• The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson: 'Real Country Music' (Fourteen Carat Music, 2016)

  • Gene Watson: 'Back in the Fire & At Last' (Morello Records, 2016) / this album was officially released on Friday 11 November 2016

  • Gene Watson's Calendar

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson Guitars by Summey

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

  • Gene Watson at The Opry in Nashville

  • The Original Gene Watson Fan Site

Management


Lytle Management Group
P.O. Box 128228
Nashville, TN 37212
Contact Sarah Brosmer
Telephone 615-770-2688

Bookings



Battle Artist Agency
8887 Horton Highway,
College Grove, TN
Contact Rob Battle
office: 615-368-7433
mobile: 615-957-3444

Adkins Publicity

Exclusive PR / Publicity Representation of Gene Watson / Contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville

For exclusive PR / publicity representation of Gene Watson, contact Scott Adkins at Adkins Publicity in Nashville.

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Gene Watson's Peers within the country music industry believe in the sheer talent of this unassuming man from east Texas, so much so that Gene is regarded by many of them as 'the singer's singer' - and rightly so!

All of Gene Watson's Peers, who were contacted by The Gene Watson Fan Site, during 2004, were most gracious with their time and words.

It is here, within this special part of The Gene Watson Fan Site, that you have an opportunity to read a quote from Joe Diffie, which he submitted to this site on Monday 27 September 2004.

Sean Brady would like to take this opportunity to say 'thank you' to Joe Diffie who has made a special contribution to a unique part of this online 'celebration of a Lone Star Hero'.



Joe Diffie
This quote was submitted on Monday 27 September 2004.

'I've always been a fan of Gene's.



'Farewell Party', which was written by Lawton Williams (Monday 24 July 1922 - Thursday 26 July 2007), is one of the best country songs ever recorded!


I remember meeting Gene for the first time at a little convenience store in Nashville.

He was very gracious and complimentary of my music.


What a thrill!

In my mind, he's one of the most under-appreciated singers in the business'.

Thank you, Joe Diffie, for your support of Gene Watson.

About Joe Diffie...



Joe Diffie was born Joe Logan Diffie on Sunday 28 December 1958 and was raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma in a musical family.

Joe Diffie's first musical performance came at the age of four, when he performed in his aunt's country music band.

Joe Diffie's father, Joe R., played guitar and banjo, and his mother sang.  Following in his mother's footsteps, Joe Diffie began to sing at an early age, often listening to the albums in his father's record collection.  Joe Diffie has said that his 'Mom & Dad claimed I could sing harmony when I was three years old'.

When he was in the fourth grade, Joe Diffie's family moved to San Antonio in Texas and subsequently to Washington State where he attended fourth and fifth grades.

Later, Joe Diffie moved to Wisconsin for the years he was in sixth grade through his second year of high school, and back to Oklahoma where he attended high school in the town of Velma.

In his last two years in high school, Joe Diffie played football, baseball and golf in addition to running track; in his senior year he was recognised as Best All-Around Male Athlete.

Following graduating, Joe Diffie attended Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma.

Although he initially earned credits toward medical school, Joe Diffie decided against a medical profession after marrying for the first time in 1977, and ultimately dropped out before graduation.

Joe Diffie first worked in oil fields, then drove a truck which pumped cement out of oil wells in Alice, Texas, before he moved back to Duncan in Oklahoma to work in a foundry.  During this period, Joe Diffie worked as a musician on the side, first in a gospel group called Higher Purpose, and then in a bluegrass band called Special Edition.

Joe Diffie then built a recording studio, began touring with Special Edition in adjacent states, and sent demo recordings to publishers in Nashville.

After the foundry closed in 1986, Joe Diffie declared bankruptcy and sold the studio out of financial necessity.

Joe Diffie also divorced his wife, who left with their two children.  Joe Diffie spent several months in a state of depression before deciding to move to Nashville.

Once in Nashville, Joe Diffie took a job at Gibson Guitar Corporation.  While at Gibson, Joe Diffie contacted a songwriter and recorded more demos, including songs which would later be recorded by Ricky Van Shelton, Billy Dean, Alabama and The Forester Sisters.

Hank Thompson: 'Here's to Country Music' (Step One Records, 1988)

Hank Thompson (Thursday 3 September 1925 - Tuesday 6 November 2007) recorded Joe Diffie's 'Love's on The Rocks' (co-written with Bob O'Hair) and included the track on 'Here's to Country Music' (Step One Records, 1988).

It was also at this time when Randy Travis placed one of Joe Diffie's songs on hold but ultimately did not record it.

By mid-1989, Joe Diffie quit working at the company in order to record demos full-time.  Joe Diffie also met Debbie, who would later become his second wife.  That same year, Joe Diffie was contacted by Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014), a songwriter and record producer, who was known for his work with Buddy Holly (Monday 7 September 1936 - Tuesday 3 February 1959).

Bob Montgomery (Wednesday 12 May 1937 - Thursday 4 December 2014), who was then vice president of A&R at Epic Records, said that he wanted to sign Joe Diffie to a contract with the label, but had to put the singer on hold for a year.

Holly Dunn: 'The Blue Rose of Texas' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989)

In the meantime, Holly Dunn (Thursday 22 August 1957 - Tuesday 15 November 2016) saw the release of the single 'There Goes My Heart Again' (written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry); the track, which featured Joe Diffie on backing vocals, was included on Holly Dunn's 'The Blue Rose of Texas' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989) and reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 1989.

Following the success of Holly Dunn's single 'There Goes My Heart Again' (written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry), Joe Diffie signed a recording with Epic Records in early 1990.



