• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Webster PR



Webster Public Relations
, PO Box 23015, Nashville, TN 37202

Contact Scott Adkins
Telephone 615-777-6995



Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2006, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Ed Bruce, which he submitted to this site on Sunday 10 December 2006.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Ed Bruce who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Ed Bruce
This quote was submitted on Sunday 10 December 2006.

'Gene Watson is one of my long time, all-time favourites.

No smoke machines, no light shows!

Just pure, honest real country music'.

Thank you, Ed Bruce, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Ed Bruce...



Ed Bruce is a native of Keiser, Arkansas where he was born William Edwin 'Ed' Bruce Junior on Friday 29 December 1939, and was brought up in Memphis, Tennessee.

In 1957, when he was seventeen years old, Ed Bruce went to see Cowboy Jack Clement (Sunday 5 April 1931 - Thursday 8 August 2013), a legendary recording engineer for the legendary Sun Records label.

Ed Bruce caught the attention of Sun Records owner Sam Phillips, for whom he wrote and recorded 'Rock Boppin' Baby', under the name 'Edwin Bruce'.

Between 1957 and 1966, Ed Bruce saw the release of the following non-album singles, one of which charted on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Rockin' Boppin' Baby' (1957)
'Sweet Woman' (1958)
'Flight 303' (1961)
'It's Coming to Me' (1963)
'See The Big Man Cry' (1963)
'Don't Let It Happen' (1964)
'I'm Gonna Have a Party' (1964)
'He Gave Her to Me' (1964)
'Unbreakable Heart' (1966)

In 1962, Ed Bruce wrote 'Save Your Kisses' for pop music star Tommy Roe; the track was the 'B' side of Tommy Roe's hit single 'Sheila', which reached No.1 on the Billboard pop music singles chart.

In 1963, Ed Bruce reached No.109 on the Billboard 'Bubbling Under' Chart with his own recording of 'See The Big Man Cry'.

In the early 1960s, Ed Bruce recorded for RCA and some smaller record labels, including Wand / Scepter, singing rockabilly music, as well as more pop-oriented material, such as 'See The Big Man Cry'.

However, Ed Bruce didn't achieve significant success as a vocalist during this period.

However, Ed Bruce's career as a rockabilly performer was largely unsuccessful and, by 1964, he had moved to Nashville, where he became a member of The Marijohn Wilkins Singers.

Ed Bruce also entered into a lucrative career singing advertising jingles, his best-known campaign cast him as a character called 'The Tennessean'.



Dave Dudley (Thursday 3 May 1928 - Monday 22 December 2003) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Farmer's Prayer' and included the track on 'Songs About The Working Man' (Mercury Records, 1964).



Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) recorded Ed Bruce's 'See the Big Man Cry' and included the track on 'Less & Less / I Don't Love You Anymore' (Capitol Records, 1964); the track reached No.7 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1965.



On Monday 26 January 2009, England's Hux Records released Charlie Louvin's 'Less & Less / I Don't Love You Anymore and Lonesome is Me' (Hux Records, 2009) as a special 2-for-1 CD set (HUX 099).

In 1966, Ed Bruce returned to RCA Records and recorded 'Puzzles', 'The Price I Pay to Stay' and 'Lonesome is Me'.

Ed Bruce still did not achieve great chart action, but he made money recording voice-overs for television and radio commercials.



Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Lonesome is Me' and included the track on 'Lonesome is Me' (Capitol Records, 1966).

In March 1967, Ed Bruce saw the release of the non-album single, 'Last Train to Clarksville', which was written by Tommy Boyce (Friday 29 September 1939 - Wednesday 23 November 1994) and Bobby Hart; the track reached No.69 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1967.



'Last Train to Clarksville', which was written by Tommy Boyce (Friday 29 September 1939 - Wednesday 23 November 1994) and Bobby Hart, was the debut single by The Monkees and was released on Tuesday 16 August 1966; the track was later included on the group's self-titled album, 'The Monkees' (Colgems Records / RCA Records, 1966), which was released on Monday 10 October 1966.

The Monkees version of 'Last Train to Clarksville' was No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart on Saturday 5 November 1966; the track also reached No.23 on the United Kingdom Singles Chart in 1966.



