' (Mercury Records, 2001), Sammy Kershaw left Mercury Records.



In 2003, Sammy Kershaw signed with Audium Records / Koch Entertainment and saw the release, on Tuesday 25 March 2003, of 'I Want My Money Back' (Audium Records / Koch Entertainment, 2003); the album included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'I Want My Money Back' (written by Dave Berg, Annie Tate and Sam Tate) (No.33, 2003)
'I've Never Been Anywhere' (written by Dean Dillon and Jim Collins) (No.58, 2003)
'Beer, Bait & Ammo' (written by Kevin Fowler) / this track, which was released as a single in 2003, failed to chart

 

Kevin Fowler recorded 'Beer, Bait & Ammo' (written by Kevin Fowler) and included the track on his debut album, 'Beer, Bait & Ammo' (Tin Roof Records, 2000); the track was also recorded by Mark Chesnutt, who included the track on 'Savin' The Honky Tonk' (Vivaton Records, 2004).

Sammy Kershaw's 'I Want My Money Back' (Audium Records / Koch Entertainment, 2003) also included the following tracks:

'Miss What's Her Name' (written by Jason Campbell and Greg Hanna)
'Metropolis' (written by Anthony Smith and Chris Wallin)
'Sunday Morning on Bourbon Street' (written by Ward Davis and Dan Murph)
'Stitches' (written by Anthony Smith)
'28/83 (she ain't in it for the love)' (written by Casey Beathard, Billy Currington and Carson Chamberlain)
'Gone For Good Goodbye' (written by Hugh Prestwood)
'The Paper Heart' (written by Nelson Blanchard, Scott Innes and Claude Parrish)
'Are You Having Fun Yet?' (written by Dave Brainard, Jason Campbell and Lonnie Williams)

Personnel involved in the recording of Sammy Kershaw's 'I Want My Money Back' (Audium Records / Koch Entertainment, 2003) included the following:

Glen Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Richard Landis (electric piano, percussion)
Paul Leim (drums)
B. James Lowry (acoustic guitar)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Jimmy Nichols (synthesizer, background vocals)
Dave Pomeroy (bass guitar)
Matt Rollings (piano)
John Wesley Ryles, Russell Terrell, Dennis Wilson and Curtis Young (background vocals)

Sammy Kershaw's 'I Want My Money Back' (Audium Records / Koch Entertainment, 2003) reached No.39 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2003.



In 2006, following the closure of Audium Records / Koch Entertainment's Nashville division, Sammy Kershaw signed with Category 5 Records, then a newly-established independent label, and saw the release, on Tuesday 27 June 2006, of 'Honky Tonk Boots' (Category 5 Records, 2006).

Sammy Kershaw's 'Honky Tonk Boots' (Category 5 Records, 2006) included two tracks which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Tennessee Girl' (written by Bob DiPiero and Craig Wiseman) (No.43, 2006)
'Baby's Got Her Blue Jeans On' (written by Bob McDill) / this track, which was released as a single in 2006, failed to chart

'Honky Tonk Boots' (Category 5 Records, 2006) also reunited Sammy Kershaw with producers Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson, who co-produced Sammy's first four albums.

Three cover songs were included on Sammy Kershaw's 'Honky Tonk Boots' (Category 5 Records, 2006):

Mel McDaniel: 'Let It Roll' (Records, 1984)

'Baby's Got Her Blue Jeans On' (written by Bob McDill) / this track was originally recorded by Mel McDaniel (Sunday 6 September 1942 - Thursday 31 March 2011), who included the track on 'Let It Roll' (Records, 1984); Mel McDaniel's version of 'Baby's Got Her Blue Jeans On' was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February / March 1985



'Evangeline' (written by Bob McDill and Carson Chamberlain) / this track was originally recorded by Chad Brock, who included the track on his self-titled debut album, 'Chad Brock' (Warner Bros. Records, 1998), which was produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson; Chad Brock's version of 'Evangeline' reached No.51 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998



'The Battle' , which was written by Norro Wilson, George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) and Linda Kimball / this track was originally recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), who included the track on 'The Battle' (Epic Records, 1976); George Jones' version of 'The Battle' reached No.14 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1976

Sammy Kershaw's 'Honky Tonk Boots' (Category 5 Records, 2006) also included the following tracks:

'Honky Tonk Boots' (written by Scott Blackwell and Billy Don Burns)
'One Step at a Time' (written by Tim Menzies)
'Leavin' Made Easy' (written by Jeffrey Steele and Jon Robbin)
'High Society' (written by Bob McDill and Dickey Lee)
'Mama's Got a Tattoo' (written by Ronnie Samoset and Alan Dysert)
'Cantaloupes on Mars', which was written by Danny 'Bear' Mayo (Monday 2 October 1950 - Saturday 2 October 1999)

Sammy Kershaw's 'Honky Tonk Boots' (Category 5 Records, 2006) reached No.56 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2006.

In 2007, financial difficulties caused Category 5 Records to close.

In October 2007, Sammy Kershaw divorced Lorrie Morgan, citing irreconcilable differences.

