• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers who were contacted during 2007 were most gracious with their time and words.  It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Janie Fricke, which she submitted to this site on Monday 27 August 2007.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Janie Fricke who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Janie Fricke and Gene Watson at Porterfield Country Music Festival in Marinette, Wisconsin on Sunday 20 June 2010

Janie Fricke
This quote was submitted on Monday 27 August 2007.

'The unique purity of Gene Watson's voice is amazing.

He is the best and one of my favourites.


I am proud to say I have shared the show stage with him many times!'

Thank you, Janie Fricke, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Janie Fricke...



Janie Fricke was born Janie Marie Fricke on Friday 19 December 1947 in Whitley, Indiana and learned piano and guitar as a child; her first vocal influences were folk artists Joan Baez and Judy Collins.

Despite growing up in a musical family and spending much of her childhood singing at home, school and church, Janie Fricke's parents encouraged her to continue her formal education for a 'respectable'" career.  While studying for her bachelor's degree in elementary education at Indiana University, Janie was a member of The Singing Hoosiers.

Responding to an audition posted on the bulletin board at practice, Janie Fricke was thrilled to get a job singing commercial jingles and station breaks (one of her most notable commercial jingles was for The Red Lobster Seafood restaurant chain, in which she sang their famous slogan, 'Red Lobster for the seafood lover in you'.

Still, Janie Fricke's parents insisted that she return to school to finish her degree, which she did.

After studying at the University of Indiana, Janie Fricke acquired a teaching degree in Memphis, where she started singing sessions.  After graduation, Janie moved to Los Angeles, back to Memphis, and finally to Nashville, in 1975, where she became one of the hottest session singers in Music City.

Janie Fricke sang jingles for Coors, Pizza Hut, American Airlines, 7-Up and Red Lobster, among others, but she also earned a reputation singing on records.

Once in Nashville, Janie Fricke became an in-demand background vocalist; she sang background vocals for other numerous artists at the time, including Crystal Gayle, Ronnie Milsap, Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 - Thursday 30 July 2015), Tanya Tucker, Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) and Eddie Rabbitt (Thursday 27 November 1941 - Thursday 7 May 1998).

In 1974, T.G. Sheppard found a song which would change his life forever.  His astute ability to pick a hit song and promote it had paid off for numerous artists, yet T.G. Sheppard kept thinking of his own musical aspirations.  He knew Bobby David's composition 'Devil in The Bottle' was destined to be a hit, yet had no success in pitching the tune.

After being turned down by eight record labels in eighteen months, T.G. Sheppard decided to cut the song himself.

Heading to Nashville, T.G. Sheppard was signed to Melodyland Records, a subsidiary record company of Motown Records, the mammoth R&B label which was trying to establish a presence in country music.



'Devil in The Bottle' (written by Bobby David) was included on T.G. Sheppard's self-titled album, 'T.G. Sheppard' (Melodyland Records, 1975); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in February 1975 and featured back-up vocals from Janie Fricke.



However, it was Janie Fricke's work as a background vocalist on several recordings by Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006) which first brought Janie Fricke to national attention in the Unted States.

Janie Fricke supplied uncredited background vocals to a number of Johnny Duncan's country music hit singles, including the following:

'Jo & The Cowboy'
(No.26, 1975)
'Thinkin' of a Rendezvous' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Bobby Braddock) (No.1 for two weeks in December 1976)
'It Couldn't Have Been Any Better', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016) (No.1 for one week in April 1977)
'Stranger' (written by Kris Kristofferson) (No.4, 1976)

Following the success of these recordings, Janie Fricke was finally rewarded when she was given equal billing with Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006) on his cover of Jay & The Americans' 'Come a Little Bit Closer' (No.4, 1978), in which she sang the song's chorus.

However, it was likely Janie Fricke's contribution to Johnny Duncan's 'Stranger' (written by Kris Kristofferson), which reached No.4 in 1976, that generated the most interest.  In that song, Janie Fricke sang the line, 'Shut out the light and lead me....'.

Listeners began to wonder who the mystery lady was singing those words in Johnny Duncan's song.  Because of this, Janie Fricke was able to gain a recording contract of her own from Columbia Records, where she remained for over ten years, beginning in 1977.



In July 1976, England Dan (Seals) (Sunday 8 February 1948 - Wednesday 25 March 2009) & John Ford Coley saw the release of 'Nights Are Forever' (Big Tree Records, 1976); one of the included tracks was 'I'd Really Love to See You Tonight' (written by Parker McGee), which reached No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1976, and No.1 on the Billboard Easy Listening Chart in 1976, and featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke.

Billboard ranked 'I'd Really Love to See You Tonight' (written by Parker McGee) as the No.21 song for 1976.

In 1977, Janie Fricke teamed up with The Heart City Band and her debut single that year, 'What're You Doing Tonight', reached No.21 on the Billboard country music singles chart.



In 1977, Charlie Rich (Wednesday 14 December 1932 - Tuesday 25 July 1995) saw the release of 'Take Me' (Epic Records, 1977); one of the included tracks was 'On My Knees' (written by Charlie Rich), which was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1978 and featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke.



On Friday 24 June 1977, Crystal Gayle saw the release of 'We Must Believe in Magic' (United Artists Records, 1977), which became Crystal Gayle's highest selling album, reaching No.2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1977, and No.12 on the Billboard pop music albums chart in 1977.

