• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2007, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of the Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Lee Ann Womack, which she submitted to this site on Wednesday 18 July 2007.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Lee Ann Womack who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.

Sean Brady would also like to express a heartfelt 'thank you' to Sarah Brosmer at Lytle Management in Nashville, without whose assistance this quote would not have been possible.



Lee Ann Womack
This quote was submitted on Wednesday 18 July 2007.

'In my Dad's eyes, I hadn't really made it in the music business until now.



I've sung with Gene Watson'.


Thank you, Lee Ann Womack, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Lee Ann Womack...



Lee Ann Womack was born on Friday 19 August 1966 in Jacksonville, Texas and is best-known for her old fashioned-styled country music songs.

From an early age, Lee Ann Womack was interested in country music; her father, who was a radio disc jockey, often took his daughter to work with him to help choose records to play on the air.

Lee Ann Womack was the second of two daughters, born to Anne and Aubrey Womack; her mother was a schoolteacher and her father was also a high school principal.  As a child, Lee Ann Womack studied the piano and later graduated from Jacksonville High School in 1984.

After graduating, Lee Ann Womack attended South Plains Junior College in Levelland, Texas.  The college was one of the first in the United States to offer country music degrees and soon Lee Ann Womack became a member of the college band, Country Caravan.

A year later, in 1985, Lee Ann Womack left the college and, after an agreement with her parents, she enrolled at Belmont University in Nashville, where she studied the commercial ways of the music business.

In Nashville, Lee Ann Womack interned at the A&R department of MCA Records.  Lee Ann Womack studied at the college until 1990, leaving the school a year before graduation.

It was while she was attending Belmont University that she met fellow musician / singer / song-writer Jason Sellers.

Lee Ann Womack and Jason Sellers married in 1990 and together they had one daughter; Aubrie Lee Sellers was born in 1991.

Lee Ann Womack spent a few years raising her daughter before re-entering the country music business in the mid 1990s.

In 1995, Lee Ann Womack began performing her music in song-writing demos and at showcase concerts.  At one of these showcase concerts, she was spotted by Tree Publishing, who signed her after listening to one of her original demo recordings.

In 1996, Lee Ann Womack and Jason Sellers divorced.



Ricky Skaggs recorded Lee Ann Womack's 'I Don't Remember Forgetting' (co-written with Billy Foster and Jason Sellers) and included the track on 'Life is a Journey' (Atlantic Records, 1997); the track featured background vocals from Lee Ann Womack.

Lee Ann Womack then decided to pursue a career as a country music artist and auditioned for MCA Records chairman, Bruce Hinton, who praised her talents.

Shortly afterwards, Lee Ann Womack accepted a contract from MCA Records' sister record company, Decca Nashville, in 1996.



On Tuesday 13 May 1997, Lee Ann Womack saw the release, on Decca Records, of 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), her self-titled debut album, which was produced by Mark Wright.

Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Never Again, Again' (written by Monty Holmes and Barbie Isham) (No.23, 1997)
'The Fool' (written by Marla Cannon-Goodman, Gene Ellsworth and Charlie Stefl) (No.2, 1997)
'You've Got to Talk to Me' (written by Jamie O'Hara) (No.2, 1998)
'Buckaroo' (written by Mark D. Sanders and Ed Hill) (No.27, 1998)

Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), also included the following tracks:

'A Man with 18 Wheels' (written by Bobby Carmichael and Leslie Satcher)
'Am I The Only Thing That You've Done Wrong' (written by Billy Joe Foster, Lee Ann Womack and Jason Sellers)
'Make Memories With Me' (written by Leslie Satcher and Danny Stegall) / this track was a duet with Mark Chesnutt
'Trouble's Here' (written by Jann Browne and Matt Barnes)
'Do You Feel For Me' (written by Tim Johnson)
'Montgomery to Memphis' (written by Billy Montana and Anne Reeves)
'Get Up in Jesus' Name' (written by Mike Curtis and Marty Raybon)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), included the following:

Mike Brignardello (bass guitar)
Tony Brown (piano on 'You've Got to Talk to Me')
Larry Byrom (acoustic guitar; electric guitar on 'Make Memories with Me')
Pat Flynn and Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Abe Manuel (accordion)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (piano, Wurlitzer electric piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Gary W. Smith (piano on 'Get up in Jesus' Name')
Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Lee Ann Womack (vocals)
Liana Manis, Gene Miller, John Wesley Ryles, Leslie Satcher, Lisa Silver, Ricky Skaggs, Sharon White Skaggs, Bergen White and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Nashville String Machine (strings, conducted by Carl Gorodetzky and arranged by Bergen White)

Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut album, 'Lee Ann Womack' (Decca Records, 1997), reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997, No.106 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1997, and No.1 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers Chart in 1997.

It was also in 1997 when Lee Ann Womack won major awards from the country music community; 'Top New Female Vocalist' Award from the Academy of Country Music (ACM) and 'Top Artist of the Year' from Billboard Magazine.

Lee Ann Womack was also nominated for the 'Horizon Award' by the Country Music Association (CMA).

In 1998, Decca Records Nashville decided to close its doors and, as a consequence, Lee Ann Womack moved to MCA Nashville Records the same year.



On Tuesday 22 September 1998, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'Some Things I Know' (MCA Records Nashville, 1998), which was produced by Mark Wright, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'A Little Past Little Rock' (written by Brett Jones, Tony Lane and Jess Brown) (No.2, 1998) / this track featured guest vocals from Jason Sellers
'I'll Think of a Reason Later' (written by Tony Martin and Tim Nichols) (No.2, 1998)
'(Now You See Me) Now You Don't' (written by Tony Lane, Brett Brown and David Lee) (No.12, 1999)
'Don't Tell Me' (written by Buddy Miller and Julie Miller) (No.56, 1999) / this track featured guest vocals from Buddy Miller and Julie Miller

Lee Ann Womack's 'Some Things I Know' (MCA Records Nashville, 1998) also included the following tracks:

'Some Things I Know' (written by Burton Collins and Sally Barris) / this track was a duet with Vince Gill
'I'd Rather Have What We Had' (written by Bobby Braddock) / this track was a duet with Joe Diffie
'The Man Who Made My Mama Cry' (written by Billy Lawson, Lee Ann Womack and Dale Dodson) / this track featured guest vocals from Buddy Miller and Julie Miller
'I Keep Forgetting' (written by Jamie O'Hara) / this track was a duet with Vince Gill
'If You're Ever Down in Dallas' (written by Lee Ann Womack and Jason Sellers)
'When The Wheels Are Coming Off', which was written by Wynn Varble, Randy Hardison (Saturday 11 March 1961 - Tuesday 4 June 2002) and Leslie Satcher / this track featured guest vocals from Ricky Skaggs and Sharon White
'The Preacher Won't Have to Lie' (written by Billy Montana and Steve Dean)

Lee Ann Womack's 'Some Things I Know' (MCA Records Nashville, 1998) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998, No.136 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1998, and No.5 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers Chart in 1998.

In January 1999, Lee Ann Womack's daughter, Anna Lise Liddell, was born.

It was also in 1999 when Lee Ann Womack won 'Favourite New Country Artist' from the American Music Awards.

In November 1999, Lee Ann Womack married record producer Frank Liddell.



On Tuesday 23 May 2000, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000), which was produced by Mark Wright and Frank Liddell, and had a totally different sound to her previous releases, using pop music elements instead of traditional country music.

Lee Ann Womack's 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000) included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'I Hope You Dance' (written by Mark D. Sanders and Tia Sillers) (No.1 for five weeks in July / August 2000) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Sons of the Desert, also reached No.14 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2000
'Ashes By Now' (written by Rodney Crowell) (No.4, 2000)
'Why They Call It Falling' (written by Don Schlitz and Roxie Dean) (No.13, 2001)
'Does My Ring Burn Your Finger' (written by Julie Miller and Buddy Miller) (No.23, 2001)

Lee Ann Womack's 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000) also included the following tracks:

'The Healing Kind' (written by Ronnie Bowman and Greg Luck)
'After I Fall' (written by Mark Wright, Bill Kenner and Ronnie Rogers)
'Stronger Than I Am' (written by Bobbie Cryner)
'I Know Why The River Runs' (written by Julie Miller)
'Thinkin' With My Heart Again' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer, Dean Dillon and Donny Kees)
'I Feel Like I'm Forgetting Something' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Wynn Varble and Jason Sellers)
'Lonely Too' (written by Bruce Robison)
'Lord, I Hope This Day is Good' (written by Dave Hanner)

The Japanese release of Lee Ann Womack's 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000), with the serial number UICC-1029, included two bonus tracks, 'I Hope You Dance (The Rawling Mix)' and 'The Man Who Made My Mama Cry'.

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000) included the following:

Sam Bacco (percussion)
Brett Beavers, Mark Fain, Michael Rhodes and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Richard Bennett (electric guitar, bouzouki)
Ronnie Bowman, Bekka Bramlett, Lisa Cochran, Tabitha Fair, Marabeth Jordan, Liana Manis, Buddy Miller, Gene Miller, Julie Miller, Kevin Montgomery, Jon Randall, Jason Sellers, Lisa Silver, Ricky Skaggs and Bergen White (background vocals)
Mark Casstevens (gut string guitar)
Chad Cromwell, Dave Dunsearth and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Rusty Danmyer (Dobro)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Pat Flynn, Joe Manual and Dan Tyminski (acoustic guitar)
Larry Franklin (fiddle, mandolin)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, Dobro, slide guitar)
Kenny Greenberg and Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
John Johnson (mandolin)
Steve Nathan (keyboards, Hammond B-3 organ, synthesizer)
Michael Omartian (accordion)
Jeff Roach (synthesizer, Wurlitzer electric piano)
Nashville String Machine (strings conducted and arranged by David Campbell)

Lee Ann Womack's 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000) sold 76,000 copies during its first week of release, reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2000, No.16 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2000, and No.4 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 2000.

Towards the end of 2000, 'I Hope You Dance' won the Country Music Association (CMA) 'Song of the Year' and 'Single of the Year' Awards.  With the pop music success of 'I Hope You Dance', Lee Ann Womack drew the attention of the magazines 'People' and 'Time', both of which praised the single.  The song later won awards in 2001 from the Grammy and Academy of Country Music Awards.

Lee Ann Womack's 'I Hope You Dance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2000) went on to sell three million copies in the United States of America.

 

In January 2002, Willie Nelson saw the release of 'The Great Divide' (Lost Highway Records, 2002).

One of the included tracks was 'Mendocino County Line' (written by Matt Serletic and Bernie Taupin), a duet with Lee Ann Womack, which reached No.22 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 2002; the track, which won a Grammy Award and a Country Music Association (CMA) Award in 2002, was subsequently included on Willie Nelson's 'Songs' (Lost Highway Records, 2005).



On Tuesday 20 August 2002, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (MCA Records Nashville, 2002), which was produced by Frank Liddell, Mike McCarthy, Matt Serletic, Lee Ann Womack and Mark Wright, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (written by Brett Beavers and Tom Douglas)
(No.20, 2002)
'Forever Everyday' (written by Devon O'Day and Kim Patton-Johnston) (No.37, 2002)

Lee Ann Womack's 'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (MCA Records Nashville, 2002) also included the following tracks:

'I Saw Your Light' (written by Gretchen Peters)
'When You Gonna Run To Me' (written by Monty Powell, Jimmie Lee Sloas and Anna Wilson)
'Talk To Me' (written by David Grissom and Kevin Hunter)
'Orphan Train' (written by Julie Miller)
'I Need You' (written by Julie Miller)
'You Should've Lied' (written by Angelo Petraglia and Matraca Berg)
'He'll Be Back', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010), Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Dale Dodson
'Surrender' (written by Sally Barris and Karyn Rochelle)
'Blame It On Me' (written by Bruce Robison)
'Closing This Memory Down' (written by Dave Loggins and John Bettis)
'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (written by Brett Beavers and Tom Douglas) / this is the international version of the track