In March 1968, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'If I Could Just Go Home' (RCA Victor Records, 1968), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included three tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Walker's Woods', which was written by Kay Arnold (Monday 14 June 1926 - Monday 24 October 2005)
 (No.57, 1966)
'If I Could Just Go Home' (written by Ed Bruce) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart
'Her Sweet Love & The Baby' (written by Ed Bruce) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart

Ed Bruce's 'If I Could Just Go Home' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) also included the following tracks:

'I Know Better' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Why Can't I Come Home' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Ninety-Seven More to Go' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Give More Than You Take' (written by Ed Bruce)
'By Route of New Orleans' (written by Sonny Moore)
'Shadows of Her Mind' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Lonesome is Me' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Price I Pay to Stay' (written by Ed Bruce)
'I'm Getting Better' (written by Ed Bruce)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'If I Could Just Go Home' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) includded the following:

Wayne Moss, Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008), Fred Carter (Sunday 31 December 1933 - Saturday 17 July 2010), Jack Eubanks, Ray Edenton and Jerry Shook (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014), Norbert Putman and Bobby Dyson (bass)
Jerry Carrigan (drums)
John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 - Monday 4 June 2001) (banjo)
Jerry Smith (piano)
Charlie McCoy and Onie Wheeler (harmonica)
Harold Cruthirds and Sadao Harada (cello)
Marvin Chantry and Gary Vanosdale (viola)
Brenton Banks, Kazuhide Isomura and Byron Williams (violin)
Louis Nunley of The Jordanaires (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Bergen White, Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006), Dorothy Ann Dillard,Glenn Baxter, Priscilla Mitchell Hubbard (Thursday 18 September 1941 - Wednesday 24 September 2014), Mary Greene and William Wright (vocals)

Ed Bruce's 'If I Could Just Go Home' (RCA Victor Records, 1968) reached No.44 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1968.

In 1968, Ed Bruce saw the release of the non-album single, 'Painted Girls & Wine', which reached No.52 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1968.



Jeannie Seely
recorded Ed Bruce's 'My Love Dies Hard' and included the track on 'Little Things' (Monument Records, 1968).



Jeannie C. Riley recorded Ed Bruce's 'Price I Pay to Stay' and included the track on 'Sock & Soul' (Little Darling Records, 1968).



In 1969, Ed Bruce signed a recording contract with Monument Records.

In July 1969, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Shades of Ed Bruce' (Monument Records, 1969), which was produced by Fred Foster, and included two tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Puzzles' (written by Sandy Nesse)
/ this track was released as a single in 1968, but it did not chart
'Everybody Wants to Get to Heaven' (written by Ed Bruce) (No.52, 1969)

Ed Bruce's 'Shades of Ed Bruce' (Monument Records, 1969) also included the following tracks:

'Song For Ginny' (written by Ed Bruce)
'When a Man Becomes a Man', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'Today is Mine', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008)
'I Couldn't Stay For Long' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Working Man's Prayer' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Are You Sincere' (written by Wayne P. Walker)
'You're a Bad Mistake I Made' (written by Ed Bruce)
'I Had No Reason For Leaving' (written by Ray Pennington)
'No Satisfaction Guaranteed' (written by Ray Pennington)
'Both Sides Now' (written by Joni Mitchell)



Billie Jo Spears (Friday 14 January 1938 - Wednesday 14 December 2011) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Price I Pay To Stay' and included the track on 'Mr. Walker, It's All Over' (Capitol Records, 1969).



Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Little Reasons' and included the track on 'Here's a Toast to Mama' (Capitol Records, 1970).

In 1973, Ed Bruce signed with United Artists Records and saw the release of several singles; only one single, released in 1974, became a minor Billboard country music hit.



In 1973, Ed Bruce saw the release of the non-album single, 'July, You're a Woman', which was written by John Stewart (Tuesday 5 September 1939 - Saturday 19 January 2008); the track reached No.77 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1973.

John Stewart (Tuesday 5 September 1939 - Saturday 19 January 2008) recorded 'July, You're a Woman' and included the track on 'California Bloodlines' (Capitol Records, 1969).



Tanya Tucker
recorded Ed Bruce's 'The Man That Turned My Mama On' and included the track on 'Would You Lay with Me (in a Field of Stone)' (Columbia Records, 1974); the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974.



In 1974, Crystal Gayle recorded Ed Bruce's 'Restless'; the track, which was a non-album single, reached No.39 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1974, and was subsequently included on Crystal Gayle's 'Country Classics' (Capitol Records, 1991).



Billie Jo Spears (Friday 14 January 1938 - Wednesday 14 December 2011) recorded Ed Bruce's 'I Can Only Judge Your Future By His Past' and included the track on 'Blanket On The Ground' (United Artists Records, 1975).



Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 - Wednesday 9 March 2005) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys' (co-written with Patsy Bruce) and included the track on 'Songbook of The American West' (ACS Records, 1976).