One of the included tracks on Crystal Gayle's 'We Must Believe in Magic' (United Artists Records, 1977) was 'Don't it Make My Brown Eyes Blue' (written by Richard Leigh).

'Don't it Make My Brown Eyes Blue' (written by Richard Leigh) was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in August / September 1977, and No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1977, becoming Crystal Gayle's biggest hit, and featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke, Marcia Routh, Pebble Daniel, Sandy Mason Theoret (1944 - Wednesday 1 April 2015) and Garth Fundis.

 Vern Gosdin: 'Till The End' (Elektra Records, 1977) / re-issued by Collectors' Choice Music in 2008

In July 1977, Vern Gosdin (Sunday 5 August 1934 - Tuesday 28 April 2009) saw the release of his debut album 'Till The End' (Elektra Records, 1977); one of the included tracks was 'Till The End' (written by Cathy Gosdin), which reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977 and featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke.



Gene Watson and Rhonda Vincent recorded 'Till The End' (written by Cathy Gosdin) and included the track on 'Your Money & My Good Looks' (Upper Management Music, 2011).

In 2008, Collectors' Choice Music re-issued Vern Gosdin's debut album, 'Till The End' (Elektra Records, 1977), with an essay from noted author Colin Escott.



In September 1977, Mel Tillis saw the release of 'Love's Troubled Waters' (MCA Records, 1977); one of the included tracks was 'I Got The Hoss' (written by Gerald House), which reached No.3 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977 and featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke.



On Monday 3 October 1977, RCA Victor Records released Elvis Presley's 'Elvis in Concert' (RCA Victor Records, 1977), a soundtrack album released in conjunction with the television special of the same name which featured some of the final performances of Elvis Presley (Tuesday 8 January 1935 - Tuesday 16 August 1977).

Videotaped and recorded over two days at concerts in Omaha on Sunday 19 June 1977 and Rapid City, South Dakota on Tuesday 21 June 1977, both the special and album were broadcast and released on Monday 3 October 1977.

The single, 'My Way' (written by Paul Anka) / 'America the Beautiful', which was written by Katharine Lee Bates (12 August 1859 - Thursday 28 March 1929) and Samuel Augustus Ward (28 December 1847 - 28 September 1903), was also released on Monday 3 October 1977, two months after Elvis Presley's death (Tuesday 16 August 1977).

'My Way' (written by Paul Anka), which featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke,  reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1977, and No.22 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 1977.



In May 1978, Janie Fricke saw the release of her debut album, 'Singer of Songs' (Columbia Records, 1978), which was produced by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'What're You Doing Tonight'
(No.21, 1977)
'Baby, It's You' (No.21, 1978)
'Please Help Me, I'm Falling', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair (No.12, 1978)



The original version of 'Please Help Me, I'm Falling', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair, was recorded by Hank Locklin (Friday 15 February 1918 - Sunday 8 March 2009) and was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for eleven weeks in 1960, and No.8 on the Billboard pop music singles chart in 1960; the song was the title track of Hank Locklin's second album 'Please Help Me, I'm Falling' (RCA Victor Records, 1960).

Janie Fricke's 'Singer of Songs' (Columbia Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'I Loved You All The Way'
'We Could Have Been The Closest of Friends'
'You Changed My Life in a Moment'
'No One's Ever Gonna Love You'
'I Believe in You'
'Weekend Friend'
'I Think I'm Fallin' in Love'



In August 1978, Gene Watson saw the release of 'Reflections' (Capitol Records, 1978); one of the included tracks was 'I Don't Know How to Tell Her (she don't love me anymore)' (written by B. Fischer and Sonny Throckmorton), which featured background vocals from Janie Fricke.



In October 1978, John Conlee saw the release of his debut album for ABC Records, 'Rose Colored Glasses' (ABC Records, 1978), which was originally released as ABC 1105 and re-issued as MCA-3281 and MCA-873; the album reached No.11 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1978.

'Rose Colored Glasses' (ABC Records, 1978), which was produced by Bud Logan, included John Conlee's first two Billboard No.1 country music hit singles:

'Lady Lay Down' (written by Don Cook and Rafe VanHoy)
(No.1 for one week in January 1979)
'Backside of Thirty' (written by John Conlee) (No.1 for one week in May 1979)

John Conlee's debut album album for ABC Records, 'Rose Colored Glasses' (ABC Records, 1978), also included the following tracks:

'I'll Be Easy' (written by John Conlee)
'She Loves My Troubles Away' which was written by Rayburn Anthony and Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004)
'Just Let It Slide', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999)
'Some Old California Memory', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Warren D. Robb
'Hold On' (written by John Conlee and Dick Kent)
'Something Special' (written by Dave Loggins)
'Let Your Love Fall Back on Me' (written by John Conlee)

Personnel involved in the recording of John Conlee's 'Rose Colored Glasses' (ABC Records, 1978) included the following:

Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums, percussion)
Joe Osborn (bass)
Ron Oates (keyboards)
John Propst (piano)
Steve 'Juke' Logan (saxophone)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Billy Sanford and Dale Sellers (guitars)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Lea Jane Berinati, Mary Fielder, Janie Fricke and Ginger Holladay (backing vocals)



In March 1979, Moe Bandy saw the release of 'It's a Cheating Situation' (Columbia Records, 1979); one of the included tracks was 'It's a Cheating Situation', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton, which reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1979 and featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke.