On Friday 7 September 1990, Joe Diffie saw the release of his debut album, 'A Thousand Winding Roads' (Epic Records, 1990), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Home' (written by Fred Lehner and Andy Spooner) (No.1 for one week in November 1990) / this track reached No.1 on all three major country music format charts which were in existence at the time - Billboard, Radio & Records (now known as Mediabase 24/7) and the now-defunct Gavin Report - marking the first time in chart history that a country singer's debut single had done so / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart in 1990
'If You Want Me To' (written by Joe Diffie and Larry Williams) (No.2 in March 1991)
'If The Devil Danced (In Empty Pockets)', which was written by Ken Spooner and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016) (No.1 for week one week in June 1991)
'New Way (To Light Up An Old Flame)' (written by Joe Diffie and Lonnie Wilson) (No.2, 1991)

Joe Diffie's debut album, 'A Thousand Winding Roads' (Epic Records, 1990), also included the following tracks:

'There Goes the Neighborhood' (written by Bill C. Graham, Alan Laney and Tommy Dodson)
'Almost Home' (written by Larry Williams and Johnny Slate)
'I Ain't Leavin' 'Til She's Gone' (written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry)
'Coolest Fool in Town' (written by Randy Boudreaux)
'Liquid Heartache', which was written by Joe Diffie and Red Lane (Thursday 2 February 1939 - Wednesday 1 July 2015)
'Stranger in Your Eyes', which was written by Joe Chambers, Max D. Barnes (Friday 24 July 1936 - Sunday 11 January 2004) and Larry Jenkins

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's debut album, 'A Thousand Winding Roads' (Epic Records, 1990), included the following:

Mike Chapman and Dave Pomeroy (bass guitar)
Walt Cunningham (synthesizer)
Joe Diffie (lead vocals, background vocals)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar, Dobro)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Bill Hullett (acoustic guitar)
Brent Mason and Tim Menzies (electric guitar)
Johnny Neel (background vocals)
Ron Oates and Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Mike Severs (mandolin, acoustic guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, background vocals)

Joe Diffie's debut album, 'A Thousand Winding Roads' (Epic Records, 1990), reached No.23 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1990.

In late 1990, Joe Diffie performed his first concerts, touring with George Strait and Steve Wariner.  It was also in 1990 when Cash Box Magazine named Joe Diffie 'Male Vocalist of the Year'.



Shane Barmby
recorded Joe Diffie's 'This Tear's On Me' (co-written with Tommy Folk) and included the track on 'Jukebox Symphony' (Mercury Records, 1990).



Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 - Thursday 13 June 1996) recorded Joe Diffie's 'Memory Lane' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'Keith Palmer' (Epic Records, 1991).



Keith Palmer (Sunday 23 June 1957 - Thursday 13 June 1996) recorded Joe Diffie's 'Livin' on What's Left of Your Love' (co-written with Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer) and included the track on 'Keith Palmer' (Epic Records, 1991).



On Tuesday 13 August 1991, Doug Stone saw the release of 'I Thought It Was You' (Epic Records, 1991); the album included Joe Diffie's 'Burning Down The Town' (co-written with Wayne Perry).



On Tuesday 14 January 1992, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Regular Joe' (Epic Records, 1992), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Is It Cold in Here', which was written by Joe Diffie, Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012) and Kerry Kurt Phillips
 (No.5 in February 1992)
'Ships That Don't Come In' (written by Paul Nelson and Dave Gibson) (No.5 in July 1992) / this track also reached No.1 on Radio & Records Chart in the United States in 1992
'Next Thing Smokin', which was written by Joe Diffie, Danny Morrison (Sunday 22 April 1945 - Tuesday 14 February 2012) and Johnny Slate (No.16 in October 1992)
'Startin' Over Blues' (written by Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer and Lonnie Wilson) (No.41, 1992)

Joe Diffie's 'Regular Joe' (Epic Records, 1992) also included the following tracks:

'I Just Don't Know' (written by Lonnie Wilson and Michael Higgins)
'Ain't That Bad Enough' (written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Ron Moore)
'Just a Regular Joe' (written by Howard Perdew, Joe Diffie and Michael Higgins)
'Back to Back Heartaches' (written by Andy Spooner, Randy Boudreaux and Kerry Kurt Phillips)
'You Made Me What I Am' (written by Tim Menzies and Gary Harrison)
'Goodnight Sweetheart', which was written by Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)), L. David Lewis and Randy Boudreaux

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's 'Regular Joe' (Epic records, 1992) included the following:

Mike Chapman and Dave Pomeroy (bass guitar)
Joe Diffie (lead and background vocals)
Jerry Douglas (Dobro)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Vince Gill (background vocals)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Bill Hullett and Tim Menzies (acoustic guitar)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, background vocals)

Joe Diffie's 'Regular Joe' (Epic Records, 1992) reached No.22 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1992, No.132 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1992, and No.25 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1992.



On Tuesday 30 June 1992, Mary Chapin Carpenter saw the release of her highly acclaimed 'Come On, Come On' (Columbia Records, 1992), which included 'Not Too Much To Ask', a duet with Joe Diffie; the track reached No.15 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1993 and earned the duo a Grammy Award nomination for 'Best Country Collaboration with Vocals' at the 35th Grammy Awards in 1993.



On Tuesday 27 October 1992, George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013) saw the release of 'Walls Can Fall' (MCA Nashville Records, 1992).

One of the included tracks was 'I Don't Need Your Rockin' Chair', which was written by Billy Yates, Frank Dycus (Tuesday 5 December 1939 - Friday 23 November 2012) and Kerry Kurt Phillips; the track featured guest vocals from Alan Jackson, T. Graham Brown, Pam Tillis, Patty Loveless, Mark Chesnutt, Travis Tritt, Vince Gill, Clint Black and Garth Brooks, and won the Country Music Association (CMA) Award for 'Vocal Event of the Year'.