On Wednesday 13 June 2007, Sammy Kershaw announced his candidacy for Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana in the 20 October jungle primary.  The position was held by the incumbent Democrat, Mitch Landrieu.  Sammy Kershaw also faced a second Republican candidate, State Representative Gary Beard of Baton Rouge, an engineer first elected to the state House in a 2001 special election.  Sammy Kershaw finished second with 30% of the vote, but Mitch Landrieu won re-election with a majority on the first ballot.



In 2008, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'The Ultimate Collection' (Hump Head Country, 2008), which included the following tracks:

'Me & Maxine' (written by Gordon Bradberry and Michael Lunn) (No.35, 2000)
'When You Love Someone' (written by Keith Stegall and Dan Hill) (No.37, 1999)
'Maybe Not Tonight' (written by Keith Stegall and Dan Hill) (No.17, 1999) / this track, which was a duet with Lorrie Morgan, was promoted by both Mercury Records and BNA Records, and was also included on Lorrie Morgan's 'My Heart' (BNA Records, 1999)
'One Day Left to Live' (written by Dean Dillon, Randy Boudreaux and John Northrup) (No.35, 1999)
'Honky Tonk America' (written by Bob McDill) (No.31, 1998)
'Matches' (written by Skip Ewing and Roger Springer) (No.22, 1998)
'Love of My Life' (written by Keith Stegall and Ed Hill) (No.2, 1997)
'Politics, Religion & Her' (written by Byron Hill and Tony Martin) (No.28, 1997)
'Vidalia' (written by Tim Nichols and Mark D. Sanders) (No.10, 1996)
'Meant to Be' (written by Rick Bowles and Chris Waters) (No.5, 1996)
'Southbound' (written by Mac McAnally) (No.27, 1995)
'If You're Gonna Walk, I'm Gonna Crawl' (written by Larry Bastian and Buddy Cannon) (No.18, 1995)
'Third Rate Romance' (written by Russell Smith) (No.2, 1994)
'National Working Woman's Holiday' (written by James Dean Hicks, Roger Murrah and Pat Terry) (No.2, 1994)
'I Can't Reach Her Anymore' (written by Mark Petersen and Bruce Theien) (No.3, 1994)
'Queen of My Double-Wide Trailer', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.7, 1993)
'Haunted Heart', which was written by Buddy Brock and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016) (No.9, 1993)
'She Don't Know She's Beautiful' (written by Paul Harrison and Bob McDill) (No.1 for one week in April / May 1993)
'Anywhere but Here' (written by Buddy Cannon, Bob DiPiero and John Scott Sherrill) (No.10, 1992)
'Yard Sale' (written by Larry Bastian and Dewayne Blackwell) (No.17, 1992)
'Cadillac Style' (written by Mark C. Petersen) (No.3, late 1991 / early 1992)
'Don't Go Near The Water' (written by Chapin Hartford and Jim Foster) (No.12, 1992)

In late 2008, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of his first single in two years, 'Real People', as a non-album single, on Boomerville / Big Hit Records.  The single, however, failed to chart on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart.



On Saturday 6 February 2010, during a performance at Lafayette's Hub City Ford, Sammy Kershaw was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.



On Tuesday 31 August 2010, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Better Than I Used to Be' (Big Hit Records, 2010), which was produced by Buddy Cannon.  Two tracks were released as Billboard Hot Country Singles from the album: 'Better Than I Used to Be' (written by Ashley Gorley and Brian Simpson) and 'The Snow White Rows of Arlington' (written by Hugh Prestwood).  The album, along with the two singles, failed to enter a Billboard country music chart.

Sammy Kershaw's 'Better Than I Used to Be' (Big Hit Records, 2010) also included the following tracks:

'That Train' (written by Sammy Kershaw)
'Saltwater Cowboy' (written by Ron Harbin, Phil O'Donnell and Cyril Rawson)
'Everybody Wants My Girl' (written by Ed Hill and Billy Lawson)
'Through The Eyes of a Woman' (written by Ed Hill, Mark Irwin and Josh Kear)
'I Ain't Fallin' For That' (written by Buddy Cannon and Billy Yates)
'Like I Wasn't Even There' (written by Wes Hightower and Monty Criswell)
'The Cover of The Rolling Stone', which was written by Shel Silverstein (Thursday 25 September 1930 - Saturday 8 May 1999 / Sunday 9 May 1999) / this track featured guest vocals from Jamey Johnson
'I See Red' (written by Wil Nance, Dean Dillon and Buddy Brock)
'Takin' The Long Way Home' (written by Sammy Kershaw, John Scott Sherrill and Scotty Emerick)

Watching his home state, Louisiana, embroiled in the Gulf Oil Spill in April 2010, Sammy Kershaw, himself a Lafayette resident, became the official spokesperson for Protect Our Coastline, a non-profit organisation dedicated to providing relief to the fishermen and shrimpers affected most by the spill.