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's 'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (MCA Records Nashville, 2002) included the following:

Lee Ann Womack (vocals)
Maxi Anderson, Lisa Cochran, Dan Colehour, Kim Fleming, Vicki Hampton, Bobby Huff, Marcus Hummon, Marabeth Jordan, Fleming McWilliams, Gene & Julie Miller, Bruce Robison, Chris Rodriguez, John Wesley Ryles, Keith Sewell, Lisa Silver, Harry Stinson, Oren Waters and Maxine Willard Waters (vocal backing)
Kenny Greenberg, David Grissom, Colin Linden, B. James Lowry, Heitor Teixera Pereira, Tim Pierce and Randy Scruggs (guitars)
Jay Joyce (guitars, programming)
Brent Rowan (guitars, Tiple)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Greg Leisz (Dobro, steel guitar and pedal steel guitars)
Aubrey Haynie and Gabe Witcher (fiddle)
Bryan Sutton (banjo, mandolin)
Mickey Raphael (harmonica)
Jim Cox, John Gilutin and Jeffrey Roach (keyboards)
Chuck Leavell (piano)
Steve Nathan (piano, organ, synthesizers)
Matt Rollings (piano, Hammond organ, Wurlitzer)
Spencer Campbell, Michael Rhodes and Leland Sklar (bass)
Kenny Aronoff, Shannon Forrest and Chris McHugh (drums)
Eric Darken and Brad Dutz (percussion)
Jeff Coffin, Jim Horn and Denis Solee (horns)
David Campbell, Kristin Wilkinson and D. Bergen White (string arrangements)
String Section (The Nashville String Machine): David & Monisa Angell, Janet Askey, Carl Gorodetsky, Connie Heard, Anthony LaMarchina, Lee Larrison, Robert Mason, Cate Myer, Lynn Peithmann, Pamela Sixfin, Elisabeth K. Small, Christian Teal, Alan Catherine Olmstead, Mary Katheryn & Gary VanOsdale, and Kristin Wilkinson

Lee Ann Womack's 'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (MCA Records Nashville, 2002) reached No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2002, and No.16 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2002.



On Tuesday 29 October 2002, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of a Christmas album, 'The Season for Romance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2002), which included the following tracks:

'The Season For Romance' (written by Phil Swann and Greg Barnhill)
'Baby, It's Cold Outside', which was written by Frank Henry Loesser (29 June 1910 - 28 July 1969) / this track was a duet with Harry Connick Junior
'Let It Snow' / 'Winter Wonderland' (written by Dick Smith, Felix Bernard, Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne)
'Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas' (written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane)
'Silent Night' (written by Franz Gruber and Joseph Mohr)
'White Christmas' (written by Irving Berlin)
'Forever Christmas Eve' (written by Phil Swann and Greg Barnhill)
'The Man With The Bag' (written by Dudley Brooks, Hal Stanley and Irving Taylor)
'The Christmas Song' (written by Mel Tormé and Robert Wells)
'What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?', which was written by Frank Henry Loesser (29 June 1910 - 28 July 1969)

Lee Ann Womack's Christmas album, 'The Season for Romance' (MCA Records Nashville, 2002) reached No.19 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2002, and No.19 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2002.

In early 2003, Lee Ann Womack gained a small recurring role on 'The District', a popular television police drama which aired on CBS, in the United States, the first episode aired on Saturday 7 October 2000 and the last episode aired on Saturday 1 May 2004.



On Tuesday 4 May 2004, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records Nashville, 2004), which included the following tracks:

'Never Again, Again' (written by Monty Holmes and Barbie Isham)
 (No.23, 1997)
'You've Got To Talk To Me' (written by Jamie O'Hara) (No.2, 1998)
'The Fool' (written by Marla Cannon-Goodman, Gene Ellsworth and Charlie Stefl) (No.2, 1997)
'A Little Past Little Rock' (written by Brett Jones, Tony Lane and Jess Brown) (No.2, 1998) / this track featured guest vocals from Jason Sellers
'(Now You See Me) Now You Don't' (written by Tony Lane, Brett Brown and David Lee) (No.12, 1999)
'I'll Think of a Reason Later' (written by Tony Martin and Tim Nichols) (No.2, 1998)
'I Hope You Dance' (written by Mark D. Sanders and Tia Sillers) (No.1 for five weeks in July / August 2000) / this track, which featured guest vocals from Sons of the Desert, also reached No.14 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2000
'Ashes By Now' (written by Rodney Crowell) (No.4, 2000)
'Why They Call it Falling' (written by Don Schlitz and Roxie Dean) (No.13, 2001)
'Something Worth Leaving Behind' (written by Brett Beavers and Tom Douglas) (No.20, 2002)
'Mendocino County Line' (written by Matt Serletic and Bernie Taupin) (No.22, 2002)/ this track was a duet with Willie Nelson
'Does My Ring Burn Your Finger' (written by Julie Miller and Buddy Miller) (No.23, 2001)
'The Wrong Girl' (written by Liz Rose annd Pat McLaughlin) (No.24, 2004) / this track was one of two new tracks
'Time For Me To Go' (written by Lee Ann Womack and Tommy Lee James) / this track was one of two new tracks

Lee Ann Womack's 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records Nashville, 2004) reached No.2 on the
Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.28 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2004.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Greatest Hits' (MCA Records Nashville, 2004) was re-issued, in 2005, as a dual disc, featuring a bonus DVD, and as a hybrid SACD.



On Tuesday 8 February 2005, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'There's More Where That Came From' (MCA Records Nashville, 2005), which was produced by Greg Droman and Byron Gallimore, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'I May Hate Myself in The Morning' (written by Odie Blackmon) (No.10, 2004) / this track, which featured Lee Ann Womack's ex-husband, Jason Sellers, on background vocals, won 'Single of the Year' at the Country Music Association (CMA) Awards in 2004
'He Oughta Know That By Now' (written by Clint Ingersoll and Jeremy Spillman) (No.22, 2005)
'Twenty Years & Two Husbands Ago' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dean Dillon and Dale Dodson) (No.32, 2005)

Lee Ann Womack's 'There's More Where That Came From' (MCA Records Nashville, 2005) also included the following tracks:

'There's More Where That Came From' (written by Chris Stapleton and Chris DuBois)
'One's a Couple' (written by Billy Lawson, Dale Dodson and John Northrup)
'The Last Time' (written by David Lee, Tony Lane and Chris DuBois)
'Happiness' (written by Kostas)
'When You Get to Me' (written by Bill Luther and Marv Green)
'Painless' (written by Bill Luther, Hillary Lindsey and Luke Laird)
'What I Miss About Heaven' (written by Marcus Hummon and Annie Roboff)
'Waiting For The Sun to Shine' (written by Sonny Throckmorton)
'Stubborn (Psalm 151)' (written by Don Schlitz and Brett James)
'Just Someone I Used to Know', which was written by Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's 'There's More Where That Came From' (MCA Records Nashville, 2005) included the following:

Shannon Forrest and Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Michael Rhodes and Glenn Worf (bass)
Steve Nathan and Jimmy Nichols (piano, Wurlitzer, organ)
Paul Franklin and Robby Turner (steel guitar)
Tom Bukovac, Mark Casstevens, Rusty Dannmeyer, David Grissom, Troy Lancaster, B. James Lowry, Brent Mason, Randy Scruggs and Bryan Sutton (guitars)
Kirk 'Jelly Roll' Johnson (harmonica)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Stuart Duncan and Aubrey Haynie (mandolin)
Lisa Cochran, Wes Hightower, Luke Laird, Bill Luther, Chris Rodriguez, Jason Sellers, Harry Stinson, Lee Ann Womack and Andrea Zonn (backing vocals)

Lee Ann Womack's 'There's More Where That Came From' (MCA Records Nashville, 2005) reached No.3 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2005, and No.12 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2005.

Lee Ann Womack's 'There's More Where That Came From' (MCA Nashville, 2005) was hailed by many people within the country music industry as 'a return to tradition' as it featured songs about drinking and cheating with a distinctive older country twang.  The album won the Country Music Association (CMA) Award for 'Album of the Year' in 2005.