Conway Twitty (Friday 1 September 1933 - Saturday 5 June 1993) recorded Joe Diffie's 'I'm The Only Thing (I'll Hold Against You)', which was co-written with Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016) and Lonnie Wilson, and included the track on 'Final Touches' (MCA Records, 1993).



Tim McGraw recorded Joe Diffie's 'Memory Lane' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'Tim McGraw' (Curb Records, 1993).



Tim McGraw recorded Joe Diffie's 'Tears in The Rain' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry) and included the track on 'Tim McGraw' (Curb Records, 1993).



Clinton Gregory
recorded Joe Diffie's 'Surrender' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson and Kent Blazy) and included the track on 'Master of Illusion' (Step One Records, 1993).



Benny Berry recorded Joe Diffie's 'Maybe, Maybe Not' (co-written with Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer and Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'When The Trains Still Ran Through Dixie' (Hawk Records, 1993).



On Tuesday 20 April 1993, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Honky Tonk Attitude' (Epic Records, 1993), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Honky Tonk Attitude' (written by Joe Diffie and Lee Bogan)
(No.5 in March 1993)
'Prop Me Up Beside The Jukebox (If I Die)' (written by Howard Perdew, Rick Blaylock and Kerry Kurt Phillips) (No.3 in August 1993)
'John Deere Green', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.5 in December 1993)
'In My Own Backyard' (written by Joe Diffie, Kerry Kurt Phillips and Andy Spooner) (No.19 in March 1994)

Joe Diffie's 'Honky Tonk Attitude' (Epic Records, 1993) also included the following tracks:

'I'm Not Through Losin' You' (written by Joe Diffie, Chris Waters and Lonnie Wilson)
'If I Had Any Pride Left at All' (written by Troy Seals, Eddie Setser and John Greenbaum)
'I Can Walk The Line (If It Ain't Too Straight)' (written by Randy Boudreaux and Kerry Kurt Phillips)
'Somewhere Under The Rainbow' (written by Scott Blackwell, Jerry Laseter and Kerry Kurt Phillips)
'Here Comes That Train' (written by David L. Lewis)
'And That Was The Easy Part', which was written by Wendell Mobley and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001)
'Cold Budweiser & a Sweet 'Tater' (written by Teddy Gentry, Ronnie Rogers and Greg Fowler)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's 'Honky Tonk Attitude' (Epic Records, 1993) included the following:

Kenny Bell and Bill Hullett (acoustic guitar)
Lee Bogan, Yvonne Hodges, Carl Jackson, Pierce Jackson, Kim Morrison, John Wesley Ryles and Hurshel Wayne Wiginton (Saturday 29 January 1938 - Monday 6 March 2017) (background vocals)
Bruce C. Bouton, Paul Franklin and John Hughey (Wednesday 27 December 1933 - Sunday 18 November 2007) (steel guitar)
Walt Cunningham and Matt Rollings (keyboards)
Joe Diffie (lead vocals, background vocals)
Stuart Duncan and Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Jim Hoke (saxophone)
Brent Mason and Kenny Mims (electric guitar)
Tim Menzies (acoustic guitar, background vocals)
Larry Paxton and Dave Pomeroy (bass guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums)
'The Epic Proportion Choir' (additional background vocals on 'Prop Me Up Beside the Jukebox')

Joe Diffie's 'Honky Tonk Attitude' (Epic Records, 1993) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1993 and No.67 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart the same year.

It was also in 1993 when Joe Diffie was inducted as a member into The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville.



On Tuesday 26 July 1994, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Third Rock From The Sun' (Epic Records, 1994), which included five tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Third Rock From The Sun' (written by Sterling Whipple, Tony Martin and John Greenebaum)
(No.1 for one week in September / October 1994)
'Pickup Man' (written by Howard Perdew and Kerry Kurt Phillips) (No.1 for four weeks in December 1994 / January 1995)
'So Help Me Girl' (written by Howard Perdew and Andy Spooner) (No.2 in February 1995)
'I'm in Love With a Capital 'U' (written by Paul Nelson and Craig Wiseman) (No.21 in June 1995)
'That Road Not Taken' (written by Casey Kelly and Deborah Beasley) (No.40, 1995)

Joe Diffie's 'Third Rock From The Sun' (Epic Records, 1994) also included the following tracks:

'Wild Blue Yonder' (written by Stacey Slate and Michael Higgins)
'I'd Like to Have a Problem Like That' (written by Sterling Whipple, Tony Martin and John Greenebaum)
'Junior's in Love', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'From Here On Out' (written by Howard Perdew, Carol Perdew and Monica Stiles)
'Good Brown Gravy' (written by Billy Dean, Verlon Thompson and Bill Kenner)
'The Cows Came Home' (written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Lee Bogan)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's 'Third Rock from The Sun' (Epic Records, 1994) included the following:

Lee Bogan, Craig 'Flash' Fletcher, Clay Keith and Larry Keith (background vocals)
Walt Cunningham (keyboards, strings, special effects)
John Dickson and Johnny Slate (cow sounds on 'The Cows Came Home')
Joe Diffie (lead and background vocals, cow sounds)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Tim Menzies and Billy Joe Walker Junior (Friday 29 February 1952 - Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Larry Paxton and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
Matt Rollings (piano)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)

Joe Diffie's 'Third Rock From The Sun' (Epic Records, 1994) reached No.6 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1994, No.53 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1994, and No.9 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1994.



Tracy Lawrence recorded Joe Diffie's 'I Got a Feeling' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'I See It Now' (Atlantic Records, 1994).



Charley Pride
recorded Joe Diffie's 'Burnin' Down The Town' (co-written with Wayne Parry and Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'My 6 Latest & 6 Greatest' (Honest Entertainment Records, 1994).