In March 1979, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Love Notes' (Columbia Records, 1979), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Playin' Hard to Get' (written by J. Thompson)
(No.22, 1978)
'I'll Love Away Your Troubles for Awhile', which was written by Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013) and Bob Morrison (No.14, 1979)
'Let's Try Again' (written by D. Steagall) (No.28, 1979)

Janie Fricke's 'Love Notes' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Somewhere to Come when it Rains', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'River Blue' (written by Janie Fricke)
'Let Me Love You Goodbye', which was written by S. Davis and Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015)
'Love is Worth it All' (written by A. Wilson and S. Bates)
'You're The One I Love' (written by S. Ferguson)
'Stirrin' Up Feelin's' (wrtten by Jerry Foster and Bill Rice)
'Got My Mojo Working' (written by P. Foster)



In August 1979, John Conlee saw the release of 'Forever' (MCA Records, 1979), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Before My Time'
 (No.2, 1979)
'Baby, You're Something', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016), Rafe VanHoy and Don Cook (No.7, 1980)

John Conlee's 'Forever' (MCA Records, 1979) also included 'You Never Cross My Mind', which was written by Deborah Allen.

John Conlee's 'Forever' (MCA Records, 1979), whcih reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1979, featured Janie Fricke on backing vocals.

During this time, in the late 1970s, American country music radio still failed to regularly play Janie Fricke's material and, because of this, most of Janie's other singles did not chart very high between 1978 and 1981.

Janie Fricke was also a special guest oo the Louise Mandrell special 'Diamonds, Gold & Platinum', among other television specials.



In November 1979, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'From the Heart' (Columbia Records, 1979), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'But Love Me'
(No.26, 1979)
'Pass Me By (if you're only passing through)' (written by Hillman Hall) (No.22, 1980)

Janie Fricke's 'From the Heart' (Columbia Records, 1979) also included the following tracks:

'Fallin' for You'
'My World Begins & Ends with You'
'Cool September'
'When I Fall in Love'
'Gonna Love Ya (till the cows come home)'
'Some Fools Don't Ever Learn'
'One Piece at a Time'
'This Ain't Tennessee & He Ain't You'



In February 1980, Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) saw the release of 'Heart & Soul' (MCA Records, 1980).  One of the included tracks was 'I'd Love to Lay You Down', which was written by Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in March / April 1980 and featured guest backing vocals from Janie Fricke.



In May 1980, John Conlee saw the release of 'Friday Night Blues' (MCA Records, 1980), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Friday Night Blues' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Rafe VanHoy) (No.2, 1980)
'She Can't Say That Anymore' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.2, 1980)
'What I Had with You', which was written by Curley Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Sonny Throckmorton (No.12, 1981)

John Conlee's 'Friday Night Blues' (MCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Honky Tonk Toys', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Judy Vowell
'Old Fashioned Love' (written by Don Cook and Jamie O'Hara)
'Misery Loves Company', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008)
'Let's Get Married Again' (written by Rory Bourke, Charlie Black and Jerry Gillespie)
'When I'm Out of You' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer and Sonny Throckmorton)
'We Belong in Love Tonight' (written by Mark Paden)
'Always True' (written by David Loggins)

John Conlee's 'Friday Night Blues' (MCA Records, 1980) reached No.16 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.

Personnel involved in the recording of John Conlee's 'Friday Night Blues' (MCA Records, 1980) included the following:

John Propst (piano)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums, percussion)
Steve 'Juke' Logan (saxophone)
Mark Casstevens (guitar)
Brent Rowan (guitar)
Joe Osborn (bass)
Buddy Emmons (Wednesday 27 January 1937 - Wednesday 29 July 2015) (steel guitar)
Mitch Humphries
Mark Paden
Tommy Williams
Lea Jane Berinati, Janie Fricke, Jackie Cusic and Todd Cerney (backing vocals)



In October 1980, Johnny Duncan (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006) & Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Nice 'n' Easy' (Columbia Records, 1980), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Come a Little Bit Closer'
(No.4, 1978)
'He's out of My Life' (No.17, 1980)

Johnny Duncan
 (Wednesday 5 October 1938 - Monday 14 August 2006) & Janie Fricke's 'Nice 'n' Easy' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Nice 'n' Easy'
'There's Nothing Stronger Than Our Love'
'Baby You've Got What it Takes'
'Lovin' Arms'
'It Couldn't Have Been Any Better', which was written by Ray Griff (Monday 22 April 1940 - Wednesday 9 March 2016) (No.1 for one week in April 1977)
'Atlanta Georgia Stray'
'Thinking of a Rendezvous' (written by Sonny Throckmorton and Bobby Braddock) (No.1 for two weeks in December 1976)
'Stranger' (written by Kris Kristofferson) (No.4, 1976)

In late 1980, Janie Fricke's producer, Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015), noticed Janie Fricke's limited success and realised the issue could be changed.  Billy Sherrill advised Janie to establish an identity by focusing on one style, and Janie Fricke began to record ballads.

As a result, Janie Fricke had a breakout year in 1981, when she landed two Billboard Top 5 country music hit singles with 'Down to My Last Broken Heart' (written by Chick Rains) (No.2, 1980) and 'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) (No.4, 1981).



It was producer Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) who produced Gene Watson's 'Honky Tonk Crazy' (Epic Records, 1987).