George Strait recorded Lee Ann Womack's 'Good News, Bad News' (co-written with Dean Dillon and Dale Dodson) and included the track on 'Somewhere Down in Texas' (MCA Records Nashville, 2005); the track featured guest vocals from Lee Ann Womack.

In 2006, Lee Ann Womack announced plans for the release of her sixth album for MCA Records Nashville.  The lead single, 'Finding My Way Back Home' (written by Craig Wiseman and Chris Stapleton) was released in the late summer of 2006 and debuted at No.46 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart; the single later peaked at No.37.

As a consequence, the album release date for Lee Ann Womack's 'Finding My Way Back Home' on MCA Records Nashville was pushed back to 2007 as Lee Ann Womack had found more songs which she wanted to record.



On Tuesday 17 October 2006, Vince Gill saw the release of 'These Days' (MCA Records, 2006), a groundbreaking, four-CD set featuring forty-three new recordings of diverse musical stylings.  Each album in the set explored a different musical mood: traditional country music, ballads, contemporary, up-tempo music and acoustic / bluegrass music.

Vince Gill's 'These Days' (MCA Records, 2006) was released as a four-CD set as follows:

'Workin' On a Big Chill' (The Rockin' Record)
'Workin’ On a Big Chill'
'Love’s Standing'
'Cowboy Up' / this track featured guest vocals from Gretchen Wilson
'Sweet Thing'
'Bet It All On You'
'Nothin’ For a Broken Heart' / this track was a duet with Rodney Crowell
'Son of a Ramblin’ Man' / the track featured guest vocals from The Del McCoury Band
'Smilin’ Song' / this track featured guest vocals from Michael McDonald
'The Rhythm of The Pourin’ Rain' / this track featured guest vocals from Bekka Bramlett
'Nothin’ Left To Say'

'The Reason Why' (The Groovy Record)
'What You Don't Say' / this track featured guest vocals from LeAnn Rimes
'The Reason Why' / this track featured guest vocals from Alison Krauss
'The Rock of Your Love' / this track featured guest vocals from Bonnie Raitt
'What You Give Away' / this track featured guest vocals from Sheryl Crow
'Faint of Heart' / this track featured guest vocals from Diana Krall
'Time to Carry On' / this track featured guest vocals from Jenny Gill
'No Easy Way'
'This Memory of You' / this track featured guest vocals from Trisha Yearwood
'How Lonely Looks'
'Tell Me One More Time about Jesus' / this track featured guest vocals from Amy Grant
'Everything & Nothing' / this track featured guest vocals from Katrina Elam
'Which Way Will You Go'
'These Days'

'Some Things Never Get Old' (The Country & Western Record)
'This New Heartache'
'The Only Love'
'Out of My Mind' / this track featured guest vocals from Patty Loveless
'The Sight of Me Without You'
'I Can’t Let Go' / this track featured guest vocals from Alison Krauss and Dan Tyminski
'Don’t Pretend With Me'
'Some Things Never Get Old' / this track featured guest vocals from Emmylou Harris
'Sweet Little Corrina' / this track featured guest vocals from Phil Everly (Thursday 19 January 1939 - Friday 3 January 2014)
'If I Can Make Mississippi' / this track featured guest vocals from Lee Ann Womack
'Take This Country Back' / this track was a duet with John Anderson

'Little Brother' (The Acoustic Record)
'All Prayed Up'
'Cold Gray Light of Gone' / this track featured guest vocals from The Del McCoury Band
'A River Like You' / this track featured guest vocals from Jenny Gill
'Ace Up Your Pretty Sleeve'
'Molly Brown'
'Girl' / this track featured guest vocals from Rebecca Lynn Howard
'Give Me The Highway' / this track featured guest vocals from The Del McCoury Band
'Sweet Augusta Darling'
'Little Brother'
'Almost Home' / this track was duet with Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016)



On Tuesday 21 August 2007, Joe Nichols saw the release of 'Real Things' (Universal South Records, 2007).