David Parmley, Scott Vestal & Continental Divide recorded Joe Diffie's 'I Got a Feeling' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'David Parmley, Scott Vestal & Continental Divide' (Pinecastle Records, 1995).

 

On Tuesday 18 April 1995, Ty Herndon saw the release of his debut album, 'What Mattered Most' (Epic Records, 1995), which included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'What Mattered Most' (written by Gary Burr and Vince Melamed)
 (No.1 for one week in May 1995) / this track won 'Song of the Year' at the annual 'Music Row' Magazine Awards and Ty Herndon was named 'Best New Artist' at the 1995 Country Radio Music Awards
'I Want My Goodbye Back' (written by Pat Bunch, Doug Johnson and Dave Berg) (No.7, 1995)
'Heart Half Empty' (written by Gary Burr and Desmond Child) (No.21, 1995) / this track, which was a duet with Stephanie Bentley, was also included on Stephanie Bentley's 'Hopechest' (Epic Records, 1996)
'In Your Face' (written by Annette Cotter and Kim Tribble) (No.63, 1996)

Ty Herndon
's debut album, 'What Mattered Most' (Epic Records, 1995), also included the following tracks:

'Pretty Good Thing' (written by Walt Aldridge and Brad Crisler)
'Summer Was a Bummer', which was written by Hank Cochran (Friday 2 August 1935 - Thursday 15 July 2010) and Dean Dillon
'You Don't Mess Around With Jim', which was written by Jim Croce (Sunday 10 January 1943 - Thursday 20 September 1973)
'You Just Get One' (written by Vince Gill and Don Schlitz)
'Love At 90 Miles An Hour' (written by Chris Knight, Sam Tate and Annie Tate)
'Hat Full of Rain' (written by Kim Morrison and Ronnie Godfrey)

Personnel involved in the recording of Ty Herndon's debut album, 'What Mattered Most' (Epic Records, 1995), included the following:

Stephanie Bentley (duet vocals, background vocals)
Gary Burr, Carol Chase, Joe Diffie, Vince Gill, Mike Jones and Patty Loveless (background vocals)
John Catchings, David Davidson, Connie Ellisor, Jim Grosjean, Connie Heard, Kathryn Plumber, Christian Teal and Kristin Wilkinson (strings)
Joe Chemay (bass guitar)
Dan Dugmore (steel guitar)
Paul Franklin (Dobro, steel guitar)
Rob Hajacos (fiddle)
Dann Huff and Kraig Hutchens (electric guitar)
Paul Leim and Lonnie Wilson (drums)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Biff Watson (acoustic guitar)

Ty Herndon
's debut album, 'What Mattered Most' (Epic Records, 1995), reached No.9 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995; in addition, the album had the highest first-day shipment in the history of Epic Records' Nashville division.



In mid-1995, Joe Diffie recorded the title track (written by Lee Bogan and Joe Diffie) for Columbia Records' 'Runnin' Wide Open' (Columbia Records, 1995), an album comprising NASCAR-themed songs by various artists, including the following:

'Dedicated NASCAR Fans' (written by Sheila Brown, T. Graham Brown, Bruce Burch and Steve Schuffert)
/ this track was performed by T. Graham Brown
'The Fastest Horse in a One Horse Town' (written by Don Von Tress) / this track was performed by Billy Ray Cyrus
'The Wall' (written by Wade Hayes, Chick Rains and Wally Wilson) / this track was performed by Collin Raye
'Fuel To The Fire' (written by Jerry Cupit and Ken Mellons) / this track was performed by Ken Mellons
'You Could Be a NASCAR Fan If...' (written by Jeff Foxworthy) / this track was performed by Jeff Foxworthy
'Junk Cars' (written by Mac McAnally) / this track was performed by Ricky Van Shelton
'Racing With My Heart' (written by Buddy Cannon, Rick Lagneaux and Paul Muffoletto) / this track was performed by Sammy Kershaw
'Runnin' Wide Open' (written by Lee Bogan and Joe Diffie) / this track was performed by Joe Diffie
'Cadillac Ranch' (written by Bruce Springsteen) / this track was performed by Rick Trevino
'Oh, King Richard' (written by Rodney Crowell) / this track was performed by Kyle Petty



On Tuesday 19 September 1995, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Mr. Christmas' (Epic Records, 1995), which included one track, which was a hit single on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Leroy, The Redneck Reindeer' (written by Stacey Slate, Joe Diffie and Steve Pippin)
(No.33, 1995)

Joe Diffie's 'Mr. Christmas' (Epic Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

'Mr. Christmas' (written by Joe Diffie and Lee Bogan)
'The Christmas Song' (written by Mel Tormé and Robert Wells)
'Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas' (written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane)
'Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!' (written by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne)
'Wrap Me in Your Love' (written by Stacey Slate and Wyatt Easterling)
'All Because of a Baby Boy' (written by Stacey Slate and Wyatt Easterling)
'Silent Night', which was written by Franz Xaver Gruber (25 November 1787 - 7 June 1863) and Joseph Mohr (11 December 1792 - 4 December 1848)
'Praise & Alleluia to The Saviour' (written by Joe Diffie and Lee Bogan)
'Magazine Angels' (written by Raymond C. Davis Junior and Gene Pistilli)
'O, Holy Night', which was written by Adolphe Charles Adam (24 July 1803 - 3 May 1856) and John Sullivan Dwight

Joe Diffie's 'Mr. Christmas' (Epic Records, 1995) reached No.24 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1995, and No.129 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart the same year.