In November 1980, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me When I Cry' (Columbia Records, 1980), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Down to My Last Broken Heart' (written by Chick Rains)
(No.2, 1980)
'Pride' (written by Wayne Walker and Irene Stanton) (No.12, 1981) / this track reached No.1 on the RPM Country Tracks Chart in Canada in 1981
'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) (No.4, 1981)

Janie Fricke's 'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me When I Cry' (Columbia Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Enough of Each Other'
'Going Through The Motions'
'Cry'
'Every Time a Teardrop Falls'
'It's Raining Too'
'I Just Can't Fool My Heart'
'Blue Sky Shining'

Janie Fricke's 'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me When I Cry' (Columbia Records, 1980) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1980.



In September 1981, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Sleeping with Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1981), which was produced by Jim Ed Norman, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Do Me with Love' (written by John Schweers) (No.4, 1981)
'Don't Worry 'bout Me Baby' (written by Bruce Channel, Kieran Kane and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in July 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Ricky Skaggs

Janie Fricke's 'Sleeping with Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'Homeward Bound'
'Love Me'
'Sleeping with Your Memory'
'Heart'
'Always'
'If You Could See Me Now'
'There's no Future in the Past'
'Midnight Words'

Janie Fricke's 'Sleeping with Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1981) reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.

 

Following the release of 'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me When I Cry' (Columbia Records, 1980) and 'Sleeping with Your Memory' (Columbia Records, 1981), both of which were produced by Jim Ed Norman, Janie Fricke changed producers and enlisted the help of Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014), who was the father of Kevin Montgomery.



In September 1982, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'It Ain't Easy' (Columbia Records, 1982), which was produced by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'It Ain't Easy Bein' Easy', which was written by Shawna Harrington, Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016) and Les Taylor (No.1 for one week in November / December 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'You Don't Know Love' (written by Donald Alan 'Don' King and Beckie Foster) (No.4, Spring 1983) / this track was a duet with Bill Warren
'He's a Heartache (lookin' for a place to happen)', which was written by Jeff Silbar and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in August 1983) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Tell Me a Lie' (written by Barbara Myrick and Mickey Buckins) (No.1 for one week in December 1983) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman

Janie Fricke's 'It Ain't Easy' (Columbia Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'Who Better than an Angel' (written by Jeff Silbar, DuBois and Sam Lorber)
'Too Hard on My Heart' (written by Caneer, Johnson and Shelton)
'Little More Love' (written by Bruce Channel and Daily)
'Love Have Mercy' (written by Buckingham and Newton)
'Heart to Heart Talk' (written by Morrison, Reid and Slate)
'Tryin' to Fool a Fool' (written by John Schweers)

Janie Fricke's 'It Ain't Easy' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.15 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982 and became Janie Fricke's most successful-selling album.

On Monday 11 October 1982 (Gene Watson's 39th birthday), Janie Fricke was named as 'Female Vocalist of the Year' by the Country Music Association (CMA); she was also named 'Female Vocalist of the Year' by the Country Music Association (CMA) in 1983.



In October 1982, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982), which included the following tracks:

'Do Me with Love' (written by John Schweers) (No.4, 1981)
'Pass Me By (if you're only passing through)' (written by Hillman Hall) (No.22, 1980)
'Playin' Hard to Get' (No.22, 1978)
'But Love Me' (No.26, 1979)
'Down to My Last Broken Heart' (written by Chick Rains) (No.2, 1980)
'Don't Worry 'bout Me Baby' (written by Bruce Channel, Kieran Kane and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in July 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Ricky Skaggs
'What're You Doing Tonight' (No.21, 1977)
'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) (No.4, 1981)
'Please Help Me, I'm Falling', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair (No.12, 1978)
'I'll Love Away Your Troubles for Awhile', which was written by Johnny MacRae (1929 - Wednesday 3 July 2013) and Bob Morrison (No.14, 1979)

Janie Fricke's 'Greatest Hits' (Columbia Records, 1982) reached No.34 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1982.

In 1983, Janie Fricke toured with The Heart City Band, and with the group Alabama.



In October 1983, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Love Lies' (Columbia Records, 1983), which was produced by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Let's Stop Talkin' about It' (written by Rory Bourke, Rafe VanHoy and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1984)
'If The Fall Don't Get You', which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001), Dave Robbins and Sam Lorber (No.8, Summer 1984)

Janie Fricke's 'Love Lies' (Columbia Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'Have I Got a Heart'
'How Do You Fall Out of Love'
'Love Lies'
'Lonely People'
'Walkin' a Broken Heart'
'I've Had All The Love I Can Stand'
'Where's The Fire'

Janie Fricke's 'Love Lies' (Columbia Records, 1983) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1983.



In June 1984, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of 'It's All in The Game' (Epic Records, 1984), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Let's Chase Each Other Around The Room', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) and Sherill Rodgers (No.1 for one week in September 1984)
'A Place to Fall Apart' (written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) and Willie Nelson (No.1 for one week in February 1985) / this track was a duet with Janie Fricke
'Natural High', which was written by Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) (No.1 for one week in June 1985) / this track was a duet with Janie Fricke

Merle Haggard's 'It's All in The Game' (Epic Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'It's All in The Game' (written by Carl Sigman and Charles Dawes)
'Little Hotel Room', which was written by Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016)
'I Never Go Home Anymore', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'All I Want to do is Sing My Song', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) and Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016)
'Thank Heaven for Little Girls' (written by Alan Lenner and Frederick Loewe)
'To All The Girls I've Loved Before', which was written by Hal David (Wednesday 25 May 1921 - Saturday 1 September 2012) and Albert Hammond
'You Really Lose Your Mind', which was written by Ernest Tubb (Monday 9 February 1914 - Thursday 6 September 1984)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard's 'It's All In The Game' (Epic Records, 1984) included the following:

Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 - Tuesday 3 July 2001), Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001), Chet Atkins (Friday 20 June 1924 - Saturday 30 June 2001) and Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (steel guitar)
Tiny Moore (mandolin)
Mike Leech (bass)
Kenny Malone (drums)
Jim Belkin (fiddle)
Bobby Wood (piano, keyboards)
Don Markham (sax)
Janie Fricke (vocals)



In August 1984, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'First Word in Memory' (Columbia Records, 1984), which was produced by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Your Heart's Not in It' (written by Michael Garvin, Bucky Jones and Tom Shapiro) (No.1 for one week in December 1984)
'First Word in Memory is Me' (No.7, 1984)

Janie Fricke's 'First Word in Memory' (Columbia Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'Talkin' Tuff'
'One Way Ticket'
'First Time out of The Rain'
'Love Like Ours'
'In Between Heartaches'
'Another Man Like That'
'Without Each Other'
'Take it from the Top'

Janie Fricke's 'First Word in Memory' (Columbia Records, 1984) reached No.17 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1984.

It was also in 1984 when Janie Fricke tried her hand at acting when she had a guest-starring role on the Dukes of Hazzard, playing the part of Ginny, a criminal, who hid money in the dashboard of a getaway car which was to become the General Lee in the episode 'Happy Birthday, General Lee' (episode 131).



Janie Fricke was a guest duet partner on the track 'Who Cares', which was included on Ray Charles' 'Friendship' (Columbia Records, 1984); the album was re-issued by Columbia / Legacy Records in 2005.



In 1985, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Somebody Else's Fire' (Columbia Records, 1985), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'She's Single Again', which was written by Peter McCann and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.2, 1985)
'Somebody Else's Fire' (written by Pat Bunch, Pam Rose and Mary Ann Kennedy) (No.4, 1985)
'Easy to Please', which was written by Kent M. Robbins (Wednesday 23 April 1947 - Saturday 27 December 1997) and Rhonda Fleming (No.5, 1986)

Janie Fricke's 'Somebody Else's Fire' (Columbia Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

'I Hurt All Over'
'Don't Make Me a Liar Again'
'He Ain't You'
'My Heart's Hearin' Footsteps'
'What a Heart Won't Do'
'Party Shoes'
'Only Thing You Took Away'

Janie Fricke's 'Somebody Else's Fire' (Columbia Records, 1985) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.

It was also in 1985 when Janie Fricke established The Janie Fricke Scholarship at Indiana University to help benefit gifted students in The School of Music.  The scholarships were open to active members of The Singing Hoosiers vocal ensemble, who demonstrated financial need.



In March 1985, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) saw the release of 'Kern River' (Epic Records, 1985), which included one track, which was a hit on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Kern River', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) (No.10, 1985)

Merle Haggard's 'Kern River' (Epic Records, 1985) also included the following tracks:

'Old Flames Can't Hold a Candle to You' (written by Hugh Moffatt and Pebe Sebert)
'There I've Said it Again' (written by Redd Evans and Dave Mann)
'You Don't Love Me Anymore', which was written by Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016)
'Natural High', which was written by Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) (No.1 for one week in June 1985) / this track featured guest vocals from Janie Fricke
'Big Butter & Egg Man', which was written by Percy Venable and Louis Armstrong (Sunday 4 August 1901 - Tuesday 6 July 1971)
'Ridin' High', which was written by Freddy Powers (Tuesday 13 October 1931 - Tuesday 21 June 2016) and Dean Reynolds)
'There's Somebody Else on Your Mind', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'I Wonder Where I'll Find You at Tonight', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016)
'There Won't Be Another Now', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'Old Watermill' (written by B.H. Harris)

Personnel involved in the recording of Merle Haggard's 'Kern River' (Epic Records, 1985) included the following:

Roy Nichols (Friday 21 October 1932 - Tuesday 3 July 2001) and Grady Martin (Thursday 17 January 1929 - Monday 3 December 2001) (guitar)
Norman Hamlet (steel guitar, dobro)
Dennis Hromek (bass)
Biff Adam (drums)
Mark Yeary (piano, keyboards)
Tiny Moore (fiddle, mandolin)
Jim Belkin (fiddle)
Don Markham (sax, trumpet, horns)
Janie Fricke (vocals)



In 2011, Merle Haggard's 'Kern River' (Epic Records, 1985) was re-issued by BGO Records (7 St Andrews Street, North Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP33 1TZ, England), along with 'Amber Waves of Grain' (Epic Records, 1985), as a special 2-for-1 CD set.



In October 1985, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'The Very Best of Janie Fricke' (Columbia Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

'Ridin' High' / this track was newly recorded
'It Ain't Easy Bein' Easy', which was written by Shawna Harrington, Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016) and Les Taylor (No.1 for one week in November / December 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'He's a Heartache (lookin' for a place to happen)', which was written by Jeff Silbar and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in August 1983) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'You Don't Know Love' (written by Donald Alan 'Don' King and Beckie Foster) (No.4, Spring 1983) / this track was a duet with Bill Warren
'Let's Stop Talkin' about It' (written by Rory Bourke, Rafe VanHoy and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1984)
'First Word in Memory is Me' (No.7, 1984)
'Tell Me a Lie' (written by Barbara Myrick and Mickey Buckins) (No.1 for one week in December 1983) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'She's Single Again', which was written by Peter McCann and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.2, 1985)
'Your Heart's Not in It' (written by Michael Garvin, Bucky Jones and Tom Shapiro) (No.1 for one week in December 1984)
'If The Fall Don't Get You', which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001), Dave Robbins and Sam Lorber (No.8, Summer 1984)

Janie Fricke's 'The Very Best of Janie Fricke' (Columbia Records, 1985) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1985.