In 1976, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Ed Bruce' (United Artists Records, 1976), which was produced by Larry Butler, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Mammas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)
(No.15, 1975)
'Littlest Cowboy Rides Again' (written by Glenn Ray) (No.32, 1976)
'For Love's Own Sake' (No.36, 1976)
'Sleep All Mornin' (written by Alex Harvey) (No.57, 1976)

Ed Bruce's 'Ed Bruce' (United Artists Records, 1976) also included the following tracks:

'Mose Rankin' (written by Billy Edd Wheeler)
'Migrant' (written by Tony Joe White)
'Working Man's Prayer' (written by Ed Bruce)
'A Thing Called Love', which was written by Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008)
'Streets of Laredo' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)
'Cup of Conversation' (written by Jerry Oates)
'Just Along For The Ride' (written by Ronnie Scott)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Ed Bruce' (United Artists Records, 1976) included the following:

Jimmy Capps, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar, Dobro)
Tommy Allsup and Tommy Cogbill (bass)
Hayward Bishop (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins and Larry Butler (piano)
The Jordanaires and The Paul Richey Singers (vocals)



Kenny Rogers recorded Ed Bruce's 'You Gotta be Tired' (co-written with Larry Butler) and included the track on 'Love Lifted Me' (United Artists Records, 1976).



In 1977, Ed Bruce signed with Epic Records and saw the release of 'The Tennessean' (Epic Records, 1977), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 - Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Texas (When I Die)' (written by Ed Bruce, Bobby Borchers and Patsy Bruce)
(No.52, 1977)
'Star-Studded Nights' (written by Sonny Throckmorton) (No.54, 1977)
'Love Somebody To Death', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015) and Glenn Martin (No.57, 1978)
'Man Made of Glass' (written by Dennis Wilson) (No.94, 1978)

Ed Bruce's 'The Tennessean' (Epic Records, 1977) also included the following tracks:

'Never Take Candy From a Stranger' (written by Dennis Wilson)
'Am I Gonna Have to Burn Atlanta Down', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004)
'I Can't Seem to Get The Hang of Telling Her Goodbye' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Wedding Dress' (written by Ed Bruce and Roni Stoneman)
'I've Not Forgot Marie' (written by Ed Bruce)
'There Ain't No Good Chain Gang', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Hal Bynum

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'The Tennessean' (Epic Records, 1977) included the following:

Jimmy CappsDave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Mark Casstevens (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar, Dobro)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Tommy Cogbill (bass)
Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992), Eddie Bayers and Hayward Bishop (drums, percussion)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)



Waylon Jennings (Tuesday 15 June 1937 - Wednesday 13 February 2002) & Willie Nelson recorded Ed Bruce's 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow up to be Cowboys' (co-written with Patsy Bruce) and included the track on 'Waylon & Willie' (RCA Victor Records, 1978); the track was No.1 on the Billboard country music singles chart for four weeks in March / April 1978 and earned a Grammy Award.

 

Tanya Tucker
recorded Ed Bruce's 'Texas, When I Die' (co-written with Bobby Borchers and Patsy Bruce) and included the track on 'TNT' (MCA Records, 1978); the track reached No.5 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1978, and was also included on Michael Martin Murphey's 'Hard Country' (Epic Records, 1981), his first soundtrack album.



Billie Jo Spears (Thursday 14 January 1937 - Wednesday 14 December 2011) recorded Ed Bruce's 'All The Love I Have (I Give to You)' and included the track on 'Lonely Hearts Club' (United Artists Records, 1978).



In October 1978, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Cowboys & Dreamers' (Epic Records, 1978), which was produced by Buddy Killen (Sunday 13 November 1932 - Wednesday 1 November 2006), and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'The Man That Turned My Mama On' (written by Ed Bruce)
(No.70, 1978)
'Angeline (Would You Like to Dance Again)' (written by Ronnie Rogers) (No.60, 1978)

Ed Bruce's 'Cowboys & Dreamers' (Epic Records, 1978) also included the following tracks:

'I Really Didn't Have a Thing to Do Today' (written by Ed Bruce)
'The Greatest Love Song', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016) and Rafe Van Hoy
'Kentucky Boy, California Man' (written by Ronnie Rogers)
'The Family' (written by John Hurley and Ronnie Wilkins)
'Old Wore Out Cowboy' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'He Brings Your Memory Back Again' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Miracle Express', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004)
'Give My Old Memory a Call' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Cowboys & Dreamers' (Epic Records, 1978) included the following:

Jimmy CappsDave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004), Mark Casstevens and Pete Bordonali (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar, Dobro)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014) and Tommy Cogbill (bass)
Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992), Eddie Bayers and Hayward Bishop (drums)
Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (piano)



On Monday 27 April 2009, England's Hux Records released Ed Bruce's 'The Tennessean and Cowboys & Dreamers' (Hux Records, 2009) as a special '2-for-1' CD set (HUX106).