On Tuesday 5 December 1995, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Life's So Funny' (Epic Records, 1995), which included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Bigger Than the Beatles' (written by Jeb Stuart Anderson and Steve Dukes)
(No.1 for one week in February 1996)
'C-O-U-N-T-R-Y' (written by Ron Harbin, Ed Hill and Dusty Drake) (No.23, 1996)
'Down in a Ditch', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) / this track was released as a single in 1996, but it did not chart
'Whole Lotta Gone' (written by Mark James Oliverius and Keith Burns) (No.23, 1996)

Joe Diffie's 'Life's So Funny' (Epic Records, 1995) also included the following tracks:

'Never Mine to Lose' (written by Nancy Lee Baxter and Joe Doyle)
'Tears in the Rain' (written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry)
'She Loves Me' (written by Stephony Smith and Tommy Lee James)
'Back to the Cave' (written by Skip Ewing and Tim Johnson)
'I'm Willing to Try', which was written by Dean Sams, Wendell Mobley and John Jarrard (Thursday 7 May 1953 - Thursday 1 February 2001)
'Life's So Funny' (written by Bob Moulds and Wyatt Easterling)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's 'Life's So Funny' (Epic Records, 1995) included the following:

Lee Bogan (background vocals)
Joe Diffie (lead vocals, background vocals)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle, mandolin)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Randy McCormick (piano, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (percussion)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (keyboards)
Billy Joe Walker Junior (Friday 29 February 1952 - Tuesday 25 July 2017) (acoustic guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
The Nashville String Machine (strings arranged by Carl Gorodetzky)

Joe Diffie's 'Life's So Funny' (Epic Records, 1995) reached No.28 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1996, No.167 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1996, and No.14 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1996.



On Tuesday 22 April 1997, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Twice Upon a Time' (Epic Records, 1997), which included three tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'This is Your Brain' (written by Kelly Garrett and Craig Wiseman)
(No.25, 1997)
'Somethin' Like This' (written by Ron Williams and Michael Higgins) (No.40, 1997)
'The Promised Land' (written by Fred Lehner and Andy Spooner) (No.61, 1997)

Joe Diffie's 'Twice Upon a Time' (Epic Records, 1997) also included the following tracks:

'Twice Upon a Time', which was written by Skip Ewing and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)
'Show Me a Woman', which was written by Arthur Leo 'Doodle' Owens (Friday 28 November 1930 - Monday 4 October 1999) and Doug Johnson
'Houston, We Have a Problem' (written by Chris Lindsey, Steve Dukes and Michael Higgins)
'I Got a Feelin' (written by Joe Diffie and Lonnie Wilson)
'Zero' (written by Bob DiPiero and Craig Wiseman)
'It's Hard to be Me' (written by Max T. Barnes and Leslie Satcher)
'Call Me John Doe', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006)
'One More Breath' (written by Leslie Satcher)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's 'Twice Upon a Time' (Epic Records, 1997) included the following:

Lee Bogan, John Wesley Ryles, Doug Virden, Jenna Werling and Drew Womack (background vocals)
Joe Diffie (lead vocals, background vocals)
Stuart Duncan (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Randy McCormick, Steve Nathan and Matt Rollings (piano, organ, keyboards)
Terry McMillan (Monday 12 October 1953 - Friday 2 February 2007) (harmonica)
Billy Joe Walker Junior (Friday 29 February 1952 - Tuesday 25 July 2017) and John Willis (acoustic guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)

Joe Diffie's 'Twice Upon a Time' (Epic Records, 1997) reached No.33 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1997.



On Tuesday 9 June 1998, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1998), his first 'greatest hits' package, which included the biggest hit singles from Joe Diffie's first five studio albums, as well as three new tracks, 'Poor Me' (written by Al Anderson and Bob DiPiero), 'Texas Size Heartache' (written by Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson) and 'Hurt Me All The Time' (written by Terry Skinner and Chad Austin), of which the first two were released as singles:

'Third Rock From The Sun' (written by Sterling Whipple, Tony Martin and John Greenebaum)
 (No.1 for one week in September / October 1994)
'John Deere Green', which was written by Dennis Linde (Thursday 18 March 1943 - Friday 22 December 2006) (No.5 in December 1993)
'Texas Size Heartache' (written by Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson) (No.4, 1998) / this new track was produced by Don Cook, Lonnie Wilson and Joe Diffie
'Ships That Don't Come In' (written by Paul Nelson and Dave Gibson) (No.5 in July 1992) / this track also reached No.1 on Radio & Records Chart in the United States in 1992
'Pickup Man' (written by Howard Perdew and Kerry Kurt Phillips) (No.1 for four weeks in December 1994 / January 1995)
'So Help Me Girl' (written by Howard Perdew and Andy Spooner) (No.2 in February 1995)
'Poor Me' (written by Al Anderson and Bob DiPiero) (No.43, 1998) / this new track was produced by Don Cook, Lonnie Wilson and Joe Diffie
'Honky Tonk Attitude' (written by Joe Diffie and Lee Bogan) (No.5 in March 1993)
'Home' (written by Fred Lehner and Andy Spooner) (No.1, 1990) / this track reached No.1 on all three major country music format charts which were in existence at the time - Billboard, Radio & Records (now known as Mediabase 24/7) and the now-defunct Gavin Report - marking the first time in chart history that a country singer's debut single had done so / this track also reached No.1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks Chart
'Prop Me Up Beside The Jukebox (If I Die)' (written by Howard Perdew, Rick Blaylock and Kerry Kurt Phillips) (No.3 in August 1993)
'Bigger Than The Beatles' (written by Jeb Stuart Anderson and Steve Dukes) (No.1 for one week in February 1996)
'Hurt Me All The Time' (written by Terry Skinner and Chad Austin) / this new track was produced by Don Cook, Lonnie Wilson and Joe Diffie

Personnel involved in the recording of the three new tracks, 'Poor Me' (written by Al Anderson and Bob DiPiero), 'Texas Size Heartache' (written by Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson) and 'Hurt Me All The Time' (written by Terry Skinner and Chad Austin), which were included on Joe Diffie's 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1998), included the following:

Al Anderson (acoustic guitar, electric guitar)
Bruce C. Bouton and Paul Franklin (pedal steel guitar)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Joe Diffie (lead vocals, background vocals)
Larry Franklin (fiddle, mandolin)
John Barlow Jarvis (Hammond B-3, Wurlitzer)
Liana Manis (background vocals)
Brent Mason (electric guitar)
Steve Nathan (piano)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Glenn Worf (bass guitar)

Joe Diffie's 'Greatest Hits' (Epic Records, 1998) reached No.21 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998, and No.131 on the Billboard Top 200 albums Chart.