On Tuesday 9 June 2014, Janie Fricke's 'The Very Best of Janie Fricke' (Columbia Records, 1985) was re-issued by Morello Records, along with 'Saddle The Wind' (Columbia Records, 1988), as a special 2-for-1 CD set.

It was at this time, in 1985, when Janie Fricke expanded as an entrepreneur.  After making her own stage apparel as a hobby, Janie Fricke introduced a line of clothing and accessories in 1985.  By 1988, her fashions were reportedly carried in 200 to 300 stores in the United States.



In 1986, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'I Love Country' (Columbia Records, 1986), a compilation album, which included the following tracks:

'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) (No.4, 1981)
'Please Help Me, I'm Falling', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair (No.12, 1978)
'Pride' (written by Wayne Walker and Irene Stanton) (No.12, 1981) / this track also reached No.1 on the RPM Country Tracks Chart in Canada in 1981
'It Ain't Easy Bein' Easy', which was written by Shawna Harrington, Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016) and Les Taylor (No.1 for one week in November / December 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Let's Stop Talkin' about It' (written by Rory Bourke, Rafe VanHoy and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1984)
'But Love Me' (No.26, 1979)
'Down to My Last Broken Heart' (written by Chick Rains) (No.2, 1980)
'What're You Doing Tonight' (No.21, 1977)
'He's a Heartache (lookin' for a place to happen)', which was written by Jeff Silbar and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in August 1983) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Homeward Bound' / this was an album track from 1981
'Cry' / this was an album track from 1980
'Do Me with Love' (written by John Schweers) (No.4, 1981)
'Walkin' a Broken Heart' / this was an album track from 1983
'Always' / this was an album track from 1981
'Don't Worry 'bout Me Baby' (written by Bruce Channel, Kieran Kane and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in July 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Ricky Skaggs
'She's Single Again', which was written by Peter McCann and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.2, 1985)



In July 1986, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Black & White' (Columbia Records, 1986), which was produced by Norro Wilson, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Always Have, Always Will' (written by Johnny Mears) (No.1 for one week in October 1986)
'When a Woman Cries', which was written by Buck Moore and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 - Wednesday 16 November 2016) (No.20, 1986)

Janie Fricke's 'Black & White' (Columbia Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

'Till I can't take it Anymore'
'He's Breathing Down My Neck'
'Take Me a Little Vacation'
'Nothing Left to Say'
'Comin' Apart at the Seams'
'Don't Put it Past My Heart'
'He's Making a Love Story Short'
'I'd Take You Back Again'

Janie Fricke's 'Black & White' (Columbia Records, 1986) reached No.1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart on Saturday 4 October 1986, becoming Janie's only album to achieve that feat.

'Always Have, Always Will' (written by Johnny Mears) (No.1 for one week in October 1986) also produced a subtle change in the spelling of Janie Frickie's surname, which was originally spelled 'Fricke'.

Since she was constantly being called 'Frick' on a number of awards shows by everyone from Phil Collins to Charlie Daniels, Janie added the extra 'i' to her last name to alleviate the pronunciation problems, although she did revert to the original spelling a few years later.



In 1986, Janie Fricke, along with Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers Band, recorded 'From Time to Time (it feels like love again)'; the track was included on Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers Band's 'Changin' Partners' and reached No.21 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1987.



In April 1987, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'After Midnight' (Columbia Records, 1987), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Are You Satisfied' (No.32, 1987)
'Baby, You're Gone' (No.63, 1987)

Janie Fricke's 'After Midnight' (Columbia Records, 1987) also included the following tracks:

'I Hurt'
'I Don't Like Being Lonely'
'Teach Me How to Forget'
'If I Didn't Care'
'My Eternal Flame'
'Nobody Ever Loved Me so Good'
'From Time to Time'
'It Won't Be Easy'

Janie Fricke's 'After Midnight' (Columbia Records, 1987) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1987.

As neo-traditional country music artists began to become popular in 1987, including Patty Loveless and Randy Travis, the country-pop–styled music Janie Fricke had been recording since the early part of the decade was no longer in style on country music radio in the United States and, as a result, Janie Fricke's success began to decline.



In July 1988, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Saddle The Wind' (Columbia Records, 1988), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Where Does Love Go (when it's gone)' (written by Peter Rowan) (No.54, 1988)
'I'll Walk Before I'll Crawl' (written by Gidget Baird and Linda S. Buell) (No.50, 1988)
'Heart' (written by Don Schlitz and Paul Overstreet) (No.64, 1988)

Janie Fricke's 'Saddle The Wind' (Columbia Records, 1988) also included the following tracks:

'Sugar Moon', which was written by Bob Wills (Monday 6 March 1905 - Tuesday 13 May 1975) and Cindy Walker (Saturday 20 July 1918 - Thursday 23 March 2006)
'I'm Not That Good at Goodbye' (written by Don Williams and Bob McDill)
'Don't Touch Me', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010)
'If I were Only Her Tonight' (written by Bucky Jones, Bob McDill and Dickey Lee)
'The Healing Hands of Time' (written by Willie Nelson)
'Crazy Dreams' (written by Charles C. Beam, Charles L. Jiles and W.S. Stevenson)
'Saddle The Wind' (written by Steve Buckingham and Troy Seals)

Janie Fricke's 'Saddle The Wind' (Columbia Records, 1988) reached No.64 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1988.