Wendel Adkins: 'Wendel Adkins: Live at Whiskey River' (Texas Music Records, 1979)

Wendel Adkins recorded Ed Bruce's 'Texas (When I Die)' (co-written with Bobby Borchers and Patsy Bruce) and included the track on 'Wendel Adkins: Live at Whiskey River' (Texas Music Records, 1979).

In 1980, Ed Bruce signed a recording contract with MCA Records, where he would score his biggest successes.



In May 1980, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Ed Bruce' (MCA Records, 1980), which was produced by Tommy West, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Diane' (written by Ronnie Rogers)
(No.21, 1980)
'The Last Cowboy Song' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.12, 1980) / this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson
'Girls, Women & Ladies' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1980)

Ed Bruce's 'Ed Bruce' (MCA Records, 1980) also included the following tracks:

'Last Thing She Said' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Red Doggin' Again' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers)
'Love Ain't Something I Can Do Alone' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Neon Fool' (written by Ronnie Rogers)
'Blue Umbrella' (written by John Prine)
'I Still Wish The Very Best For You', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992) and Brent Titcomb
'Outlaw & The Stranger' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Ed Bruce' (MCA Records, 1980) included the following:

Pete Bordonali and Jon Goin (guitar)
Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar, banjo)
Lloyd Green (steel guitar, Dobro)
Weldon Myrick (Monday 10 April 1939 - Monday 2 June 2014) (steel guitar)
Joe Allen and Jack Williams (bass)
Kenny Malone and Larrie Londin (Friday 15 October 1943 - Monday 24 August 1992) (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Shane Keister and Tommy West (piano, keyboards)
Jim Valentini, Frank Saulino, Carol Anderson, Mary Beth Anderson and Willie Nelson (vocals)



In March 1981, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'One to One' (MCA Records, 1981), which was produced by Tommy West, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Evil Angel', which was written by Jesse Winchester (Wednesday 17 May 1944 - Friday 11 April 2014)
(No.24, 1981)
'When You Fall in Love (Everything's a Waltz)' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1981)
'You're The Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Randy Hatch) (No.1 for one week in March 1982)
'Love's Found You & Me' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.13, 1982)

Ed Bruce's 'One to One' (MCA Records, 1981) also included the following tracks:

'It Just Makes Me Want You More', which was written by Jesse Winchester (Wednesday 17 May 1944 - Friday 11 April 2014)
'Hundred Dollar Lady', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011)
'I Take The Chance', which was written by Charlie Louvin (Thursday 7 July 1927 - Wednesday 26 January 2011) and Ira Louvin (Monday 21 April 1924 - Sunday 20 June 1965)
'No Regrets' (written by Tom Rush)
'Thirty-Nine & Holding' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Easy Temptations' (written by James Garrigus)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'One to One' (MCA Records, 1981) included the following:

Fred Newell, Pete Bordonalli, Jon Goin, Tommy West and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Joe Allen and Steve Shaffer (bass)
Kenny Malone and Bob Gelotte (drums, percussion)
Bill Kenner (mandolin)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Charles Cochran (Saturday 29 February 1936 - Thursday 7 June 2007) and Shane Keister (piano, keyboards)

Ed Bruce's 'One to One' (MCA Records, 1981) reached No.29 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1981.



Ed Bruce with 'Bret Maverick' co-stars Darleen Carr and James Garner (Saturday 7 April 1928 - Saturday 19 July 2014) in 1981

During 1981 and 1982, Ed Bruce began to act and do commercials.  One of his biggest acting roles was as the second lead on the television revival of 1957's 'Maverick', which was called 'Bret Maverick'.

Starring James Garner (Saturday 7 April 1928 - Saturday 19 July 2014) as a legendary western gambler, the series ran on NBC television during the 1981 - 1982 season, but was unexpectedly cancelled despite respectable ratings.

Ed Bruce played the irascibly surly town lawman, Tom Guthrie, who found himself reluctantly co-owning a saloon with Maverick, with whom he seemed to maintain a surreally adversarial relationship more or less throughout the entire season.

Ed Bruce also sang and wrote the theme song to the show, while James Garner (Saturday 7 April 1928 - Saturday 19 July 2014) sang the same song over the end titles at the show's close, albeit while being relentlessly interrupted by network announcements about upcoming programming.