One of the included tracks was 'If I Could Only Fly', which was written by Blaze Foley (Sunday 18 December 1949 - Wednesday 1 February 1989), which featured guest vocals from Lee Ann Womack.



On Tuesday 25 September 2007, Gene Watson saw the release of 'In a Perfect World' (Shanachie Records, 2007), which was considered to be one of the more important traditional country music album releases of 2007.

One of the included tracks was 'Today I Started Loving You Again', which was written by Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens (Tuesday 1 October 1929 - Monday 24 April 2006); the track featured harmony vocals from Lee Ann Womack.

In 2008, Lee Ann Womack announced plans for a new single, for the first time in three years, once again on MCA Records Nashville.

'Last Call' (written by Erin Enderlin and Shane McAnally) was released on Monday 30 June 2008 and served as the lead-off single from Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008), an album which was released on Tuesday 21 October 2008.

 

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) was issued as a vinyl LP at the time of its release, as well as on CD.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008), which was produced by Tony Brown, included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'Last Call' (written by Erin Enderlin and Shane McAnally) (No.14, 2008)
'Solitary Thinkin' (written by Waylon Payne) (No.39, June 2009)

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) also included the following tracks:

'Either Way' (written by Chris Stapleton, Kendall Marvel and Tim James)
'New Again' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dale Dodson and Casey Beathard)
'I Found It in You' (written by Nash, Michael T. Post and Whitney Duncan)
'Have You Seen That Girl' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dale Dodson and Dean Dillon)
'The Bees' (written by Natalie Hemby and Daniel Tashian) / this track featured background vocals from Keith Urban
'I Think I Know' (written by Tom Shapiro, Mark Nesler and Tony Martin)
'If These Walls Could Talk' (written by Lee Ann Womack and Dale Dodson)
'Everything But Quits' (written by Lee Ann Womack, Dale Dodson and Dean Dillon) / this track was a duet with George Strait
'The King of Broken Hearts' (written by Jim Lauderdale) / this track, which was originally recorded by George Strait, was included on the soundtrack of the film 'Pure Country' (MCA Records Nashville, 1993)
'The Story of My Life' (written by Hillary Lindsey, Brett James and Angelo Petraglia)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) included the following:

Perry Coleman, Melissa Hayes, Morgane Hayes, Wes Hightower, Kim Keyes, Aubrey Sellers, Jason Sellers, Judson Spence, Chris Stapleton, Keith Urban and Curtis Young (background vocals)
Eric Darken (percussion)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle, mandolin)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, Hammond B-3 organ)
Brent Mason (electric guitar, gut string guitar)
Greg Morrow (drums, bongos)
Steve Nathan (piano, Hammond organ, Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer, keyboards, synthesizer, synthesizer accordion)
Michael Rhodes (bass guitar, upright bass)
Randy Scruggs and Bryan Sutton (acoustic guitar)
Ilya Toshinsky (electric guitar)
Lee Ann Womack (lead and background vocals)
Bergen White (string arrangements)

On Monday 20 October 2008, in order to promote 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008), Lee Ann Womack previewed the album in Nashville, at Nashville's War Auditorium, where she sang nearly all of the songs on the album; Lee Ann Womack also previewed the album at The Jazz Lincoln Centre in New York City in September 2008.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) reached No.4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2008, and No.23 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2008.

Lee Ann Womack's 'Call Me Crazy' (MCA Records Nashville, 2008) was nominated for a Grammy Award for 'Best Country Album' in December 2009.

In November 2009, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of a non-album single, 'There is a God' (written by Chris DuBois and Ashley Gorley); the track reached No.32 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2009.



On Tuesday 15 November 2011, David Nail saw the release of 'The Sound of a Million Dreams' (MCA Records, 2011); one of the included tracks was 'Songs For Sale' (written by Scooter Carusoe and Billy Montana), which featured harmony vocals from Lee Ann Womack.



It was also in 2011 when Lee Ann Womack provided guest vocals on the track 'Travelin' Kind', which was included on Stoney LaRue's 'Velvet' (B Side Music Group, 2011); the album was produced by Lee Ann Womack's husband, Frank Liddell, and Mike McCarthy.