On Tuesday 9 June 2014, Janie Fricke's 'Saddle The Wind' (Columbia Records, 1988) was re-issued by Morello Records, along with 'The Very Best of Janie Fricke' (Columbia Records, 1985), as a special 2-for-1 CD set.



In July 1989, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Labor of Love' (Columbia Records, 1989), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Love is One of Those Words', which was written by Holly Dunn (Thursday 22 August 1957 - Tuesday 15 November 2016), Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro (No.56, 1989)
'Give 'em My Number' (written by Dave Loggins) (No.43, 1989) / this track was Janie Fricke's last charted single on the Billboard country music singles chart

Janie Fricke's 'Labor of Love' (Columbia Records, 1989) also included the following tracks:

'What are You Doing Here with Me' (written by Bill Rice and Mary Sharon Rice)
'Last Thing That I Didn't Do' (written by Janie Fricke and Randy Jackson)
'Walking on The Moon' (written by Katy Moffatt and Tom Russell)
'Feeling is Believing' (written by Gary Nicholson, Pam Tillis and Kevin Welch)
'I Can't Help The Way I Don't Feel' (written by Michael Garvin, Tom Shapiro and Chris Waters)
'No Ordinary Memory' (written by Larry Shell and Jeffrey M. Tweel)
'One of Those Things' (written by Pam Tillis and Paul Overstreet)
'My Old Friend The Blues' (written by Steve Earle)

Janie Fricke's 'Labor of Love' (Columbia Records, 1989) reached No.64 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1989.

 

Following the release of Janie Fricke's highly acclaimed albums, 'Saddle The Wind' (Columbia Records, 1988) and 'Labor of Love' (Columbia Records, 1989), Janie Fricke and Columbia Records parted company.

In the early 1990s, Janie Fricke became a regular guest on The Statler Brothers' variety series, ''The Statler Brothers Show', which was broadcast on The Nashville Network (TNN), and was hosted by The Statler Brothers, along with Rex Allen Junior.

Janie Fricke: 'Crossroads: Hymns of Life' (Branson Records / Intersound Records, 1992)

On Saturday 15 August 1992, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Crossroads: Hymns of Faith' (Branson Records / Intersound Records, 1992), which was a collection of Gospel songs, and included the following:

'Ten Thousand Angels' (written by Ray Overholt)
'The Old Rugged Cross' (traditional)
'Take My Hand, Precious Lord' (written by Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey)
'Tears in Heaven' (written by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings)
'People Get Ready' (written by Curtis Mayfield)
'I Believe' (written by Ervin Drake, Irvin Graham, Jimmy Shirl and Al Stillman)
'Why Me Lord?' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Sweet Little Jesus Boy' (written by Robert MacGimsey)
'Elijah Rock' (traditional)
'Swing Low, Sweet Chariot' (traditional)
'Were You There?' (traditional)
'Amazing Grace' (written by John Newton and Bill Walker)

Janie Fricke: 'Now & Then' (Branson Records / Intersound Records, 1995)

On Tuesday 17 January 1995, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Now & Then' (Branson Records / Intersound Records, 1995), which included the following tracks:

'She's Single Again', which was written by Peter McCann and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.2, 1985)
'It Ain't Easy Bein' Easy', which was written by Shawna Harrington, Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016) and Les Taylor (No.1 for one week in November / December 1982) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'He's a Heartache (lookin' for a place to happen)', which was written by Jeff Silbar and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in August 1983) / this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Always Have, Always Will' (written by Johnny Mears) (No.1 for one week in October 1986)
'Your Heart's Not in It' (written by Michael Garvin, Bucky Jones and Tom Shapiro) (No.1 for one week in December 1984)
'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) (No.4, 1981)
'Do Me with Love' (written by John Schweers) (No.4, 1981)
'You Don't Know Love' (written by Donald Alan 'Don' King and Beckie Foster) (No.4, Spring 1983) / this track was a duet with Bill Warren
'Let's Try Again' (written by D. Steagall) (No.28, 1979)
'The First Word in Memory is Me' (written by Pat Bunch, Mary Ann Kennedy and Pamela Rose) (No.7, 1984)
'Somebody Else's Fire' (written by Pat Bunch, Pam Rose and Mary Ann Kennedy) (No.4, 1985)
'If The Fall Don't Get You', which was written by Van Stephenson (Wednesday 4 November 1953 - Sunday 8 April 2001), Dave Robbins and Sam Lorber (No.8, Summer 1984)
'Where's the Fire?' (written by Susan Longacre and Sam Lorber) / this track was an album track from 1983



In 2000, Janie Fricke mounted a comeback tour and saw the release, on Tuesday 10 October 2000, of 'Bouncin' Back' (JMF Records, 2000), which was released under Janie Fricke's own label, JMF Records; the album, which was sold exclusively at janiefricke.com, included the following tracks:

'If You Keep Building Fences'
'Quilt of Dreams'
'Bouncin' Back'
'Our Love's Worth Fighting For'
'In Here' (written by Craig Bickhardt and Jeff Pennig)
'Pick a Lane'
'It's Not Me'
'Tender Too Much'
'No Turning Back'
'Any Other Stone' (written by S. Brown)
'Love Forever More' (written by Janie Fricke)
'See-Saw Ride'