On Tuesday 28 May 2013, Sammy Kershaw, Joe Diffie and Aaron Tippin saw the release of 'All In The Same Boat' (Red Distribution Records, 2013), which included the following tracks:

'All in The Same Boat' (written by Jamey Johnson, Don Poythress and Wynn Varble)
'Kiss This' (written by Philip Douglas, Aaron Tippin and Thea Tippin)
'Heart of Gold' (written by Neil Young)
'She Don't Know She's Beautiful' (written by Paul Harrison and Bob McDill)
'The Way You Look Tonight' (written by Dorothy Fields and Jerome Kern)
'On & On' (written by Stephen Bishop)
'The Route That I Took' (written by Sammy Kershaw)
'I'm Hangin' On' (written by Joe Diffie and Steve Pippin)
'Misery Loves Country' (written by David Fraiser, Edward Hill and Josh Kerr)
'I Love to Work' (written by Bradley Gaskin, Sammy Kershaw and Billy Lawson)
'He Believed' (written by Aaron Tippin and Thea Tippin)
'Old Friends' (written by Jim Beavers and Ben Hayslip)

Sammy Kershaw: 'Do You Know Me? My Tribute to George Jones' (Big Hit Records, 2014)

On Tuesday 22 July 2014, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'Do You Know Me?: My Tribute to George Jones' (Big Hit Records, 2014), which included the following tracks:



'The Grand Tour', which was written by Norro Wilson, Carmol Taylor (Saturday 5 September 1931 - Friday 5 December 1986) and George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'The Grand Tour' (Epic Records, 1974); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August 1974



'Once You've Had The Best', which was written by Johnny Paycheck (Tuesday 31 May 1938 - Wednesday 19 February 2003) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'The Grand Tour' (Epic Records, 1974); the track reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in late 1973



'She Thinks I Still Care' (written by Dickey Lee and Steve Duffy) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'The New Favourites of George Jones' (United Artists Records, 1962); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for six weeks in 1962



'Why Baby Why' (written by Darrell Edwards and George Jones) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'The Grand Ole Opry's New Star' (Starday Records, 1956); the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in late 1955



'Walk Through This World with Me' (written by Sandra N. Seamons and Kaye Jeanne Savage)
/ the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'Walk Through This World with Me' (Musicor Records, 1967); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in early 1967



'When The Grass Grows Over Me', which was written by Don Chapel (1931 - Sunday 6 December 2015) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'I'll Share My World with You' (Musicor Records, 1969); the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1969



'Window Up Above' (written by George Jones) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) and included on 'George Jones Sings Country & Western Hits' (Mercury Records, 1961); the track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in late 1960



'White Lightning', which was written by J.P. Richardson (Friday 24 October 1930 - Tuesday 3 February 1959) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones and included on 'George Jones Sings White Lightning & Other Favourites' (Mercury Records, 1959); George Jones' version of 'White Lightning' was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in April / May 1959



'Near You', which was written by Francis Craig (10 September 1900 - Saturday 19 November 1966) and Kermit Goell (1915 - Thursday 4 December 1997) / this track featured guest vocals from Georgette Jones / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones & Tammy Wynette and was included on 'Golden Ring' (Epic Records, 1976); George Jones & Tammy Wynette's version of 'Near You' was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for two weeks in February 1977



'He Stopped Loving Her Today' (written by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones and was included on 'I Am What I Am' (Epic Records, 1980); George Jones' version of 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1980

 

'The Race is On' (written by Don Rollins) / the original version of this track, which was recorded by George Jones in June 1963, but not released until November 1964 on the album 'I Get Lonely in a Hurry' (United Artists Records, 1964), reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1965

'The Race is On' (written by Don Rollins) also reached No.96 on the Billboard pop music singles chart, a rarity for a George Jones single, prompting United Artists Records to capitalize on its success by making it the title of a 1965 album release, 'The Race is On' (United Artists records, 1965).



'Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes', which was written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) / the original version of this track was recorded by George Jones and was included on 'Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes' (Epic Records, 1985); George Jones' version of 'Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes' reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in mid-1985

'Do You Know Me?' (written by Billy Lawson and Johnny Holland) / this track was written by Billy Lawson and Johnny Holland, specially for George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013), to cut a few months before he passed away. George Jones never recorded the song.

'The Route That I Took (My tribute to George Jones)' (written by Sammy Kershaw)



On Tuesday 9 June 2015, Sammy Kershaw saw the release of 'I Won't Back Down' (Cleopatra Records, 2015), which included the following tracks:

'Take a Letter Maria'
'Lay Back Down'
'Grillin' & Chillin'
'Fixer Upper'
'Groove'
'I Won't Back Down'
'I Had to Give That Up Too'
'I Can't Wait to Waste a Little Time'
'Send in the Rodeo Clowns'
'Don't Move'
'Why You Wanna Do Me This Way'
'Let's Lay Here Forever'

• Visit Sammy Kershaw's Official Site at sammykershaw.com

CMP



Country Music People is Europe’s number one country music magazine.

Country Music People is the specialist expert on country music - past, present and future.

Hux Records



Since February 1998, England-based Hux Records have been specialists in releasing classic archive recordings.

Gene Watson Fan Site