In August 2012, Lee Ann Womack parted ways with MCA Records Nashville.

In April 2014, Lee Ann Womack signed a recording contract with Sugar Hill Records.



On Tuesday 23 September 2014, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'The Way I'm Livin' (Sugar Hill Records, 2014), which was produced by Frank Liddell, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart:

'The Way I'm Livin' (written by Adam Wright) / this track was released as a single in 2014, but it did not chart
'Send It On Down' (written by Chris Knight and David Leone) / this track was released as a single in 2015, but it did not chart

Lee Ann Womack's 'The Way I'm Livin' (Sugar Hill Records, 2014) also included the following tracks:

'Prelude: Fly' (written by Brent Cobb and Reed Foehl)
'All His Saints' (written by Mindy Smith)
'Chances Are' (written by Hayes Carll)
'Don't Listen to the Wind' (written by Julie Miller)
'Same Kind of Different' (written by Natalie Hemby and Adam Hood)
'Out On The Weekend' (written by Neil Young)
'Nightwind' (written by Bruce Robison)
'Sleeping With The Devil' (written by Brennen Leigh)
'Not Forgotten You' (written by Bruce Robison)
'Tomorrow Night in Baltimore' (written by Kenny Price)
'When I Come Around' (written by Mando Saenz)

Personnel involved in the recording of Lee Ann Womack's 'The Way I'm Livin' (Sugar Hill Records, 2014) included the following:

Lee Ann Womack (vocals)
Matt Chamberlain (drums)
Duke Levine (electric guitar, acoustic guitar)
Mac McAnally (acoustic guitar, piano, B-3, Rhodes, keyboards, mandocello)
Glenn Worf (bass, upright bass)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Hank Singer (fiddle, mandolin)
Aubrey Haynie (fiddle)
Kenny Greenberg (additional electric guitars)
Mike Rojas (accordion)
Tom Hambridge (bass drum)
Chris Carmichael (strings)

Lee Ann Womack's 'The Way I'm Livin' (Sugar Hill Records, 2014) reached No.18 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2014, No.99 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 2014, and No.22 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2014.

Lee Ann Womack's 'The Way I'm Livin' (Sugar Hill Records, 2014) was recorded and mixed by Chuck Ainlay at Sound Stage Studios in Nashville.

Additional recording on Lee Ann Womack's 'The Way I'm Livin' (Sugar Hill Records, 2014) was undertaken by Brandon Schexnayder and Christian Best at Dogtown Studios in Nashville, and Monique Studios in Cork, Ireland.



On Tuesday 4 March 2014, David Nail saw the release of 'I'm a Fire' (MCA Records, 2014); one of the included tracks was 'Galveston' (written by Jimmy Layne Webb), which was a duet with Lee Ann Womack.



'Galveston' (written by Jimmy Layne Webb) was originally recorded by Glen Campbell (Wednesday 22 April 1936 - Tuesday 8 August 2017), who included the track on 'Galveston' (Capitol Records, 1969).

Glen Campbell's version of 'Galveston' (written by Jimmy Layne Webb) was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for three weeks in April / May 1969, No.4 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1969, and No.1 on the Billboard Easy Listening Chart in 1969.

Lee Ann Womack: 'The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone' (ATO Records, 2017)

On Friday 20 October 2017, Lee Ann Womack will see the release of 'The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone' (ATO Records, 2017), which was produced by Frank Liddell, and will include the following tracks:

'All The Trouble'
'The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone'
'He Called Me Baby'
'Hollywood'
'End of The End of The World'
'Bottom of The Barrel'
'Shine on Rainy Day'
'Mama Lost Her Smile'
'Wicked'
'Long Black Veil', which was written by Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006) and Danny Dill (Friday 19 September 1924 - Thursday 23 October 2008)
'Someone Else’s Heartache'
'Sunday'
'Talking Behind Your Back'
'Take The Devil Out of Me', which was written by George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)

• Visit Lee Ann Womack's Official Site at leeannwomack.com

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