On Tuesday 22 September 1998, Columbia Records released 'A Tribute to Tradition' (Columbia Records, 1998), a various artists collection, which was dedicated to traditional country music, and included the following tracks:

'Stand By Your Man', which was written by Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998)
/ this track was performed by Dixie Chicks
'Mama Tried', which was written by Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016) / this track was performed by Randy Travis
'Wine, Women & Song' (written by Betty Sue Perry) / this track was performed by Patty Loveless
'I Never Go Around Mirrors', which was written by Lefty Frizzell (Saturday 31 March 1928 - Saturday 19 July 1975) and Sanger D. 'Whitey' Shafer / this track was performed by Trace Adkins
'Oh, Lonesome Me', which was written by Don Gibson (Tuesday 3 April 1928 - Monday 17 November 2003) / this track was performed by Mary Chapin Carpenter
'Behind Closed Doors' (written by Kenny O'Dell) / this track was performed by Joe Diffie / this track reached No.64 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998 based on unsolicited airplay
'She's Actin' Single (I'm Drinkin' Doubles)', which was written by Wayne Carson (Monday 31 May 1943 - Monday 20 July 2015) / this track was performed by Wade Hayes
'Til I Can Make It On My Own', which was written by George Richey (Saturday 30 November 1935 - Saturday 31 July 2010), Billy Sherrill (Thursday 5 November 1936 - Tuesday 4 August 2015) and Tammy Wynette (Tuesday 5 May 1942 - Monday 6 April 1998) / this track was performed by Martina McBride
'Cold, Cold Heart', which was written by Hank Williams (Monday 17 September 1923 - Thursday 1 January 1953) / this track was performed by Collin Raye
'The Three Bells' (written by Bert Reisfeld and Jean Villard) / this track was performed by Alison Krauss
'City Lights' (written by Bill Anderson) / this track was performed by Rick Trevino
'Honky Tonk Heroes (Like Me)', which was written by Billy Joe Shaver / this track was performed by Joe Diffie and Collin Raye
'Gone Out of My Mind' (written by Gene Dobbins, Mike Huffman and Bob Morrison) / this track was performed by Doug Stone
'Same Old Train' (written by Chris Austin and Greg Barnhill) / this track, which was performed by Clint Black, Joe Diffie, Merle Haggard (Tuesday 6 April 1937 - Wednesday 6 April 2016), Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Patty Loveless, Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012), Ricky Skaggs, Marty Stuart and Randy Travis, reached No.59 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart in 1998, and won the 1999 Grammy Award for 'Best Country Collaboration with Vocals' for all the artists involved



On Tuesday 22 September 1998, Lee Ann Womack saw the release of 'Some Things I Know' (MCA Records Nashville, 1998), which was produced by Mark Wright, and included four tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'A Little Past Little Rock' (written by Brett Jones, Tony Lane and Jess Brown)
 (No.2, 1998) / this track featured guest vocals from Jason Sellers
'I'll Think of a Reason Later' (written by Tony Martin and Tim Nichols) (No.2, 1998)
'(Now You See Me) Now You Don't' (written by Tony Lane, Brett Brown and David Lee) (No.12, 1999)
'Don't Tell Me' (written by Buddy Miller and Julie Miller) (No.56, 1999) / this track featured guest vocals from Buddy Miller and Julie Miller

Lee Ann Womack
's 'Some Things I Know' (MCA Records Nashville, 1998) also included the following tracks:

'Some Things I Know' (written by Burton Collins and Sally Barris)
 / this track was a duet with Vince Gill
'I'd Rather Have What We Had' (written by Bobby Braddock) / this track was a duet with Joe Diffie
'The Man Who Made My Mama Cry' (written by Billy Lawson, Lee Ann Womack and Dale Dodson) / this track featured guest vocals from Buddy Miller and Julie Miller
'I Keep Forgetting' (written by Jamie O'Hara) / this track was a duet with Vince Gill
'If You're Ever Down in Dallas' (written by Lee Ann Womack and Jason Sellers)
'When The Wheels Are Coming Off', which was written by Wynn Varble, Randy Hardison (Saturday 11 March 1961 - Tuesday 4 June 2002) and Leslie Satcher / this track featured guest vocals from Ricky Skaggs and Sharon White
'The Preacher Won't Have to Lie' (written by Billy Montana and Steve Dean)

Lee Ann Womack's 'Some Things I Know' (MCA Records Nashville, 1998) reached No.20 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1998, No.136 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1998, and No.5 on the Billboard Top Heat-Seekers Chart in 1998.