In March 1982, Ed Bruce saw the release, in the United Kingdom, of 'Last Train to Clarksville' (RCA Records, 1982), which was produced by Bob Ferguson (Friday 30 December 1927 - Sunday 22 July 2001), and included the following tracks:

'I Know Better' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Why Can't I Come Home' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Walker's Woods', which was written by Kay Arnold (Monday 14 June 1926 - Monday 24 October 2005) (No.57, 1966)
'Ninety-Seven More to Go' (written by Ed Bruce)
'If I Could Just Go Home' (written by Ed Bruce) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart
'By Route of New Orleans' (written by Sonny Moore)
'Shadows of Her Mind' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Lonesome is Me' (written by Ed Bruce)
'I'm Getting Better' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Her Sweet Love & The Baby' (written by Ed Bruce) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart
'I'll Take You Away' (written by Marge Barton)
'Last Train to Clarksville', which was written by Tommy Boyce (Friday 29 September 1939 - Wednesday 23 November 1994) and Bobby Hart (No.69, 1967)
'I'd Best Be Leaving You' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Tiny Golden Locket' (written by Gloria Shayne)
'Ballad of The Drummer Boy' (written by Gary Oakes)
'Something Else to Mess Your Mind' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Puzzles' (written by Sandy Neese)
'Memphis Morning' (written by Roland Pike and Johnny Wilson)
'Painted Girls & Wine' (written by Jack Ripley) (No.52, 1968)
'Blue Bayou', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Joe Melson

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Last Train to Clarksville' (RCA Records, 1982), which was recorded between 1967 and1969 at RCA Victor Studio in Nashville, included the following:

Wayne Moss, Jerry Reed Hubbard (Saturday 20 March 1937 - Monday 1 September 2008), Fred Carter, Jack Eubanks, Ray Edenton and Jerry Shook (guitar)
Pete Drake (Saturday 8 October 1932 - Friday 29 July 1988) (steel guitar)
Henry Strzelecki (Tuesday 8 August 1939 - Monday 29 December 2014), Norbert Putnam and Bobby Dyson (bass)
Jerry Carrigan (drums)
John Hartford (Thursday 30 December 1937 - Monday 4 June 2001) (banjo)
Jerry Smith (piano)
Charlie McCoy (harmonica, trumpet, vibes)
Onie Wheeler (harmonica)
Harold E. Cruthirds and Sadao Harada (cello)
Marvin Chantry and Gary VanOsdale (viola)
Brenton Banks, Kazuhide Isomura and Byron Williams (violin)
Louis Nunley of The Jordanaires (Thursday 15 October 1931 - Friday 26 October 2012), Bergen White, Marijohn Wilkin (Wednesday 14 July 1920 - Saturday 28 October 2006), Dorothy Ann Dillard, Glenn Baxter, Priscilla Mitchell Hubbard (Thursday 18 September 1941 - Wednesday 24 September 2014), Mary Greene and William Wright (vocals)

Wendel Adkins: 'Wendel Adkins: Live at Gilley's' (Gilley's Records, 1982)

Wendel Adkins recorded Ed Bruce's 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys' (co-written with Patsy Bruce) re-titled as 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Cowboys Grow Up To Be Babies', and included the track on 'Wendel Adkins: Live at Gilley's' (Gilleys Records, 1982), which was recorded 'live' at Gilley's in Pasadena, Texas in 1982.



Nat Stuckey (Sunday 17 December 1933 - Wednesday 24 August 1988) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys' (co-written with Patsy Bruce) and included the track on 'Nat Stuckey' (51 West Records, 1982).

Ann M. Stuckey submitted a 'Peer's Quote' about Gene Watson on Saturday 25 January 2014



In October 1982, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'I Write it Down' (MCA Records, 1982), which was produced by Tommy West, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Ever Never Lovin' You' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Glenn Ray)
(No.4, 1982)
'My First Taste of Texas' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.6, 1982)

Ed Bruce's 'I Write it Down' (MCA Records, 1982) also included the following tracks:

'Somebody's Crying' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'One More Shot of Old Back Home Again' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)
'Songwriter (I Write It Down)' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Theme from Bret Maverick' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Glenn Ray)
'Memories Can't Stand to Be Alone' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Your Jukebox Could Use a Few More Sad Songs' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Babe in Arms' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
'Mammas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'I Write it Down' (MCA Records, 1982) included the following:

Steve Gibson, Pete Bordonali, Tom Johnson, Jon Goin and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Sonny Garrish and Lloyd Green (steel guitar, Dobro)
Joe Allen and Steve Schaffer (bass)
Kenny Malone and Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Bill Kenner (mandolin)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Shane Keister and Tommy West (piano, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Dennis Solee (horns)



In May 1983, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'You're Not Leaving Here Tonight' (MCA Records, 1983), which was produced by Tommy West, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You're Not Leaving Here Tonight' (written by Tommy Rocco, Charlie Black and Kerry Chater)
(No.21, 1983)
'If It Was Easy' (written by Larry Kingston and Harlan Sanders) (No.19, 1983)
'After All' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce) (No.4, 1983)

Ed Bruce's 'You're Not Leaving Here Tonight' (MCA Records, 1983) also included the following tracks:

'It Would Take a Fool' (written by Wayland Holyfield)
'In Mexico' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer)
'It's The Lovers (Who Give Love a Bad Name)' (written by Jay Johnson)
'Lucky Arms', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer
'You've Got Her Eyes' (written by Dickey Lee and Mark Sameth)
'I Think I'm in Love', which was written by Charlie Craig (Friday 30 September 1938 - Friday 1 July 2011) and Keith Stegall
'I'll Be There to Catch You' (written by Mitch Johnson and Robert Jones)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'You're Not Leaving Here Tonight' (MCA Records, 1983) included the following:

Pete Bordonalli, Tom Johnson, Jon Goin and Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Joe Allen and Steve Schaffer (bass)
Kenny Malone and James Stroud (drums)
Bill Kenner (mandolin)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Shane Keister and Tommy West (piano, keyboards)



In September 1984, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Tell 'Em I've Gone Crazy' (MCA Records, 1984), which was produced by Tommy West, and included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Tell 'Em I've Gone Crazy' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson)
(No.45, 1984)

Ed Bruce's 'Tell 'Em I've Gone Crazy' (MCA Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'If I Just Knew What to Say' (written by Stuart Wright)
'She Never Could Dance' (written by John Moffatt)
'It's All in Your Mind' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Straight Shooter' (written by Keith Stegall)
'Devil Inside' (written by Larry Bastian)
'Old Time's Sake' (written by Bobby Braddock)
'Birds of Paradise' (written by Baxter Black)
'Someone Who Would Care', which was written by Joe Allen, Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Jimmy Pasquale
'If She Just Helps Me Get Over You' (written by Bob McDill and Allen Reynolds)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Tell 'Em I've Gone Crazy' (MCA Records, 1984) included the following:

Steve Gibson, Pete Bordonalli, Tom Johnson, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) and Ray Edenton (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Joe Allen and Jack Williams (bass)
Kenny Malone and James Stroud (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Shane Keister, Ron Oates and Tommy West (piano, keyboards)
Denis Solee (horns)

When his recording career took off, Ed Bruce branched into acting, appearing in the CBS mini-series 'The Chisholms' and the television special 'The Last Days of Frank & Jessie James'.



In December 1984, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Homecoming' (RCA Victor Records, 1984), which was produced by Blake Mevis, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'You Turn Me On (Like a Radio)' (written by Bob McDill and Jim Weatherly)
(No.3, 1984)
'If it Ain't Love' (written by Mark Nesler) (No.20, 1985)
'When Givin' Up Was Easy', which was written by Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 - Thursday 13 June 1996) (No.17, 1985)

Ed Bruce's 'Homecoming' (RCA Victor Records, 1984) also included the following tracks:

'That's How It Goes (Until It's Gone)' (written by Bucky Jones and Martin Johnson)
'I Think I Could Love You (Better Than He Did)' (written by Bob Morrison and Debbie Hupp)
'Texas Girl, I'm Closing In On You' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Great Divide' (written by Gary Harrison and J.D. Martin)
'Migrant' (written by Tony Joe White)
'Old Loves Never Die', which was written by Dave Kirby (Sunday 10 July 1938 - Saturday 17 April 2004) and Warren D. Robb
'Forever Lovin' Me' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Homecoming' (RCA Victor Records, 1984) included the following:
Brent Rowan, Fred Newell, Randy Rich, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) and Chip Young (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar, Dobro)
Larry Paxton (bass)
Jerry Kroon (drums)
Buddy Spicher (fiddle)
Gary Prim (keyboards)



In March 1985, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Ed Bruce's Greatest Hits' (MCA Records, 1985), which included the following tracks:

'The Last Cowboy Song' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson)
 (No.12, 1980) / this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson
'Girls, Women & Ladies' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1980)
'When You Fall in Love (Everything's a Waltz)' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1981)
'You're The Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Randy Hatch) (No.1 for one week in March 1982)
'Love's Found You & Me' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.13, 1982)
'Ever Never Lovin' You' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Glenn Ray) (No.4, 1982)
'My First Taste of Texas' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.6, 1982)
'You're Not Leaving Here Tonight' (written by Tommy Rocco, Charlie Black and Kerry Chater) (No.21, 1983)
'If It Was Easy' (written by Larry Kingston and Harlan Sanders) (No.19, 1983)
'After All' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce) (No.4, 1983)



In August 1986, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Night Things' (RCA Victor Records, 1986), which was produced by Ed Bruce and T. Miller, and included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard country music singles chart:

'Nights' (written by Byron Hill and Tony Hiller)
(No.4, 1986)
'Fools For Each Other', which was written by Guy Clark (Thursday 6 November 1941 - Tuesday 17 May 2016) (No.49, 1986) / this track featured guest vocals from Lynn Anderson (Friday 26 September 1947 - Thursday 30 July 2015)
'Quietly Crazy', which was written by Steve Cropper and Mentor Williams (Tuesday 11 June 1946 - Wednesday 16 November 2016) (No.36, 1986)