On Tuesday 2 April 2002, Janie Fricke saw the release of 'Live at Billy Bob's, Texas' (Smith Music Group, 2004), a 'live' concert set, which featured many of Janie Fricke's country music hit singles, including the following:

'Don't Worry 'bout Me Baby' (written by Bruce Channel, Kieran Kane and Deborah Allen)
 (No.1 for one week in July 1982) / the original version of this track featured background vocals from Ricky Skaggs
'Let's Stop Talkin' about It' (written by Rory Bourke, Rafe VanHoy and Deborah Allen) (No.1 for one week in March / April 1984)
'He's a Heartache (lookin' for a place to happen)', which was written by Jeff Silbar and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) (No.1 for one week in August 1983) / the original version of this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Any Other Stone' (written by S. Brown)
'She's Single Again', which was written by Peter McCann and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) (No.2, 1985)
'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) (No.4, 1981)
'Do Me with Love' (written by John Schweers) (No.4, 1981)
'Your Heart's Not in It' (written by Michael Garvin, Bucky Jones and Tom Shapiro) (No.1 for one week in December 1984)
'Somebody Else's Fire' (written by Pat Bunch, Pam Rose and Mary Ann Kennedy) (No.4, 1985)
'See-Saw Ride' (written by Craig Bickhardt)
'You Don't Know Love' (written by Donald Alan 'Don' King and Beckie Foster) (No.4, Spring 1983) / this track was a duet with Bill Warren
'Down to My Last Broken Heart' (written by Chick Rains) (No.2, 1980)
'Tell Me a Lie' (written by Barbara Myrick and Mickey Buckins) (No.1 for one week in December 1983) / the original version of this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Quilt of Dreams' (written by Craig Bickhardt and Tony Haselden)
'Bouncin' Back'
'It Ain't Easy Bein' Easy', which was written by Shawna Harrington, Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016) and Les Taylor (No.1 for one week in November / December 1982) / the original version of this track featured background vocals from Judy Rodman
'Love Forever More' (written by Janie Fricke)

At this time, Janie Fricke continued to tour extensively, but she set aside time to spend with her family on her Texas ranch near Lancaster.



On Tuesday 17 August 2004, Janie Fricke saw the release of a bluegrass album, 'The Bluegrass Sessions' (DM Records, 2004); as the title suggested, the album featured bluegrass versions of Janie Fricke's biggest hit singles from the 1980s:

Disc 1
'You Don't Know Love' (written by Donald Alan 'Don' King and Beckie Foster) / the original version of this track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in Spring 1983
'Goodbye Broken Heart'
'Do Me with Love' (written by John Schweers) / the original version of this track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981
'Faithless Love' (written by J.D. Souther)
'He's a Heartache (lookin' for a place to happen)', which was written by Jeff Silbar and Larry Henley (Wednesday 30 June 1937 - Thursday 18 December 2014) / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in August 1983
'Please Help Me, I'm Falling', which was written by Donald Irwin Robertson (Tuesday 5 December 1922 - Monday 16 March 2015) and Hal Blair / the original version of this track reached No.12 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978
'She's Single Again', which was written by Peter McCann and Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) / the original version of this track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1985
'I'll Need Someone to Hold Me (when I cry)' (written by Bob McDill and Wayland Holyfield) / the original version of this track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1981
'Down to My Last Broken Heart' (written by Chick Rains) / the original version of this track reached No.2 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1980
'Tell Me a Lie' (written by Barbara Myrick and Mickey Buckins) / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in December 1983)
'It Ain't Easy Bein' Easy', which was written by Shawna Harrington, Mark Eugene Gray (Friday 24 October 1952 - Friday 2 December 2016) and Les Taylor / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in November / December 1982
'Don't Worry 'bout Me Baby' (written by Bruce Channel, Kieran Kane and Deborah Allen) / the original version of this track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for one week in July 1982)
'Ring of Fire', which was written by June Carter Cash (Sunday 23 June 1929 - Thursday 15 May 2003) and Merle Kilgore (Thursday 9 August 1934 - Sunday 6 February 2005)

Disc 2
'You Don't Know Love' (written by Donald Alan 'Don' King and Beckie Foster) / the original version of this track reached No.4 in Spring 1983
'Interview with Janie Fricke'

In 2005, Janie Fricke attended the Country Music Association (CMA) Awards.

In May 2007, Janie Fricke was The Firefighters' Marshal for Winchester, Virginia's '80th Annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival'.

On Thursday 4 July 2013, Janie Fricke performed for five hours at the Independence Day festival in Slidell, Louisiana, to a crowd of over 8,000.

Janie Fricke Awards
1979
Music City News Country: 'Most Promising Female Artist of the Year'
1982
Country Music Association (CMA) Awards: 'Female Vocalist of the Year'
1983
Country Music Association (CMA) Awards: 'Female Vocalist of the Year'
Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards: 'Top Female Vocalist'
Music City News Country: 'Female Artist of the Year'
1984
Music City News Country: 'Female Artist of the Year'

Grammy Award Nominations
1978 'Best Female Country Vocal Performance' for 'What're You Doin' Tonight' (nominated)
1985 'Best Female Country Vocal Performance' for 'Your Heart's Not in It' (nominated)
1986 'Best Female Country Vocal Performance' for 'She's Single Again' (nominated)

• Visit Janie Fricke's Official Site at janiefricke.com

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