On Tuesday 1 June 1999, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'A Night to Remember' (Epic Records, 1999), which included four tracks, which were released as singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'A Night to Remember' (written by Max T. Barnes and T.W. Hale)
(No.6 in July 1999) / this track was Joe Diffie's highest entry on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart, reaching No.38 in 1999
'The Quittin' Kind', which was written by Mark D. Sanders, Sam Hogin (1950 - Monday 9 August 2004) and Phil Barnhart (No.21, 1999)
'It's Always Somethin' (written by Aimee Mayo and Marv Green) (No.5, 2000)
'Better Off Gone' (written by Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson) / this track was released as a single in 2000, but it did not chart

Joe Diffie's 'A Night to Remember' (Epic Records, 1999) also included the following tracks:

'You Can't Go Home' (written by Joe Diffie, Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson)
'I'm The Only Thing (I'll Hold Against You)', which was written by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016)
'Are We Even Yet' (written by Joe Diffie, Zack Turner and Lonnie Wilson)
'My Heart's in Over My Head' (written by Joe Diffie and Tim Menzies)
'Not in This Lifetime' (written by Bob DiPiero and Steve Diamond)
'Don't Our Love Look Natural', which was written by Don Cook and Harlan Howard (Thursday 8 September 1927 - Sunday 3 March 2002)

Personnel involved in the recording of Joe Diffie's 'A Night to Remember' (Epic Records, 1999) included the following:

Sam Bush (mandolin)
Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar)
Joe Diffie (lead vocals, harmony vocals)
Larry Franklin (fiddle)
Paul Franklin (steel guitar)
David Hungate and Glenn Worf (bass guitar)
John Barlow Jarvis (piano, B3 organ, Wurlitzer)
Tim Lauer (B3 organ, keyboards)
Liana Manis (harmony vocals)
Brent Mason (electric guitar, gut string guitar, Tic tac bass)
Steve Nathan (piano, keyboards, B3 organ)
Tom Roady (percussion)
Brent Rowan (electric guitar)
Lonnie Wilson (drums, percussion, harmony vocals)

Joe Diffie's 'A Night to Remember' (Epic Records, 1999) reached No.23 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 1999, No.189 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart in 1999, and No.25 on the Canadian RPM Country Albums Chart in 1999.

In 2001, Sony Nashville transferred Joe Diffie from its Epic Records division to the Monument Records division.

This move was due to a corporate decision that Epic Records had too many artists and Monument Records had too few.



On Tuesday 30 October 2001, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'In Another World' (Monument Records, 2001), which included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'In Another World' (written by Tom Shapiro, Wally Wilson and Jimmy Yeary)
(No.10 in February 2002) / this track also reached No.66 on the Billboard Hot 100 pop music singles chart in 2002
'This Pretender' (written by Gary LeVox, Lonnie Wilson and Zack Turner) (No.48, 2002)

Joe Diffie's 'In Another World' (Monument Records, 2001) also included the following tracks:

'My Give a Damn's Busted' (written by Tony Martin, Joe Diffie and Tom Shapiro)
'If I Lost Her', which was written by Kenny Beard (Thursday 26 February 1959 - Sunday 1 October 2017), Jimmy Yeary and Buddy Brock
'Stoned on Her Love' (written by Andy Griggs, Lonnie Wilson and Zack Turner)
'Hollow Deep as Mine' (written by John Scott Sherrill and Shawn Camp)
'Like a River Dreams of Rain' (written by Walt Aldridge and James LeBlanc)
'Live to Love Another Day' (written by Tony Martin, Tom Shapiro and Bryan White)
'What a Way to Go', which was written by Lonnie Wilson, Kim Williams (Saturday 28 June 1947 - Thursday 11 February 2016) and Zack Turner
'The Grandpa That I Know' (written by Tim Menzies and Shawn Camp)

Joe Diffie's 'In Another World' (Monument Records, 2001) reached No.26 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2001.

After Monument Records closed its Nashville branch, Joe Diffie began touring with Mark Chesnutt and Tracy Lawrence on the 'Rockin' Roadhouse Tour', which began in 2002.

It was also in 2002 when Joe Diffie was inducted into The Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.

In 2003, Joe Diffie signed to Broken Bow Records, one of Nashville's pre-eminent independent record labels.  Joe Diffie then began making music, donning the producer's hat for the first time in his career, enlisting Lonnie Wilson and Buddy Cannon as co-producers.



On Tuesday 1 June 2004, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Tougher Than Nails' (Broken Bow Records, 2004), which was produced by Joe Diffie, Lonnie Wilson and Buddy Cannon, and included two tracks, which were hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart:

'Tougher Than Nails' (written by Max T. Barnes, Kendell Marvel and Phil O'Donnell)
(No.19, 2004)
'If I Could Only Bring You Back' (written by Chip Davis and Frank Myers) (No.50, 2004)

Joe Diffie's 'Tougher Than Nails' (Broken Bow Records, 2004) also included the following tracks:

'Nothin' But The Radio' (written by Frank Myers and George Teren)
'Good News, Bad News' (written by Danny Wells and Chris Wallin)
'The More You Drink, The Better I Look' (written by Joe Diffie and Shawn Camp)
'Am I' (written by Joe Diffie and Billy Yates)
'Movin' Train' (written by Joe Diffie)
'What Would Waylon Do' (written by Leslie Satcher and Wynn Varble) / this track was a duet with George Jones (Saturday 12 September 1931 - Friday 26 April 2013)
'Something I Do For Me', which was written by Joe Diffie and Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011)
'Daddy's Home' (written by Joe Diffie and Jimmy Yeary)
'This Time Last Year' (written by Gilles Godard, Bobby Tomberlin and Robbie Wittkowski)
'My Redneck of the Woods' (written by Phil O'Donnell and Craig Morgan)

Joe Diffie's 'Tougher Than Nails' (Broken Bow Records, 2004) reached No.42 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart in 2004, and No.16 on the Billboard Independent Albums Chart in 2004.



Jo Dee Messina recorded Joe Diffie's 'My Give a Damn's Busted' (co-written with Tom Shapiro and Tony Martin) and included the track on 'Delicious Surprise' (Curb Records, 2005); the track was No.1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks Chart for two weeks in May 2005.