Ed Bruce's 'Night Things' (RCA Victor Records, 1986) also included the following tracks:

'You Are a Rose' (written by Joe Allen and Mike Elliott)
'Fifteen to Forty Three', which was written by Don Goodman, Mark Sherrill and Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012)
'Fishin' in The Dark' (written by Wendy Waldman and Jim Photoglo)
'Somebody's Somebody New' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Down The Hall' (written by Troy Seals and Mike Reid)
'Memphis Roots' (written by Ed Bruce)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ed Bruce's 'Night Things' (RCA Victor Records, 1986) included the following:

Brent Rowan, Steve Cropper, Kenny Mims, Barry Chance, Bobby Thompson (Monday 5 July 1937 - Wednesday 18 May 2005) and Chip Young (guitar)
Sonny Garrish (steel guitar)
Joe Allen and Dick Dunn (bass)
Hayward Bishop and Jerry Kroon (drums)
Jonathan Yudkin (fiddle)
David Briggs, Bobby Wood, Mike Lawler and Gary Prim (piano, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Ace Cannon (sax)
Dave Bowling, Danny Dickerson, R.E. Hardaway, Liana Manis, Diane Tidwell, Brian Whittington and Curtis Young (vocals)

Following the release of 'Night Things' (RCA Victor Records, 1986), Ed Bruce made a conscious decision to cut back on his music in order to focus on his acting career; he subsequently appeared in several made-for-television films.

In the late 1980s, Ed Bruce hosted two shows, 'Truckin' USA' and 'American Sports Cavalcade', and also appeared in several theatrical releases, including 'Fire Down Below' with Steven Seagal.



Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 - Wednesday 9 March 2005) recorded Ed Bruce's 'Thank The Cowboy For The Ride' (co-written with Paul Richey) and included the track on 'Western Underground' (Capitol Records, 1991).



Chris LeDoux (Saturday 2 October 1948 - Wednesday 9 March 2005) recorded Ed Bruce's 'You Just Can't See Him From The Road' (co-written with Donny Blanz and Judith Bruce) and included the track on 'Whatcha Gonna Do With a Cowboy' (Liberty Records, 1992).



In February 1995, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'The Best of Ed Bruce' (Varese Sarabande Records, 1995), which included the following tracks:

'Mammas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)
 (No.15, 1975)
'Diane' (written by Ronnie Rogers) (No.21, 1980)
'The Last Cowboy Song' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.12, 1980) / this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson
'Girls, Women & Ladies' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1980)
'Evil Angel', which was written by Jesse Winchester (Wednesday 17 May 1944 - Friday 11 April 2014) (No.24, 1981)
'When You Fall in Love (Everything's a Waltz)' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1981)
'You're The Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Randy Hatch) (No.1 for one week in March 1982)
'Love's Found You & Me' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.13, 1982)
'Ever Never Lovin' You' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Glenn Ray) (No.4, 1982)
'My First Taste of Texas' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.6, 1982)
'Theme from Bret Maverick' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Glenn Ray) / this track was an album track from 1982
'You're Not Leaving Here Tonight' (written by Tommy Rocco, Charlie Black and Kerry Chater) (No.21, 1983)
'If It Was Easy' (written by Larry Kingston and Harlan Sanders) (No.19, 1983)
'After All' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce) (No.4, 1983)
'Tell 'Em I've Gone Crazy' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.45, 1984)
'You Turn Me On (Like a Radio)' (written by Bob McDill and Jim Weatherly) (No.3, 1984)
'When Givin' Up Was Easy', which was written by Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 - Thursday 13 June 1996) (No.17, 1985)
'Nights' (written by Byron Hill and Tony Hiller) (No.4, 1986)



In April 1995, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Puzzles' (Bear Family Records, 1995), which included the following tracks, all of which were recorded for RCA Records between 1966 and 1968:

'Puzzles' (written by Sandy Nesse) / this track was released as a single in 1968, but it did not chart
'Blue Denim Eyes'
'By Route of New Orleans' (written by Sonny Moore)
'Shadows of Her Mind' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Lonesome is Me' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Tiny Golden Locket' (written by Gloria Shayne)
'If I Could Just Go Home' (written by Ed Bruce) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart
'Walker's Woods', which was written by Kay Arnold (Monday 14 June 1926 - Monday 24 October 2005) (No.57, 1966)
'Give Me More Than You Take'
'I'm Getting Better' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Painted Girls & Wine'
'Price I Pay to Stay'
'Something Else to Mess Your Mind' (written by Ed Bruce)
'I Know Better' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Memphis Morning' (written by Roland Pike and Johnny Wilson)
'Blue Bayou', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Joe Melson
'Why Can't I Come Home' (written by Ed Bruce)
'Last Train to Clarksville', which was written by Tommy Boyce (Friday 29 September 1939 - Wednesday 23 November 1994) and Bobby Hart (No.69, 1967)
'Her Sweet Love & The Baby' (written by Ed Bruce) / this track was released as a single in 1967, but it did not chart
'I'll Take You Away' (written by Marge Barton)
'Ninety-Seven More to Go' (written by Ed Bruce)
'I'd Best be Leaving You'
'Puzzles' (written by Sandy Nesse) / this track was released as a single in 1968, but it did not chart
'Ballad of The Drummer Boy' (written by Gary Oakes)
'Painted Girls & Wine' (written by Jack Ripley) (No.52, 1968)
'Blue Bayou', which was written by Roy Orbison (Thursday 23 April 1936 - Tuesday 6 December 1988) and Joe Melson
'Give Me More Than You Take'
'I'd Best be Leaving You' (written by Kris Kristofferson)
'Puzzles' (written by Sandy Nesse) / this track was released as a single in 1968, but it did not chart



In 1997, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'Set Me Free' (Kingfisher Records, 1997), which included the following tracks:

'Set Me Free', which was written by Curly Putman (Thursday 20 November 1930 - Sunday 30 October 2016)
'Hallelujah, I Love Her So', which was written by Ray Charles (Tuesday 23 September 1930 - Thursday 10 June 2004)
'July the 12th 1939', which was written by Norro Wilson (Monday 4 April 1938 - Thursday 8 June 2017)
'She Even Woke Me Up to Say Goodbye', which was written by Mickey Newbury (Sunday 19 May 1940 - Sunday 29 September 2002) and Doug Gilmore
'Behind Closed Doors' (written by Kenny O'Dell)
'Another Place, Another Time' (written by Jerry Chesnut)
'King of The Road', which was written by Roger Miller (Thursday 2 January 1936 - Sunday 25 October 1992)
'No Money Down' (written by Chuck Berry)
'Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town' (written by Mel Tillis)
'Hoppy's Gone', which was written by Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015), Larry Henley and Johnny Slate



In 2002, Ed Bruce saw the release of 'This Old Hat' (Old Hat Records, 2002), which was produced by Mike Morgan and Jeff Elliott, and included the following tracks:

'Tracks You Left on Me' (written by Ed Bruce, Mike Morgan and Jeff Elliott)
'You're The Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Randy Hatch)
'How Do You Do That' (written by Ed Bruce and Donnie Blanz)
'Greatest Hit' (written by Ed Bruce and Jim McBride)
'This Old Hat' (written by Ed Bruce and Trey Bruce)
'One' (written by Ed Bruce, Ron Peterson and Judith Bruce)
'Feel of Bein' Gone' (written by Mike Morgan and Jeff Elliott)
'Bartender (It's All on The Jukebox)' (written by Ed Bruce and Glenn McGuirt)
'Truth is I'm a Liar' (written by Mike Morgan and Jeff Elliott)
'Did He Say It Better Than Me' (written by Ed Bruce and Dee Moeller)
'My First Taste of Texas' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers)
'Growing Up' (written by Ed Bruce and Phil O'Donnell)
'My Baby Don't Need No Polish to Shine' (written by Ed Bruce)



In April 2003, Ed Bruce saw the release of '12 Classics' (Varese Sarabande Records, 2003), which included the following tracks:

'Mammas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce)
 (No.15, 1975)
'The Last Cowboy Song' (written by Ed Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.12, 1980) / this track featured guest vocals from Willie Nelson
'Girls, Women & Ladies' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1980)
'When You Fall in Love (Everything's a Waltz)' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Ron Peterson) (No.14, 1981)
'You're the Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had' (written by Wayland Holyfield and Randy Hatch) (No.1 for one week in March 1982)
'Ever Never Lovin' You' (written by Ed Bruce, Patsy Bruce and Glenn Ray) (No.4, 1982)
'My First Taste of Texas' (written by Ed Bruce and Ronnie Rogers) (No.6, 1982)
'After All' (written by Ed Bruce and Patsy Bruce) (No.4, 1983)
'You Turn Me On (Like a Radio)' (written by Bob McDill and Jim Weatherly) (No.3, 1984)
'Nights' (written by Byron Hill and Tony Hiller) (No.4, 1986)
'In The Garden' (written by Austin Miles) / this track was previously unreleased
'Lord's Prayer' (written by Albert Mallotte and Arnold Strals) / this track was previously unreleased



Ed Bruce's son, Trey Bruce, is a songwriter and record producer.

• Visit Ed Bruce's Official Site at edbrucemusic.com

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