After leaving Broken Bow Records, Joe Diffie continued to tour, primarily playing smaller venues and county fairs.



On Tuesday 28 June 2005, Trick Pony saw the release of 'R.I.D.E.' (Asylum Records / Curb Records, 2005); one of the included tracks was 'Ain't Wastin' Good Whiskey on You' (written by Wally Wilson and Buck Moore), which featured background vocals from Tracy Byrd, Joe Diffie, Mel Tillis, Tanya Tucker and Darryl Worley, and reached No.42 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart in 2005.

Michelle Wright: 'Everything & More' (Icon Records, 2006)

Michelle Wright recorded Joe Diffie's 'My Give a Damn's Busted' (co-written with Tom Shapiro and Tony Martin) and included the track on 'Everything & More' (Icon Records, 2006).



Confederate Railroad recorded Joe Diffie's 'New Way (To Light Up An Old Flame)' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson) and included the track on 'Cheap Thrills' (Shanachie Records, 2007).

In 2007, Joe Diffie joined with Lonestar, Charlie Daniels and Craig Morgan to perform a benefit concert for Sgt. Kevin Downs, a soldier who was severely wounded in Iraq.

In 2008, Joe Diffie compiled and released a live album, and he signed to Rounder Records later that year.  Rounder Records released an album called 'The Ultimate Collection' (Rounder Records, 2009), which comprised re-recordings of Joe Diffie's hit singles for Epic Records.



On Tuesday 26 October 2010, Joe Diffie saw the release of 'Homecoming: The Bluegrass Album' (Rounder Records, 2010), which included the following tracks:

'Somehow Tonight', which was written by Earl Scruggs (Sunday 6 January 1924 - Wednesday 28 March 2012)
'Lonesome & Dry As a Bone' (written by Shawn Camp, Matt Lindsey and Mel Tillis Junior)
'Tall Cornstalk', which was written by Shawn Camp and Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011)
'Fit For a King' (written by Carl Jackson and Jim Rushing)
'Route 5, Box 109' (written by Galen Griffin and Kerry Kurt Phillips)
'Rainin' On Her Rubber Dolly' (written by Shawn Camp and Joe Diffie) / this track featured guest vocals from The Grascals
'I Know How It Feels' (written by Larry Cordle and Rusty Morrell)
'Tennessee Tea' (written by Joe Diffie and Billy Joe Foster)
'Free & Easy', which was written by Harley Allen (Monday 23 January 1956 - Wednesday 30 March 2011)
'Stormy Weather Once Again' (written by Shawn Camp and Jimmy Stewart)
'Til Death' (written by Joe Diffie and Steven Pippin)
'Hard To Handle', which was written by Alvertis Bell, Allen Jones and Otis Redding (Tuesday 9 September 1941 - Sunday 10 December 1967)

Joe Diffie's 'Homecoming: The Bluegrass Album' (Rounder Records, 2010) was produced by Grammy Award-winning producer and engineer Luke Wooten, and included an impressive cast of super pickers, including Rhonda Vincent, Alecia Nugent, Rob Ickes and The Grascals.

Joe Diffie's 'Homecoming: The Bluegrass Album' (Rounder Records, 2010) reached No.10 on the Billboard Top Bluegrass Albums Chart in 2010.  In August 2010, Joe Diffie toured at various county fairs in support of the album.



On Tuesday 16 October 2012, Jason Aldean saw the release of 'Night Train' (Broken Bow Records, 2012), which included '1994' (written by Thomas Rhett, Luke Laird and Barry Dean).  The song, which was released in February 2013 as the third single from the album, name-dropped Joe Diffie and incorporated several of his song titles into the lyrics.

Upon hearing about the song, Joe Diffie said that 'it's really an honour' to be mentioned in the song, and that it was 'flattering'.



On Tuesday 28 May 2013, Joe Diffie, along with Aaron Tippin and Sammy Kershaw, saw the release of 'All in the Same Boat' (Red Distribution Records, 2013), which included the following tracks:

'All in The Same Boat' (written by Jamey Johnson, Don Poythress and Wynn Varble)
'Kiss This' (written by Philip Douglas, Aaron Tippin and Thea Tippin)
'Heart of Gold' (written by Neil Young)
'She Don't Know She's Beautiful' (written by Paul Harrison and Bob McDill)
'The Way You Look Tonight' (written by Dorothy Fields and Jerome Kern)
'On & On' (written by Stephen Bishop)
'The Route That I Took' (written by Sammy Kershaw)
'I'm Hangin' On' (written by Joe Diffie and Steve Pippin)
'Misery Loves Country' (written by David Fraiser, Edward Hill and Josh Kerr)
'I Love to Work' (written by Bradley Gaskin, Sammy Kershaw and Billy Lawson)
'He Believed' (written by Aaron Tippin and Thea Tippin)
'Old Friends' (written by Jim Beavers and Ben Hayslip)

Cody Rhodes: 'Nick of Time - The EP' (Cody Rhodes Music, 2017) Holly Dunn: 'The Blue Rose of Texas' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989)

Cody Rhodes recorded Joe Diffie's
'There Goes My Heart Again' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry) and included the track on 'Nick of Time - The EP' (Cody Rhodes Music, 2017).

Holly Dunn (Thursday 22 August 1957 - Tuesday 15 November 2016) included Joe Diffie's 'There Goes My Heart Again' (co-written with Lonnie Wilson and Wayne Perry) on her fourth album, 'The Blue Rose of Texas' (Warner Bros. Records, 1989), which was released on Monday 10 July 1989; Holly Dunn's version of the track reached No.4 on the Billboard country music singles chart in 
1989 and featured backing vocals from Joe Diffie.

• Visit Joe Diffie's Official Site at joediffie.com

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